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Read the latest articles about Sir Francis Bacon regarding his life and the evidence for Shakespeare Authorship.

Sir Francis BaconIf the enjoyment of happiness is a great good, the power of imparting it to others is greater.” – Francis Bacon

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9 Short Cryptography Papers (Numbers 4-6) by A. Phoenix

SirBacon.org is proud to share the 9 Paper Cryptographic Series by A. Phoenix.

Below are the next three papers:


British Intelligence and Bacon’s Bi-literal Cipher Revealing his Secret Story

Around the time General Cartier was endorsing Mrs Gallup’s bi-literal cipher decipherments in a series of articles in French periodicals, an article appeared in the now obscure and defunct Cassell’s Weekly apparently written by a British intelligence officer who had secretly operated in France throughout the first World War at GHQ. The virtually unknown article fortuitously appeared exactly three hundred years after the publication of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio in the May edition of 1923. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/British Intelligence.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

The Declassified History of Military Intelligence & the Baconian Simple Cipher System Revealing that Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is Shakespeare
By A Phoenix

For CYPHARS; they are commonly in Letters and Alphabets, but may bee in Wordes. The kindes of CYPHARS, (besides the SIMPLE CYPHARS with Changes, and intermixtures of NVLLES, and NONSIGNIFCANTS) are many, according to the Nature or Rule of the infoulding; WHEELE-CYPHARS, KAY-CYPHARS, DOVBLES, &c. But the vertues of them, whereby they are to be preferred, are three; that they be not laborious to write and reade; that they bee impossible to discypher; and in some cases, that they bee without suspition. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/THE DECLASSIFIED HISTORY OF MILITARY INTELLIGENCE .pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

Declassified US Intelligence Cipher Publication of the Signal Intelligence Agency (Forerunner of the NSA) and the Baconian Simple cipher system Revealing that Bacon is Shakespeare

There are a number of other classified publications on cryptology and intelligence which contain concealed cryptographic messages pertaining to Bacon’s authorship of the Shakespeare works. The three volume The Historical Background of the Signal Intelligence Agency by Theodore W. Richards was as stated on its title page ‘Prepared under the Direction of the ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-2 12 April 1946’ for the ‘United States Army Security Agency. Washington, DC’. Its author Professor Richards, America’s first Nobel laureate in chemistry, had previously headed up the Secret Ink Subsection in MI-8. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/DECLASSIFIED US INTELLIGENCE CIPHER PUBLICATION.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

Review of María José Falcón y Tella, The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare.

by Christina G. Waldman


Download PDF

Review of María José Falcón y Tella, The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare.

Review of María José Falcón y Tella, The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare.
Translation by Dierdre B. Jerry of El Derecho en Cervantes y Shakespeare (Marcial Pons, 2021). Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2021.

by Christina G. Waldman
June 7, 2024

“In the Spanish-speaking world, María José Falcón y Tella stands out among those authors who have studied the theme of law and literature in its diverse modalities,” writes Carla Forelli, Professor of Legal Philosophy, University of Bologna, in her foreword to Falcón y Tella’s The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare (xiii). Falcón y Tella is the author of Derecho y Literature (2015; translated into English as Law and Literature [Brill, 2016]). In her foreword, Forelli refers to Derecho y Literature as “one of the greatest contemporary European studies on law and literature” (xiii). Read more…>>

9 Short Cryptography Papers (Numbers 1-3) by A. Phoenix

SirBacon.org is proud to share the 9 Paper Cryptographic Series by A. Phoenix.

Below are the first three papers:


Captain Powell, A Member of US Cipher Intelligence, The Fraudulent Friedmans, and his Endorsement of Elizabeth Wells Gallup’s Decipherment of the Bacon Biliteral Cipher in the Shakespeare First Folio

The fourteen-page pamphlet The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon published by the Riverbank Laboratories written by J. A. Powell is of a great deal of interest. This work gives rise to a series of subtle deceptions perpetrated by the Friedmans designed to withhold important information about its author and his undoubted expertise in the area of codes and ciphers in general and the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher in particular. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/CAPTAIN POWELL.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

The Two Heads of French Cipher Intelligence and the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher Deciphered by Elizabeth Wells Gallup Revealing Bacon is Shakespeare

From before the turn of the twentieth century there had been a growing consensus among German, and to a lesser extent, Dutch academics that Bacon was in fact the secret author of the Shakespeare works. The endorsement of Gallup’s decipherments by General Cartier had the striking effect of vigorously renewing the debate in post war France. Opinion, as it had been in Germany and Holland was divided, with opposing views warmly expressed in numerous articles, some it has to be said more scholarly than others. General Cartier’s endorsement of the bi-literal cipher was also not to go unnoticed in the close knit world of cryptology. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/LANGE AND SOUDART.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

Herbert O. Yardley, Head of MI-8 (the codes and ciphers Bureau), and the Bacon Bi-literal, Simple, and Kay Cipher Systems Revealing Bacon is Shakespeare

During the time Riverbank Cipher Department headed by William and Elizebeth Friedman was carrying out code and cipher work for the US government and various other federal agencies plans had secretly been underfoot in Washington to establish a Cipher Bureau of its own. On 10th June 1917 the first government Cipher Bureau under Military Intelligence 8 (MI-8) was established in Washington by the War Department with Major Ralph H. Van Deman, Director of Military Intelligence, appointing Herbert O. Yardley, as its first head. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/YARDLEY.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

4in1. Mask of Shakespeare, Mysteries of Bacon, Book by Cartier, Secrets of the NSA

The official web site of the book “4in1“:

4in1.ws

4in1. Mask of Shakespeare, Mysteries of Bacon, Book by Cartier, Secrets of the NSA

In 1938, the authoritative European cryptographer, General François Cartier, who headed the cryptographic service of France military during WWI, published an analytical book “The Problem of Cryptography and History.”

This entire work was dedicated to recovering the secret autobiography of Francis Bacon, which was encrypted using his own biliteral cipher and embedded in parts across numerous printed books by various authors of the Elizabethan era.

Read more…>>

A. Phoenix read and reviewed the book:

FRANCIS BACON, THE BACON BI-LITERAL DECIPHERMENTS OF GENERAL FRANCOIS CARTIER HEAD OF THE FRENCH CIPHER INTELLIGENCE SERVICE, THE FRAUDULENT FRIEDMANS, AND A WORK WRITTEN BY A FORMER MEMBER OF THE RUSSIAN INTELLIGENCE SERVICES

4in1

Mask of Shakespeare

Mysteries of Bacon

Book by Cartier

Secrets of the NSA

(Second Edition, 2023 translated from the Russian)

https://4in1.ws/

‘In the foundations of cryptography as a solid scientific computer mathematical discipline there lies a big Mystery of the occult mystical sense. By a long-standing tradition, it is forbidden to talk about this Mystery. But by whom it is forbidden and on what grounds, actually, no one knows..’

Due to the multi-layered depth and complexity of this work it would be virtually impossible to do it justice in a brief review or summary of its interconnected themes. This landmark work is a milestone in Bacon-Shakespeare scholarship and its secret hidden links with British, US & French Intelligence, the Folger Shakespeare Library and its learned journal the Shakespeare Quarterly, and numerous individuals working for these Agencies and Institutions, that were or became involved in Bacon-Shakespeare scholarship. This indispensable work in particular focuses upon two such individuals William F. Friedman and Francois Cartier, the one world famous in the realms of Bacon-Shakespeare cryptology and the other (as the author of this work repeatedly emphasizes) almost completely written out of the Bacon-Shakespeare canon.

In support of its central contentions, it contains little known and difficult to access documents, evidence and facts, and provides links to specialised cryptological and intelligence publications and articles, and other obscure sources of information that have remained suppressed or hidden for decades and in some instances for more than a century.

I have written an article on the subject which I have placed on Academia:

Francis_Bacon_the_Bacon_Bi_literal_Decip-1.pdf

Robin Browne, Baconian (1941-2024)

 

Sirbacon.org wishes to acknowledge the passing of Robin Browne,(1941-2024) a long time British Baconian and member of the Francis Bacon Society, who had an outstanding career as a cinematographer.

Featured in the latest June 2024 FBS newsletter, Robin Browne, had a life-long interest in Francis Bacon and the Shakespeare Authorship question with a deep interest in Baconian codes and ciphers.

See his essays : XXII First Folio : The Smoking Gun and XXIII First Folio Fobia:
FrancisBaconSociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

Here is his Obituary in The Guardian:

Robin Browne obituary

Read more…>>

The Bacon Shakespeare Question

 
 

Cockburn, N. B., The Bacon Shakespeare Question The Baconian Theory Made Sane, The Francis Bacon Society edition, 2024, pp.740.

 

The Bacon Shakespeare Question was first printed in 1998 and for many years now has been out of print. Barrister Nigel B Cockburn generously left the copyright for his work to the Francis Bacon Society and this year with the support of its members, the Society has taken the decision to re-print it in order to rightly make it available to a new generation of enquirers into the Bacon Shakespeare Question.

With a new biography of the author by the Society and new foreword by American lawyer and author Christina G. Waldman, The Francis Bacon Society 2024 edition is now available once more.

 

‘Shakespeare was a Lawyer’ – Judge Nathaniel Holmes

‘If anything is certain in regard to the Sonnets, the Poems, and the Plays, it is certain that the author was a Lawyer’ – Judge Webb

The Bacon Shakespeare Question by the late Nigel B. Cockburn barrister of the Inner Temple builds a formidable, evidence-based case in favour of Sir Francis Bacon of Gray’s Inn’s authorship of Shakespeare. ‘The best single book ever written on the subject’.

New edition is available here:
FrancisBaconSociety.co.uk/bookstore/the-bacon-shakespeare-question/

Cockburn, N. B., The Bacon Shakespeare Question The Baconian Theory Made Sane, The Francis Bacon Society edition, 2024

Reviewed by Mather Walker

SirBacon.org/mcockburnreview.htm

Book Review by Mather Walker

Nine Primary Images linking Francis Bacon to the Shakespeare Works

by A. Phoenix.


Paper: https://SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/NINE-PRIMARY-IMAGES.pdf

  1. The second Rosicrucian manifesto the Confessio Fraternitatis (1615) reveals that the actor William Shakspere of Stratford is an Impostor
  2. The Plempii Emblem (1616) Depicting Fortune Standing on a Globe raising up Francis Bacon and pushing down his Literary Mask the actor William Shakspere of Stratford
  3. The frontispiece to Speculum Sophicum Rhodo-Stauroticum (1618) depicting Francis Bacon and his Literary Mask William Shakspere of Stratford
  4. The title page of Gustav Selenus’ extremely rare Cryptomenytices et Cryptographiae Libri IX (1624), depicting Francis Bacon giving his literary mask William Shakspere one of his Shakespeare plays to be performed at the Globe Theatre
  5. The 1645 title page of De Augmentis Scientiarum showing Bacon with his hand controlling his literary mask the actor Shakpere of Stratford
  6. In the address To the Reader prefixed to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio, Ben Jonson reveals in an anagram that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare
  7. In the verse To the memory of my beloued, The Avthor Mr. William Shakespeare Ben Jonson again reveals in an anagram that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare
  8. The outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (known as the Northumberland Manuscript) that originally contained copies of his two Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III
  9. The frontispiece of Bacon’s La Saggesse Mysterieuse (1641) depicting Pallas Athena, the Shaker of the Spear from whence he adopted his nom de plume Shakespeare

See here for more information:

Video:

Six Primary Documents Confirming Francis Bacon is Shakespeare

by A. Phoenix.


Many people who are unfamiliar with Baconian research seem to believe that the Baconian evidence for Francis Bacon writing the Shakespeare works is all based on various cipher and code evidence of differing and various complexities. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Here are six pieces of documentary evidence that are not based on ciphers, codes or anagrams and everything to do with hard, primary documentary evidence that firmly links Francis Bacon to the Shakespeare Works.

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Essay: Thomas Shelton and Hamet Benengeli

 
 

by Francis Carr

If Don Quixote was not written by Miguel de Cervantes, who was the real author?

There is no evidence that it came from the pen of any of Cervantes’ contemporaries in Spain. None of his private letters have come down to us; there is no evidence that another Spanish author is involved.

It is in Don Quixote, in the work itself, that we may find an answer to the question of authorship. If someone wrote this novel using the name of Cervantes, it is possible that some clues have been deliberately placed in the text.

The author, whoever he was, speaks to us, his readers, in his Preface. In the very first page he takes the trouble to point out that there is some problem of authorship, or fatherhood. Of course, this may be merely a device, a pose but it may not be.

Though in shew a Father, yet in truth but a stepfather to Don Quixote.

If this were the only reference to another man as the author, the real father, this mention of stepfatherhood could be ignored. But another name is mentioned over and over again. In Chapter 1 of Book 2 of the First Part in Shelton’s translation (Chapter 9 of the modern Penguin translation by J. M. Cohen, P77) we read:

The historie of Don Quixote of the Mancha, written by Cyd Hamet Benengeli, an Arabicall Historiographer.

Read more of Carr’s essay…>>

Don Quixote resource list by A. Phoenix


A. Phoenix list of Don Quixote references

Bringing home Bacon Shakespeare Cervantes

by Lawrence Gerald

Bringing home Bacon Shakespeare Cervantes

“Bringing Home Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes.”

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES

A word from Lawrence Gerald
March 2024

I visited the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont CA on January 22, 1991. It was my only visit there and it was during their annual Francis Bacon Birthday Celebration that was open to the public. I had been in touch with the curator, Elizabeth Wrigley who had governed for over 50 years an https://sirbacon.org/links/wrigley.htm and she gave me full permission to check out the books.

I remember how eager I was to peruse the Library’s stacks in this Disneyworld of Baconiana. Out of all the hundreds and hundreds of books the one that struck me the most was discovering this book in German, Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes by Alfred Von Weber-Ebenhof. I didn’t know this book existed. It was published in Austria in 1917 and it was the first book published that challenged the authorship of Cervantes’ Don Quixote.

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES by Alfred von Weber-Ebenhoff

I remember calling my friend Steven Marble a longtime Baconian that I was introduced to by Peter Dawkins, and telling him about this book and asking him if he had heard about it. Steven said no he hadn’t known about the book and I asked him if he ever finds anything more about the book could you please let me know.

A month goes by and I will never forget this moment when I get a call from Steven telling me I’m not going to believe what had transpired since our last call. With the help of Elizabeth Wrigley, Steven was introduced to Emily who turns out was an old acquaintance who wanted to find a new home for her father’s Baconian library. Turns out Emily’s father was Arthur Cornwall author of his own book on Bacon, that combined ciphers and an investigation into Bacon’s life beyond his alleged death in 1626.
Cornwall, Arthur. Francis the First Unacknowledged King of Great Britain and Ireland. 1936.

Included in the books being donated to Steven by Emily was an English translation of Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes by Weber Ebenhof ! Arthur Cornwall had translated the book during the 1930’s from the German to English. It was the only English copy in the world, and it was unpublished. Wow. What a tangled web we weave.

Also, please read Don Elfenbein’s wonderful Book Review of Bacon Shakespeare and Cervantes. (See below in this article.)

I want to thank Steven Marble for his generous permission to allow publishing the book on sirbacon.org and I am grateful to Dr John Torbert, who took on the digitizing of the Cornwall English translation for his selfless efforts and taking the time to bring this into fruition. Also huge thanks to Rob Fowler, who helped guide the formatting and preparation of the text for the readers of sirbacon.org

I would also like to acknowledge all the previous writers who shared their expertise on the subject of Don Quixote authorship in Baconiana the published Journal of the Francis Bacon Society who are about to celebrate 138 years of continued existence.
https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/
This includes Francis Carr who was willing to risk his reputation for where his research led him and published the second explosive book on the topic Who Wrote Don Quxiote ? It took Carr 12 years to endure ridicule and closed doors before having published his book in 2004 because it’s that controversial and people are biased from their uneducated culture bound opinions and already made up minds. The authorship of Don Quixote remains controversial and upsetting for some, to be dismissed by others, while contemplated, digested and enjoyed by many more who have an open mind in search for truth.

It’s now been 33 years since I discovered the book in the stacks of the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont, CA , a 107 years since Ebenhof published his book and around 94 years since Cornwall translated it from German.

So there you have it the story how this book came to be and now sirbacon.org is happy to present for the first time the English translation of Alfred Von Weber-Ebenhof’s Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes.

A word from -Steven Marble

Being a long-time student of Baconiana, I started my investigation in 1974 with the introduction of Francis Bacon as the true author of the Shakespeare canon, a Rosicrucian, editor of the King James Version of the Bible, and so on. This fascination led further into the mysterious Mr. Bacon’s life in Ojai where I was living from 1976 through 1980. Through my friend Lucy Colson, I became acquainted with her mother Emily and the unique life she had lived accompanying her father Arthur Cornwall on his quest to discover whether Francis had died where and when he was reputed to have 1626. As a family friend, I even became Emily and her husband’s gardener for a while.

As fate would have it, while visiting Elizabeth Wrigley at the Francis Bacon Library, I let her know that I was hoping to buy a copy of Baxter’s The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works to add to my research collection. Elizabeth let me know that she had received a call from a lady in Ojai that was looking to sell her library of Baconiana books and manuscripts. And that lady was my old acquaintance, Emily.

With amazed gratitude I received her father’s entire research library which I still have to this day with my own collection. The purpose for all this collecting and study was to create a series for television. Those thoughts remain, after attempting three times to launch such a dream project, I have moved on to other endeavors for now.

Review of Bacon–Shakespeare–Cervantes, book two

by Alfred von Weber-Ebenhof
and translated by Arthur B. Cornwall
Reviewed by Donald Elfenbein*

* Don Elfenbein is a former law and philosophy professor and writing instructor, a freelance editor, an independent researcher, and the author of The Play That Solves the Shakespeare Authorship Mystery: The Allegory of Francis Bacon’s Natural Philosophy in The Tempest (Lulu Press, 2023). He earned an A.B. magna cum laude in developmental psychology at Harvard College and also holds a J.D. from the same university. He has been a student of the Shakespeare authorship question for many years.

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES
(FRANCIS TUDOR)

A criticism upon the
Shaksper and Cervantes Festivals

By
Alfred von Weber-Ebenhoff

(Translated into English by Arthur B. Cornwall)

Anzengruber Publishing House, Suschitzky Brothers

Leipzig-Vienna 1917

The Man Who Saw Through Time : Loren Eisley’s “Francis Bacon and the Modern Dilemma”

Francis Bacon and the Modern Dilemma
by Loren Eisehy

CONTENTS

1 / THE MAN WHO SAW THROUGH TIME – 2

2 / BACON AS SCIENTIST AND EDUCATOR – 31

3 / BACON AND THE MODERN DILEMMA – 63

BIBLIOGRAPHY – 97

A New Book by A. Phoenix

by A. Phoenix.


The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument

In 1623 Francis Bacon with his scriptorium or literary workshop housed at Gorhambury staffed by his good pens among them the poet George Herbert and the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson, were busy working on the Shakespeare First Folio which was then making its way through the Jaggard printing house.

On its publication in November 1623, it carried a dedication to the Grand Master of England William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke and his brother Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery.

It was only a little over a year after the publication of his Shakespeare First Folio that Bacon started preparing for his final Last Will and Testament.

After consultations with those close to him and dealing with some practical arrangements he commenced the formal process of making a will on 23 May 1625 of such detail and complexity that it was not completed until six months later in the December. In an earlier draft of his will the lawyer Edward Herbert (a cousin of the poet George Herbert a contributor to the Memoriae and the Herbert brothers to whom Bacon dedicated the Shakespeare First Folio) was charged with overseeing which of his manuscripts should be published and which should be suppressed. In the final document Bacon addresses himself to future ages followed by some very pregnant instructions still shrouded in secrecy and unresolved to the present day. He bequeaths to the care of Bishop of London John Williams (a contributor to the Memoriae) his letters, speeches and other papers touching matters of state some of which Bacon did not want published but nevertheless wished them to be kept in private hands in safe keeping. By this Bacon meant to use his own words of reserving part to a private succession, namely his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, who down the centuries have very carefully watched over Bacon’s secret life and writings, including the manuscripts of his Shakespeare poems and plays. In his will he also desired his executors Sir John Constable and Sir William Boswell (a contributor to the Memoriae) to take into their possession all his papers in his cabinets, boxes, and presses, and to seal them up until they had the leisure to peruse them. In December 1625 his last will and testament was signed in the presence of his private secretary and Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley, who had lived with Bacon for the last ten years of his life, who had access to the majority of his literary manuscripts, including the manuscripts of his Shakespeare plays, which were placed into his hands to be kept concealed from public view until his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood decide to reveal the hidden truth to posterity and the world.

In the months following Bacon’s death to the profane world his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and quietly issued a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum.

This rare and still virtually unknown work contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon, which his orthodox editors and biographers have simply glossed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare.

The Shakespeare monument at Stratford-upon-Avon secretly commissioned by Bacon to which the Memoriae is inextricably linked is replete with Rosicrucian-Freemasonry symbolism serving as a memorial to Francis Bacon our secret Shakespeare.

It knowingly echoes verses in the Memoriae, and as with the Shakespeare First Folio that is dedicated to the Grand Master of England, it is replete with Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic symbolism and cryptic devices, which read and deciphered repeatedly reveal and confirm that Bacon is Shakespeare.

Several centuries later the English translations of the Memoriae containing the 32 Latin verses portraying Bacon as Shakespeare are here made readily available and accessible for the first time, enabling Bacon and Shakespeare scholars, all interested students of English literature and the rest of the world, to read for themselves a work revealing the secret of the true authorship of the Shakespeare works, one kept from them for the last four hundred years.

Full paper: The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian.pdf

1 Minute Trailer
Latin verses confirm Francis Bacon as our Secret Shakespeare

Secret Bacon-Shakespeare Links – Bacon Verses, Shakespeare First Folio & The Stratford Monument

The Marriage of Elizabeth Tudor by Alfred Dodd

Sirbacon.org wishes to thank Dr. John Torbert for digitizing The Marriage of Elizabeth Tudor by Alfred Dodd and making it available for the readers of sirbacon.org

The Smoking Gun

by A. Phoenix.


Francis Bacon and his Unique Copy of the 1587 edition of Holinshed’s Chronicles
with Marginal Annotations in his own hand alongside passages used for
his Shakespeare Plays
The Smoking Gun of the True Authorship of the Shakespeare Works

HOLINSHED-SYNOPSIS.pdf

Full paper: FINAL-HOLINSHED.pdf

2 Minute Trailer – Where is ‘Shakespeare’s Holinshed’?

The Smoking Gun of the Shakespeare Authorship Question – Bacon’s copy of Shakespeare’s Holinshed

Critical Insights of Two Oxfordian Books.

by A. Phoenix.


downloads/aphoenix/LOONEY.pdf

J. THOMAS LOONEY FOUNDER OF THE DELUSIONAL OXFORDIAN THEORY

J. Thomas Looney originated the fallacious Oxfordian theory that Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford (1550-1604) was the true author of nearly all the Shakespeare poems and plays in his work “Shakespeare Identified” in Edward de Vere the seventeenth Earl of Oxford first published in 1920. The whole Oxfordian theory and all subsequent Oxfordian works are based upon and built from this publication right up to the present day. To mark its centenary The De Vere Society devoted the issue of its 2020 quarterly newsletter to whom it described as their ‘founding father’ J. Thomas Looney and his much-vaunted seminal work. The same year The Oxford Shakespeare Fellowship announced a new centenary edition of Shakespeare Identified edited by James A. Warren, which, without a trace of irony we are informed, ‘remains the most revolutionary book on Shakespeare ever written.’ Perhaps only Oxfordians could make such a grandiose claim for a book written without any bibliographical apparatus-without footnotes or references, nor a bibliography

Read more…>>

downloads/aphoenix/CB.pdf

Charles Beauclerk A Descendant of Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, the Founder and President of the De Vere Society

The leading light of the Oxfordian movement Charles Francis Topham de Vere Beauclerk (b. 1965), Earl of Burford, is heir apparent to Murray Beauclerk, fourteenth Duke of St Albans and is descended from Charles Beauclerk, the first Duke of St. Albans, the illegitimate son of Charles II and Nell Gwynne. He was educated at Eton College and Sherborne school before moving up to Hertford College, Oxford. Through his father he is related to Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford.

He is the Founder and President of the De Vere Society, former President of the Shakespeare Oxford Society, and trustee of the Shakespeare Authorship Trust.

Read more…>>

The Martrydom of Francis Bacon by Alfred Dodd

 


Despite the historic reality  there  are writers who still to this day that ignore the historical facts and out of ignorance, maybe jealousy, maintain that Bacon was guilty of bribery and prefer not to correct themselves. It is ironic that Edward Coke a long time nemesis of Francis Bacon, wrote : “The Slander of a dead man is a living fault,” when he had slandered Francis Bacon many times while both were alive. In Alfred Dodd’s book, The Martrydom of Francis Bacon : he clears Bacon’s name from the false bribery charges that Bacon HAD to plead guilty to in order to save King James from political turmoil. This book delves into the narrative account that led to Bacon’s 1621 impeachment as Chancellor of England. Bacon was a man of Honor and Integrity and because of his unjust impeachment this may have contributed to being another reason why he chose to remain anonymous when the Shakespeare First Folio came out 2 years later in 1623. The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon along with the Nieves Mathews, seminal ” Francis Bacon History of a Character Assassination” nmathewsbook vindicate Bacon’s innocence. Sirbacon.org also would like to thank Dr. John Torbert, for his dedication and contribution in digitizing the Martyrdom book.

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Challenging the Lie in a Free Society: Even in Shakespeare Authorship Studies?

by Christina G. Waldman


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My late friend Sam had two favorite authors, William Butler Yeats and Alexandr Solzhenitsyn. The latter wrote One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and The Gulag Archipelago. I have not read the latter, but the former was memorable. Solzhenitsyn’s essay, “Live Not by Lies,” was published February 12, 1974, the day after he was exiled from Russia. In it, he urges people to “never knowingly support lies.” Read more…>>

First Folio 400 Year Anniversary 1623-2023

By Francis Bacon Society


Dear Members,

8th November 2023

Today is a very special day in that it marks 400 years since the Shakespeare First Folio was first entered on the Stationers’ Register back on 8th November 1623.

To commemorate this milestone anniversary, The Francis Bacon Society has published a special edition of the society’s journal Baconiana edited by A Phoenix.

It features many contrasting areas of research created by 12 contributors from different parts of the world which makes it a truly international publication.

Baconiana is now available to read here:

francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

Kind regards,

Susan McIlroy
Chair

The Francis Bacon Society

www.francisbaconsociety.co.uk

Youtube:

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Registered charity no. 209426

New website: SpearshakerProductions.com

 


The Spearshaker website is now live www.SpearshakerProductions.com 

 

9 Short Cryptography Papers (Numbers 4-6) by A. Phoenix

SirBacon.org is proud to share the 9 Paper Cryptographic Series by A. Phoenix.

Below are the next three papers:


British Intelligence and Bacon’s Bi-literal Cipher Revealing his Secret Story

Around the time General Cartier was endorsing Mrs Gallup’s bi-literal cipher decipherments in a series of articles in French periodicals, an article appeared in the now obscure and defunct Cassell’s Weekly apparently written by a British intelligence officer who had secretly operated in France throughout the first World War at GHQ. The virtually unknown article fortuitously appeared exactly three hundred years after the publication of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio in the May edition of 1923. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/British Intelligence.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

The Declassified History of Military Intelligence & the Baconian Simple Cipher System Revealing that Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is Shakespeare
By A Phoenix

For CYPHARS; they are commonly in Letters and Alphabets, but may bee in Wordes. The kindes of CYPHARS, (besides the SIMPLE CYPHARS with Changes, and intermixtures of NVLLES, and NONSIGNIFCANTS) are many, according to the Nature or Rule of the infoulding; WHEELE-CYPHARS, KAY-CYPHARS, DOVBLES, &c. But the vertues of them, whereby they are to be preferred, are three; that they be not laborious to write and reade; that they bee impossible to discypher; and in some cases, that they bee without suspition. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/THE DECLASSIFIED HISTORY OF MILITARY INTELLIGENCE .pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

Declassified US Intelligence Cipher Publication of the Signal Intelligence Agency (Forerunner of the NSA) and the Baconian Simple cipher system Revealing that Bacon is Shakespeare

There are a number of other classified publications on cryptology and intelligence which contain concealed cryptographic messages pertaining to Bacon’s authorship of the Shakespeare works. The three volume The Historical Background of the Signal Intelligence Agency by Theodore W. Richards was as stated on its title page ‘Prepared under the Direction of the ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF, G-2 12 April 1946’ for the ‘United States Army Security Agency. Washington, DC’. Its author Professor Richards, America’s first Nobel laureate in chemistry, had previously headed up the Secret Ink Subsection in MI-8. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/DECLASSIFIED US INTELLIGENCE CIPHER PUBLICATION.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

Review of María José Falcón y Tella, The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare.

by Christina G. Waldman


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Review of María José Falcón y Tella, The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare.

Review of María José Falcón y Tella, The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare.
Translation by Dierdre B. Jerry of El Derecho en Cervantes y Shakespeare (Marcial Pons, 2021). Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2021.

by Christina G. Waldman
June 7, 2024

“In the Spanish-speaking world, María José Falcón y Tella stands out among those authors who have studied the theme of law and literature in its diverse modalities,” writes Carla Forelli, Professor of Legal Philosophy, University of Bologna, in her foreword to Falcón y Tella’s The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare (xiii). Falcón y Tella is the author of Derecho y Literature (2015; translated into English as Law and Literature [Brill, 2016]). In her foreword, Forelli refers to Derecho y Literature as “one of the greatest contemporary European studies on law and literature” (xiii). Read more…>>

9 Short Cryptography Papers (Numbers 1-3) by A. Phoenix

SirBacon.org is proud to share the 9 Paper Cryptographic Series by A. Phoenix.

Below are the first three papers:


Captain Powell, A Member of US Cipher Intelligence, The Fraudulent Friedmans, and his Endorsement of Elizabeth Wells Gallup’s Decipherment of the Bacon Biliteral Cipher in the Shakespeare First Folio

The fourteen-page pamphlet The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon published by the Riverbank Laboratories written by J. A. Powell is of a great deal of interest. This work gives rise to a series of subtle deceptions perpetrated by the Friedmans designed to withhold important information about its author and his undoubted expertise in the area of codes and ciphers in general and the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher in particular. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/CAPTAIN POWELL.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

The Two Heads of French Cipher Intelligence and the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher Deciphered by Elizabeth Wells Gallup Revealing Bacon is Shakespeare

From before the turn of the twentieth century there had been a growing consensus among German, and to a lesser extent, Dutch academics that Bacon was in fact the secret author of the Shakespeare works. The endorsement of Gallup’s decipherments by General Cartier had the striking effect of vigorously renewing the debate in post war France. Opinion, as it had been in Germany and Holland was divided, with opposing views warmly expressed in numerous articles, some it has to be said more scholarly than others. General Cartier’s endorsement of the bi-literal cipher was also not to go unnoticed in the close knit world of cryptology. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/LANGE AND SOUDART.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

Herbert O. Yardley, Head of MI-8 (the codes and ciphers Bureau), and the Bacon Bi-literal, Simple, and Kay Cipher Systems Revealing Bacon is Shakespeare

During the time Riverbank Cipher Department headed by William and Elizebeth Friedman was carrying out code and cipher work for the US government and various other federal agencies plans had secretly been underfoot in Washington to establish a Cipher Bureau of its own. On 10th June 1917 the first government Cipher Bureau under Military Intelligence 8 (MI-8) was established in Washington by the War Department with Major Ralph H. Van Deman, Director of Military Intelligence, appointing Herbert O. Yardley, as its first head. Read more >>

SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/YARDLEY.pdf

May 2024

A. Phoenix

4in1. Mask of Shakespeare, Mysteries of Bacon, Book by Cartier, Secrets of the NSA

The official web site of the book “4in1“:

4in1.ws

4in1. Mask of Shakespeare, Mysteries of Bacon, Book by Cartier, Secrets of the NSA

In 1938, the authoritative European cryptographer, General François Cartier, who headed the cryptographic service of France military during WWI, published an analytical book “The Problem of Cryptography and History.”

This entire work was dedicated to recovering the secret autobiography of Francis Bacon, which was encrypted using his own biliteral cipher and embedded in parts across numerous printed books by various authors of the Elizabethan era.

Read more…>>

A. Phoenix read and reviewed the book:

FRANCIS BACON, THE BACON BI-LITERAL DECIPHERMENTS OF GENERAL FRANCOIS CARTIER HEAD OF THE FRENCH CIPHER INTELLIGENCE SERVICE, THE FRAUDULENT FRIEDMANS, AND A WORK WRITTEN BY A FORMER MEMBER OF THE RUSSIAN INTELLIGENCE SERVICES

4in1

Mask of Shakespeare

Mysteries of Bacon

Book by Cartier

Secrets of the NSA

(Second Edition, 2023 translated from the Russian)

https://4in1.ws/

‘In the foundations of cryptography as a solid scientific computer mathematical discipline there lies a big Mystery of the occult mystical sense. By a long-standing tradition, it is forbidden to talk about this Mystery. But by whom it is forbidden and on what grounds, actually, no one knows..’

Due to the multi-layered depth and complexity of this work it would be virtually impossible to do it justice in a brief review or summary of its interconnected themes. This landmark work is a milestone in Bacon-Shakespeare scholarship and its secret hidden links with British, US & French Intelligence, the Folger Shakespeare Library and its learned journal the Shakespeare Quarterly, and numerous individuals working for these Agencies and Institutions, that were or became involved in Bacon-Shakespeare scholarship. This indispensable work in particular focuses upon two such individuals William F. Friedman and Francois Cartier, the one world famous in the realms of Bacon-Shakespeare cryptology and the other (as the author of this work repeatedly emphasizes) almost completely written out of the Bacon-Shakespeare canon.

In support of its central contentions, it contains little known and difficult to access documents, evidence and facts, and provides links to specialised cryptological and intelligence publications and articles, and other obscure sources of information that have remained suppressed or hidden for decades and in some instances for more than a century.

I have written an article on the subject which I have placed on Academia:

Francis_Bacon_the_Bacon_Bi_literal_Decip-1.pdf

Robin Browne, Baconian (1941-2024)

 

Sirbacon.org wishes to acknowledge the passing of Robin Browne,(1941-2024) a long time British Baconian and member of the Francis Bacon Society, who had an outstanding career as a cinematographer.

Featured in the latest June 2024 FBS newsletter, Robin Browne, had a life-long interest in Francis Bacon and the Shakespeare Authorship question with a deep interest in Baconian codes and ciphers.

See his essays : XXII First Folio : The Smoking Gun and XXIII First Folio Fobia:
FrancisBaconSociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

Here is his Obituary in The Guardian:

Robin Browne obituary

Read more…>>

The Bacon Shakespeare Question

 
 

Cockburn, N. B., The Bacon Shakespeare Question The Baconian Theory Made Sane, The Francis Bacon Society edition, 2024, pp.740.

 

The Bacon Shakespeare Question was first printed in 1998 and for many years now has been out of print. Barrister Nigel B Cockburn generously left the copyright for his work to the Francis Bacon Society and this year with the support of its members, the Society has taken the decision to re-print it in order to rightly make it available to a new generation of enquirers into the Bacon Shakespeare Question.

With a new biography of the author by the Society and new foreword by American lawyer and author Christina G. Waldman, The Francis Bacon Society 2024 edition is now available once more.

 

‘Shakespeare was a Lawyer’ – Judge Nathaniel Holmes

‘If anything is certain in regard to the Sonnets, the Poems, and the Plays, it is certain that the author was a Lawyer’ – Judge Webb

The Bacon Shakespeare Question by the late Nigel B. Cockburn barrister of the Inner Temple builds a formidable, evidence-based case in favour of Sir Francis Bacon of Gray’s Inn’s authorship of Shakespeare. ‘The best single book ever written on the subject’.

New edition is available here:
FrancisBaconSociety.co.uk/bookstore/the-bacon-shakespeare-question/

Cockburn, N. B., The Bacon Shakespeare Question The Baconian Theory Made Sane, The Francis Bacon Society edition, 2024

Reviewed by Mather Walker

SirBacon.org/mcockburnreview.htm

Book Review by Mather Walker

Nine Primary Images linking Francis Bacon to the Shakespeare Works

by A. Phoenix.


Paper: https://SirBacon.org/downloads/aphoenix/NINE-PRIMARY-IMAGES.pdf

  1. The second Rosicrucian manifesto the Confessio Fraternitatis (1615) reveals that the actor William Shakspere of Stratford is an Impostor
  2. The Plempii Emblem (1616) Depicting Fortune Standing on a Globe raising up Francis Bacon and pushing down his Literary Mask the actor William Shakspere of Stratford
  3. The frontispiece to Speculum Sophicum Rhodo-Stauroticum (1618) depicting Francis Bacon and his Literary Mask William Shakspere of Stratford
  4. The title page of Gustav Selenus’ extremely rare Cryptomenytices et Cryptographiae Libri IX (1624), depicting Francis Bacon giving his literary mask William Shakspere one of his Shakespeare plays to be performed at the Globe Theatre
  5. The 1645 title page of De Augmentis Scientiarum showing Bacon with his hand controlling his literary mask the actor Shakpere of Stratford
  6. In the address To the Reader prefixed to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio, Ben Jonson reveals in an anagram that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare
  7. In the verse To the memory of my beloued, The Avthor Mr. William Shakespeare Ben Jonson again reveals in an anagram that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare
  8. The outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (known as the Northumberland Manuscript) that originally contained copies of his two Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III
  9. The frontispiece of Bacon’s La Saggesse Mysterieuse (1641) depicting Pallas Athena, the Shaker of the Spear from whence he adopted his nom de plume Shakespeare

See here for more information:

Video:

Six Primary Documents Confirming Francis Bacon is Shakespeare

by A. Phoenix.


Many people who are unfamiliar with Baconian research seem to believe that the Baconian evidence for Francis Bacon writing the Shakespeare works is all based on various cipher and code evidence of differing and various complexities. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Here are six pieces of documentary evidence that are not based on ciphers, codes or anagrams and everything to do with hard, primary documentary evidence that firmly links Francis Bacon to the Shakespeare Works.

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Essay: Thomas Shelton and Hamet Benengeli

 
 

by Francis Carr

If Don Quixote was not written by Miguel de Cervantes, who was the real author?

There is no evidence that it came from the pen of any of Cervantes’ contemporaries in Spain. None of his private letters have come down to us; there is no evidence that another Spanish author is involved.

It is in Don Quixote, in the work itself, that we may find an answer to the question of authorship. If someone wrote this novel using the name of Cervantes, it is possible that some clues have been deliberately placed in the text.

The author, whoever he was, speaks to us, his readers, in his Preface. In the very first page he takes the trouble to point out that there is some problem of authorship, or fatherhood. Of course, this may be merely a device, a pose but it may not be.

Though in shew a Father, yet in truth but a stepfather to Don Quixote.

If this were the only reference to another man as the author, the real father, this mention of stepfatherhood could be ignored. But another name is mentioned over and over again. In Chapter 1 of Book 2 of the First Part in Shelton’s translation (Chapter 9 of the modern Penguin translation by J. M. Cohen, P77) we read:

The historie of Don Quixote of the Mancha, written by Cyd Hamet Benengeli, an Arabicall Historiographer.

Read more of Carr’s essay…>>

Don Quixote resource list by A. Phoenix


A. Phoenix list of Don Quixote references

Bringing home Bacon Shakespeare Cervantes

by Lawrence Gerald

Bringing home Bacon Shakespeare Cervantes

“Bringing Home Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes.”

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES

A word from Lawrence Gerald
March 2024

I visited the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont CA on January 22, 1991. It was my only visit there and it was during their annual Francis Bacon Birthday Celebration that was open to the public. I had been in touch with the curator, Elizabeth Wrigley who had governed for over 50 years an https://sirbacon.org/links/wrigley.htm and she gave me full permission to check out the books.

I remember how eager I was to peruse the Library’s stacks in this Disneyworld of Baconiana. Out of all the hundreds and hundreds of books the one that struck me the most was discovering this book in German, Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes by Alfred Von Weber-Ebenhof. I didn’t know this book existed. It was published in Austria in 1917 and it was the first book published that challenged the authorship of Cervantes’ Don Quixote.

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES by Alfred von Weber-Ebenhoff

I remember calling my friend Steven Marble a longtime Baconian that I was introduced to by Peter Dawkins, and telling him about this book and asking him if he had heard about it. Steven said no he hadn’t known about the book and I asked him if he ever finds anything more about the book could you please let me know.

A month goes by and I will never forget this moment when I get a call from Steven telling me I’m not going to believe what had transpired since our last call. With the help of Elizabeth Wrigley, Steven was introduced to Emily who turns out was an old acquaintance who wanted to find a new home for her father’s Baconian library. Turns out Emily’s father was Arthur Cornwall author of his own book on Bacon, that combined ciphers and an investigation into Bacon’s life beyond his alleged death in 1626.
Cornwall, Arthur. Francis the First Unacknowledged King of Great Britain and Ireland. 1936.

Included in the books being donated to Steven by Emily was an English translation of Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes by Weber Ebenhof ! Arthur Cornwall had translated the book during the 1930’s from the German to English. It was the only English copy in the world, and it was unpublished. Wow. What a tangled web we weave.

Also, please read Don Elfenbein’s wonderful Book Review of Bacon Shakespeare and Cervantes. (See below in this article.)

I want to thank Steven Marble for his generous permission to allow publishing the book on sirbacon.org and I am grateful to Dr John Torbert, who took on the digitizing of the Cornwall English translation for his selfless efforts and taking the time to bring this into fruition. Also huge thanks to Rob Fowler, who helped guide the formatting and preparation of the text for the readers of sirbacon.org

I would also like to acknowledge all the previous writers who shared their expertise on the subject of Don Quixote authorship in Baconiana the published Journal of the Francis Bacon Society who are about to celebrate 138 years of continued existence.
https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/
This includes Francis Carr who was willing to risk his reputation for where his research led him and published the second explosive book on the topic Who Wrote Don Quxiote ? It took Carr 12 years to endure ridicule and closed doors before having published his book in 2004 because it’s that controversial and people are biased from their uneducated culture bound opinions and already made up minds. The authorship of Don Quixote remains controversial and upsetting for some, to be dismissed by others, while contemplated, digested and enjoyed by many more who have an open mind in search for truth.

It’s now been 33 years since I discovered the book in the stacks of the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont, CA , a 107 years since Ebenhof published his book and around 94 years since Cornwall translated it from German.

So there you have it the story how this book came to be and now sirbacon.org is happy to present for the first time the English translation of Alfred Von Weber-Ebenhof’s Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes.

A word from -Steven Marble

Being a long-time student of Baconiana, I started my investigation in 1974 with the introduction of Francis Bacon as the true author of the Shakespeare canon, a Rosicrucian, editor of the King James Version of the Bible, and so on. This fascination led further into the mysterious Mr. Bacon’s life in Ojai where I was living from 1976 through 1980. Through my friend Lucy Colson, I became acquainted with her mother Emily and the unique life she had lived accompanying her father Arthur Cornwall on his quest to discover whether Francis had died where and when he was reputed to have 1626. As a family friend, I even became Emily and her husband’s gardener for a while.

As fate would have it, while visiting Elizabeth Wrigley at the Francis Bacon Library, I let her know that I was hoping to buy a copy of Baxter’s The Greatest of Literary Problems: The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works to add to my research collection. Elizabeth let me know that she had received a call from a lady in Ojai that was looking to sell her library of Baconiana books and manuscripts. And that lady was my old acquaintance, Emily.

With amazed gratitude I received her father’s entire research library which I still have to this day with my own collection. The purpose for all this collecting and study was to create a series for television. Those thoughts remain, after attempting three times to launch such a dream project, I have moved on to other endeavors for now.

Review of Bacon–Shakespeare–Cervantes, book two

by Alfred von Weber-Ebenhof
and translated by Arthur B. Cornwall
Reviewed by Donald Elfenbein*

* Don Elfenbein is a former law and philosophy professor and writing instructor, a freelance editor, an independent researcher, and the author of The Play That Solves the Shakespeare Authorship Mystery: The Allegory of Francis Bacon’s Natural Philosophy in The Tempest (Lulu Press, 2023). He earned an A.B. magna cum laude in developmental psychology at Harvard College and also holds a J.D. from the same university. He has been a student of the Shakespeare authorship question for many years.

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES
(FRANCIS TUDOR)

A criticism upon the
Shaksper and Cervantes Festivals

By
Alfred von Weber-Ebenhoff

(Translated into English by Arthur B. Cornwall)

Anzengruber Publishing House, Suschitzky Brothers

Leipzig-Vienna 1917

The Man Who Saw Through Time : Loren Eisley’s “Francis Bacon and the Modern Dilemma”

Francis Bacon and the Modern Dilemma
by Loren Eisehy

CONTENTS

1 / THE MAN WHO SAW THROUGH TIME – 2

2 / BACON AS SCIENTIST AND EDUCATOR – 31

3 / BACON AND THE MODERN DILEMMA – 63

BIBLIOGRAPHY – 97

A New Book by A. Phoenix

by A. Phoenix.


The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument

In 1623 Francis Bacon with his scriptorium or literary workshop housed at Gorhambury staffed by his good pens among them the poet George Herbert and the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson, were busy working on the Shakespeare First Folio which was then making its way through the Jaggard printing house.

On its publication in November 1623, it carried a dedication to the Grand Master of England William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke and his brother Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery.

It was only a little over a year after the publication of his Shakespeare First Folio that Bacon started preparing for his final Last Will and Testament.

After consultations with those close to him and dealing with some practical arrangements he commenced the formal process of making a will on 23 May 1625 of such detail and complexity that it was not completed until six months later in the December. In an earlier draft of his will the lawyer Edward Herbert (a cousin of the poet George Herbert a contributor to the Memoriae and the Herbert brothers to whom Bacon dedicated the Shakespeare First Folio) was charged with overseeing which of his manuscripts should be published and which should be suppressed. In the final document Bacon addresses himself to future ages followed by some very pregnant instructions still shrouded in secrecy and unresolved to the present day. He bequeaths to the care of Bishop of London John Williams (a contributor to the Memoriae) his letters, speeches and other papers touching matters of state some of which Bacon did not want published but nevertheless wished them to be kept in private hands in safe keeping. By this Bacon meant to use his own words of reserving part to a private succession, namely his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, who down the centuries have very carefully watched over Bacon’s secret life and writings, including the manuscripts of his Shakespeare poems and plays. In his will he also desired his executors Sir John Constable and Sir William Boswell (a contributor to the Memoriae) to take into their possession all his papers in his cabinets, boxes, and presses, and to seal them up until they had the leisure to peruse them. In December 1625 his last will and testament was signed in the presence of his private secretary and Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley, who had lived with Bacon for the last ten years of his life, who had access to the majority of his literary manuscripts, including the manuscripts of his Shakespeare plays, which were placed into his hands to be kept concealed from public view until his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood decide to reveal the hidden truth to posterity and the world.

In the months following Bacon’s death to the profane world his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and quietly issued a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum.

This rare and still virtually unknown work contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon, which his orthodox editors and biographers have simply glossed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare.

The Shakespeare monument at Stratford-upon-Avon secretly commissioned by Bacon to which the Memoriae is inextricably linked is replete with Rosicrucian-Freemasonry symbolism serving as a memorial to Francis Bacon our secret Shakespeare.

It knowingly echoes verses in the Memoriae, and as with the Shakespeare First Folio that is dedicated to the Grand Master of England, it is replete with Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic symbolism and cryptic devices, which read and deciphered repeatedly reveal and confirm that Bacon is Shakespeare.

Several centuries later the English translations of the Memoriae containing the 32 Latin verses portraying Bacon as Shakespeare are here made readily available and accessible for the first time, enabling Bacon and Shakespeare scholars, all interested students of English literature and the rest of the world, to read for themselves a work revealing the secret of the true authorship of the Shakespeare works, one kept from them for the last four hundred years.

Full paper: The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian.pdf

1 Minute Trailer
Latin verses confirm Francis Bacon as our Secret Shakespeare

Secret Bacon-Shakespeare Links – Bacon Verses, Shakespeare First Folio & The Stratford Monument

The Marriage of Elizabeth Tudor by Alfred Dodd

Sirbacon.org wishes to thank Dr. John Torbert for digitizing The Marriage of Elizabeth Tudor by Alfred Dodd and making it available for the readers of sirbacon.org

The Smoking Gun

by A. Phoenix.


Francis Bacon and his Unique Copy of the 1587 edition of Holinshed’s Chronicles
with Marginal Annotations in his own hand alongside passages used for
his Shakespeare Plays
The Smoking Gun of the True Authorship of the Shakespeare Works

HOLINSHED-SYNOPSIS.pdf

Full paper: FINAL-HOLINSHED.pdf

2 Minute Trailer – Where is ‘Shakespeare’s Holinshed’?

The Smoking Gun of the Shakespeare Authorship Question – Bacon’s copy of Shakespeare’s Holinshed

Critical Insights of Two Oxfordian Books.

by A. Phoenix.


downloads/aphoenix/LOONEY.pdf

J. THOMAS LOONEY FOUNDER OF THE DELUSIONAL OXFORDIAN THEORY

J. Thomas Looney originated the fallacious Oxfordian theory that Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford (1550-1604) was the true author of nearly all the Shakespeare poems and plays in his work “Shakespeare Identified” in Edward de Vere the seventeenth Earl of Oxford first published in 1920. The whole Oxfordian theory and all subsequent Oxfordian works are based upon and built from this publication right up to the present day. To mark its centenary The De Vere Society devoted the issue of its 2020 quarterly newsletter to whom it described as their ‘founding father’ J. Thomas Looney and his much-vaunted seminal work. The same year The Oxford Shakespeare Fellowship announced a new centenary edition of Shakespeare Identified edited by James A. Warren, which, without a trace of irony we are informed, ‘remains the most revolutionary book on Shakespeare ever written.’ Perhaps only Oxfordians could make such a grandiose claim for a book written without any bibliographical apparatus-without footnotes or references, nor a bibliography

Read more…>>

downloads/aphoenix/CB.pdf

Charles Beauclerk A Descendant of Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, the Founder and President of the De Vere Society

The leading light of the Oxfordian movement Charles Francis Topham de Vere Beauclerk (b. 1965), Earl of Burford, is heir apparent to Murray Beauclerk, fourteenth Duke of St Albans and is descended from Charles Beauclerk, the first Duke of St. Albans, the illegitimate son of Charles II and Nell Gwynne. He was educated at Eton College and Sherborne school before moving up to Hertford College, Oxford. Through his father he is related to Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford.

He is the Founder and President of the De Vere Society, former President of the Shakespeare Oxford Society, and trustee of the Shakespeare Authorship Trust.

Read more…>>

The Martrydom of Francis Bacon by Alfred Dodd

 


Despite the historic reality  there  are writers who still to this day that ignore the historical facts and out of ignorance, maybe jealousy, maintain that Bacon was guilty of bribery and prefer not to correct themselves. It is ironic that Edward Coke a long time nemesis of Francis Bacon, wrote : “The Slander of a dead man is a living fault,” when he had slandered Francis Bacon many times while both were alive. In Alfred Dodd’s book, The Martrydom of Francis Bacon : he clears Bacon’s name from the false bribery charges that Bacon HAD to plead guilty to in order to save King James from political turmoil. This book delves into the narrative account that led to Bacon’s 1621 impeachment as Chancellor of England. Bacon was a man of Honor and Integrity and because of his unjust impeachment this may have contributed to being another reason why he chose to remain anonymous when the Shakespeare First Folio came out 2 years later in 1623. The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon along with the Nieves Mathews, seminal ” Francis Bacon History of a Character Assassination” nmathewsbook vindicate Bacon’s innocence. Sirbacon.org also would like to thank Dr. John Torbert, for his dedication and contribution in digitizing the Martyrdom book.

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Challenging the Lie in a Free Society: Even in Shakespeare Authorship Studies?

by Christina G. Waldman


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My late friend Sam had two favorite authors, William Butler Yeats and Alexandr Solzhenitsyn. The latter wrote One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and The Gulag Archipelago. I have not read the latter, but the former was memorable. Solzhenitsyn’s essay, “Live Not by Lies,” was published February 12, 1974, the day after he was exiled from Russia. In it, he urges people to “never knowingly support lies.” Read more…>>

First Folio 400 Year Anniversary 1623-2023

By Francis Bacon Society


Dear Members,

8th November 2023

Today is a very special day in that it marks 400 years since the Shakespeare First Folio was first entered on the Stationers’ Register back on 8th November 1623.

To commemorate this milestone anniversary, The Francis Bacon Society has published a special edition of the society’s journal Baconiana edited by A Phoenix.

It features many contrasting areas of research created by 12 contributors from different parts of the world which makes it a truly international publication.

Baconiana is now available to read here:

francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

Kind regards,

Susan McIlroy
Chair

The Francis Bacon Society

www.francisbaconsociety.co.uk

Youtube:

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Registered charity no. 209426

New website: SpearshakerProductions.com

 


The Spearshaker website is now live www.SpearshakerProductions.com 

 

The Secret Life and Writings of Francis Bacon in 39 Shakespeare Plays and Poems

by A. Phoenix.


downloads/aphoenix/PLAYS-FINAL.pdf

The beginning, experience and the evolving circumstances of the life and mind of a poet and dramatist inevitably pours itself into all great works of art. It illuminates every sinew of its portraiture and canvas infusing it with an unmistakable emotional, psychological and intellectual DNA. If you truly know the man, his mind and acknowledged writings, his sublime incomparable poetry and drama written in the name of another is immediately apparent, emitting a brilliant light of truth that is at once unambiguous, compelling and certain.

The great philosopher-poet Francis Tudor Bacon was the eldest concealed royal son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and elder brother of their other royal son Robert Tudor Devereux. He was secretly adopted at birth by her Lord Keeper of the Realm Sir Nicholas Bacon and wife Lady Anne Cooke Bacon.

In his early years he spent his time growing up between the Bacon family estate at Gorhambury and York House on the Strand the official residence of his father Lord Keeper Bacon next to York Place, the royal palace of Queen Elizabeth. From an early age at the Elizabethan court, he grew up in the company of his royal mother and the nobility of the kingdom and those of other countries and states from all over the continent of Europe, surrounded by English and foreign ambassadors and diplomats, and all those great and learned minds the times had to offer. The majority of whom were astonished by the prodigious young man in their midst. It was said by one of his early biographers (who knew of what he spoke) at the age of twelve years old he possessed a mind that was even then beyond the capacity of his peers.

His royal antecedents profoundly engaged his all-encompassing mind and intellect which he afterwards drew upon for his Shakespeare English History Plays with eight of these covering the reigns of Richard II to Richard III whose defeat at Bosworth marked the union of the Roses and beginning of the Tudor dynasty ushered in by his great-grandfather Henry VII, about whom he wrote a celebrated prose history. This was followed chronologically by his Shakespeare play Henry VIII, with its famous scene depicting the birth of his mother Queen Elizabeth, about whom would, he says, in reference to himself, create an heir, who would make new nations, as the concealed Father of our Modern World.    

Following his return from France during which time Bacon had been involved in a great love affair with Prince Marguerite, the inspiration for Romeo and Juliet the greatest love story ever told, he was admitted to Gray’s Inn from where he wrote his early Shakespeare plays for which he drew upon his own personal experiences and circumstances.  With the scene in the Temple Garden in I Henry VI which portrays the beginning of the War of the Roses, with parts of 2 Henry VI located at St Albans, the location of his Gorhambury estate, blessed with St Albans Cathedral which he regularly visited, the final resting place of Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, the dominant figure in the first three acts of the play. Then there was The Taming of the Shrew in which in its second version Bacon names it titular characters Petruccio and Kate, after the Bacon family scribe Petruccio Ubaldini and his aunt Katherine Cooke Killigrew, younger sister of Lady Bacon, with Petruccio’s father named Antonio, the Italian form of the name of his brother Anthony Bacon, two of whose household servant are named Nicholas and Nathaniel, after his elder half-brothers Sir Nicholas and Sir Natheniel Bacon (no I am not making this up!). Characters with the names of Anthony and Nathaniel also made appearances in Loves Labours Lost. With Anthony Bacon who repeatedly paid off the debts of his beloved brother Francis, the titular character of The Merchant of Venice in which its key characters Antonio and Bassanio mirror the relationship and circumstances of Anthony and Francis Bacon before, during and after the time of the play.

In the history play King John the royal Bastard Sir Philip Faulconbridge (F Bacon) is a portrait of its author the royal bastard Francis Tudor Bacon. The royal bastard child that Titania Queen Elizabeth and Oberon Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester fight over in A Midsummer Nights Dream.  In As You Like It Rosalind, the daughter of Duke Senior also corresponds to Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester shadows the figures of Duke Senior and Sir Rowland de Boys, with their son Robert Tudor Devereux reflected in the usurping brother Duke Frederick and the character of Orlando, youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys. Dramatically disguised figures or allusions to Robert Tudor Devereux also appear in Henry V, Troilus and Cressida, Coriolanus and Antony and Cleopatra.

As one might expect he saved the best roles for himself not least the greatest of all Shakespearean roles, in a very personal tragedy that tells the tale of its author a disinherited royal prince Francis Tudor Bacon in the towering shape of Hamlet who is denied his rightful kingship by his mother Queen Elizabeth and the exhaustion and death of the Tudor dynasty. In Measure for Measure, he is the God-like Rosicrucian figure of Duke Vincentio one of the longest and most complex roles in the Shakespeare canon with the scientific-philosopher Prospero in the Tempest similarly a disguised dramatic portrait made in the image of his creator the scientific-philosopher Francis Tudor Bacon, the Founding Father of Modern Science and the Modern World.

With this and much more of the secret life and writings of Francis Bacon Tudor inserted by himself into his Shakespeare poems and plays, dispersed throughout the whole canon.

All of it for hundreds of years hidden in plain sight before our very own eyes.

LORD SUCH FOOLS THESE MORTALS BE.

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 7

Part 7 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.


The Hidden Baconian Acrostics and Anagrams in the Shakespeare First Folio

1 Minute Trailer Secret Signatures in the Shakespeare First Folio

PAPER 1:

The Hidden Baconian Acrostics and Anagrams in the Shakespeare First Folio

VIDEO 1:

https://youtu.be/wTR_gqloCWs?si=mrfbwfmWM4HEr-2a

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 6

Part 6 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.


To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & and the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

1 Minute Trailer The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument. . . 

PAPER 1:

To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & and the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

VIDEO 1:

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo?si=TO3DTkYEHvJJ2aPS

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 5

Part 5 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.


To the memory of my beloued, The Avthor Mr. William Shakespeare signed by Ben Jonson

2 Minute Trailer Rare Ben Jonson

Honest Rare Ben Jonson is the star witness for the Stratfordians who claim he was no liar and would not have been party to any deception where in fact the very opposite is demonstrably the case.

The evidence revealed in this article reveals that the great Ben Jonson the lover of ciphers, anagrams, and the art of ambiguity participated in the most remarkable literary ludibrium (a veritable comedy, farce, illusion, etc) in the history of humankind, that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere of Stratford was Shakespeare, the greatest poet and dramatist of all time.

By his own admission Ben lied when the circumstances demanded it and Professor Riggs states that he frequently ‘gulls his audience, but Jonson’s falsehood has the capacity to educate as well as to delude.’
Honest Ben Jonson was completely capable of secrecy and ambiguity and in his epistle addressed to his beloved author in the First Folio, he repeatedly conveys to us that his confidante and Rosicrucian brother Francis Bacon is our Secret Shakespeare.

This gives lie to the Stratfordian fraud maintained and perpetrated by orthodox Shakespeare scholars who directly and indirectly benefit from the transparent deception that William Shakspere wrote the Shakespeare works.

 

PAPER 1:

To the memory of my beloued, The Avthor Mr. William Shakespeare signed by Ben Jonson

VIDEO 1:

https://youtu.be/WXH465vVKYs

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 4

Part 4 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.


The Dedication to the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’ and the address To the great Variety of Readers signed in the names of Heminges and Condell

1 Minute Trailer – The Men Who Gave us Shakespeare?

The whole bedrock of the Shakespeare First Folio is predicated on the illusion that seven years after the death of William Shakspere of Stratford his acting friends John Heminges and Henry Condell edited the First Folio and wrote its dedication to William and Philip Herbert and the address to The Great Variety of Readers, to which their names are signed. This was originally all part of the charade created by Bacon and his divine Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood to conceal his true authorship behind the mask of William Shakspere. Of course, Heminges and Condell, did not organise and oversee the enormous enterprise and production of the First Folio, and nor did they write the two epistles to which their names are attached.

Yet even though this now self-evident absurd nonsense has long and repeatedly been exposed for what it is, this false and fraudulent narrative is still perpetrated by mainstream biographers of William Shakspere of Stratford and Stratfordian authors of books on the Shakespeare First Folio, to the present day. All safe in the knowledge the ordinary schoolmen, the casual student and virtually the rest of the world at large, remain ignorant of this central Stratfordian falsehood and lie that Heminges and Condell oversaw the enterprise of the First Folio as a tribute to their fellow actor William Shakspere.

This, despite the fact, that other overlooked and ignored Shakespeare editors and academics in less well-known or accessible publications have long maintained that Heminges and Condell only lent their names to the vast enterprise and that the two epistles signed in their names were most likely written by Ben Jonson. This is all but ignored by modern so-called Stratfordian authorities because when the false and fraudulent fiction that Heminges and Condell oversaw the production of the First Folio is exposed for what it really is it begs the key critical question just who were responsible for producing it behind a wall of silence and secrecy?

The answer to the question is, the production of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio was organised by its author Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood from his country estate at Gorhambury assisted by his good pens including its editor and contributor Ben Jonson who was living with Bacon at the time it was progressing through the Jaggard printing presses. The actors Heminges and Condell did no more than allow their names to be associated with the Shakespeare First Folio and it was Bacon and Jonson who were responsible for producing and composing the two epistles signed in their names. As will be seen, Heminges and Condell did not participate in the production of the First Folio which removes the central plank of the Stratfordian fiction that William Shakspere wrote the Shakespeare works.

 

PAPER 1:

The Dedication to the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’ the Grand Master of England William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke and Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery

VIDEO 1:

https://youtu.be/v82gTnhCkwI

 

PAPER 2:

To the great Variety of Readers signed in the names of Heminges and Condell

VIDEO 2:

https://youtu.be/4MK-xRdzfks

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

Shakespeare Authorship Question: Unravelling the Mystery

Who wrote the plays and why?

by Kate Cassidy


In 1621, Sir Francis Bacon celebrated his 60th birthday. His close friend Ben Jonson penned a tribute poem that hinted at a mysterious achievement. “Hail, happy Genius of this ancient pile! How comes it all things so about thee smile? The fire, the wine, the men! and in the midst, Thou stand’st as if some Mystery thou did’st!”

Jonson’s cryptic words suggest Bacon had accomplished something monumental, yet undisclosed.

The Baconian belief is that this “mystery” relates to the authorship of the Shakespeare plays and sonnets. On SirBacon.org’s What’s New we feature a fascinating article by Kate Cassidy, which will be of interest to those who are completely new to the authorship question, and to anyone who wishes to understand why Bacon would have written the works in Shakespeare’s name and concealed his involvement.

https://the-power-paradox.shorthandstories.com/the-shakespeare-authorship-question-unravelling-the-mystery/index.html

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 3

Part 3 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.


THE SECRET OF THE DROESHOUT MASK SYNOPSIS

1 Minute Trailer The Secret of the Droeshout Mask

To the present day the life of Martin Droeshout the enigmatic engraver of the Droeshout engraving prefixed to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is completely shrouded in secrecy and mystery. The silence is deafening. What could be the reason for all this secrecy and silence?

The key central reason is the Droeshout engraving on the title page of the Shakespeare First Folio is a mask behind which its concealed author Francis Bacon is hidden in plain sight, which when removed reveals the truth behind the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion and ludibrium that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere was the author of the greatest literature in the history of the world.

Modern orthodox Shakespeare scholars have conspired in an enormous fraudulent conspiracy and very deliberately lied to the world about the so-called incompetence of its engraver Martin Droeshout to maintain the fiction and illusion William Shakspere wrote the Shakespeare plays.

The key elements of any fraud are very often simple and relatively easy to achieve and execute. The orthodox fraudulent Stratfordian scholar has numerous tools at their disposal. Firstly, they are simply able to take advantage of the trust of their naive uncritical readership who are easily persuaded by a perceived authoritative figure or so-called expert with the accompanying title of professor whose works are published by a prestigious university press. Pitifully, this itself is usually sufficient. Or alternatively, in the face of irrefutable facts and evidence the common response of orthodox Stratfordian scholars is either to simply maintain a wall of silence, or resort to crude systematic suppression and omission. Then there is their well-practiced method of arbitrary distortion and dismissal. Not forgetting of course, the blunt instrument of downright lies and mendacity, all of it skilfully woven into their false, deceitful, and fraudulent narratives.

For centuries the Stratfordian authorities have misled and lied to the world about the one critical fact literally staring us all in the face-the Droeshout engraving is very obviously and irrefutably a mask. The reason why they have repeatedly lied to the world and denied it is a mask is because it would immediately expose the illusion William Shakspere of Stratford wrote the Shakespeare works which in a single devastating and catastrophic stroke would bring the whole fraudulent Stratfordian edifice crashing down all around them.

The secret relationship which has remained hidden for centuries between Francis Bacon and Martin Droeshout the engraver responsible for the iconic image that adorns the title page of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is here revealed for the first time, bringing out of the shadows into the brilliant light of day, our sublime poet-dramatist concealed behind the Droeshout mask, exposing and collapsing the greatest literary fraud of all time.

 

PAPER 1:

The Title Page and Droeshout Mask of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio Concealing its Secret Author Francis Bacon

VIDEO 1:

https://youtu.be/v82gTnhCkwI

 

PAPER 2:

To The Reader Prefixed to the Shakespeare First Folio Opposite the Droeshout Mask signed with the initials B. I. for Ben Jonson

VIDEO 2:

https://youtu.be/v82gTnhCkwI

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

Why Did Elizabeth Winkler Not Interview Any Baconians?

by Christina G. Waldman


https://christinagwaldman.com/2023/07/05/why-did-elizabeth-winkler-not-interview-any-baconians/

July 5, 2023.

Something must be said about Elizabeth Winkler’s new book, Shakespeare Was a Woman and Other Heresies in which she sets out–one would assume–to accurately and fairly present the current status of the Shakespeare authorship controversy. This would be a worthy goal. However, although she, an American journalist, interviewed people who might colloquially be called “Stratfordians,” “Oxfordians” (three of them), a “Marlovian,” general Shakespeare authorship doubters, and at least one indifferent, she did not interview any currently researching and writing Baconians! With the internet, we are not that hard to find. Unfortunately, this omission may mislead readers unfamiliar with the topic into assuming no one believes Bacon may have written Shakespeare anymore, or that no one is currently researching the evidence. Perhaps she would like to visit SirBacon.org which has recently hosted “The A. Phoenix PDF Library of Works,” https://sirbacon.org/the-a-phoenix-pdf-library-of-works/.

Yes, Winkler interviewed Mark Rylance the Shakespearean actor, but he did not come across in her book as a “Baconian” per se, but rather as a general doubter and, perhaps, “the most prominent person championing the idea of female authorship today” (p. 279). Even James Shapiro in his 2010 book Contested Will (Simon & Schuster) pointed readers to two resources for further reading on the case for Bacon: SirBacon.org and the (now late) Irish humanist Brian McClinton’s book, The Shakespeare Conspiracies: A 400-Year Web of Myth and Deceit, 2d ed. (Belfast: Shanway Press, 2008) (Shapiro, p. 282). There are other books, of course, that could be mentioned, such as the late British barrister N. B. Cockburn’s The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Question Made Sane (740 pp., 1998), Peter Dawkins, The Shakespeare Enigma (London: Polair Press, 2004), and my own, Francis Bacon’s Hidden Hand in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice: A Study of Law, Rhetoric, and Authorship (New York: Algora Publishing, 2018).

It is interesting that Winkler and Shapiro’s publisher is Simon & Schuster, publisher for the Folger Shakespeare Library which has long held to a “Stratfordian” view, although they have stated: “we don’t really know what Shakespeare’s handwriting looks like.” (Folger Shakespeare Library Staff and Paul Werstine,“Shakespeare’s Handwriting: Hand D in The Booke of Sir Thomas More,” Shakespeare Documented, Folger Shakespeare Library, https://shakespearedocumented.folger.edu/resource/document/shakespeares-handwriting-hand-d-booke-sir-thomas-more, accessed July 7, 2023). Except, that may not be true, for the highly-respected forensic expert Maureen Ward-Gandy in her 1992 report determined, to a high degree of probability, that a play fragment found in binder’s waste in a 1586 copy of Homer’s Odyssey (It was a draft scene analogous to The First Part of Henry the Fourth) was in Francis Bacon’s own handwriting. It is printed in full for the first time in my book, and is also now available at SirBacon.org (Maureen Ward-Gandy, “Elizabethan Era Writing Comparison for Identification of Common Authorship,” Oct. 11, 2022, https://sirbacon.org/elizabeth-era-writing-comparison-for-identification-of-common-authorship/).

While Winkler mentions a 2019 book published by Routledge, Francis Bacon’s Contribution to Shakespeare), she leaves out the author’s name! It is Barry R. Clarke who has a Ph.D. in Shakespeare Studies from Brunel University. Nor does she mention Peter Dawkins’ recent book, Second-Seeing Shakespeare: Stay Passenger: “why goest thou by so fast?” (April 6, 2020, Kindle) or, if I am not mistaken, mention him by name. Instead, she refers to him (presumably) as “a Baconian researcher.” Dawkins is the founder/principal of the Francis Bacon Research Trust and its educational website. The Francis Bacon Society publishes videos on Youtube. The videos made by Jono Freeman are especially informative and entertaining. I wonder if Winkler has ever heard of them, or of my book? Through whose eyes is she seeing the authorship question?

There is other evidence of bias (Is it because he was born into a noble family? But his father, Sir Nicholas Bacon, was the son of a commoner.). She refers to the Northumberland Manuscript, an important piece of Baconian evidence because it bears the names of Bacon and Shakespeare together, as “a mass of “chaotic scribblings” (p. 163) (but see, e.g., “The Northumberland Manuscript: Bacon and Shakespeare Manuscripts in One Portfolio!” https://sirbacon.org/links/northumberland.html). She reported Oxfordian interpretations of the evidence, related by Oxfordians she interviewed, as if they were the only interpretations–unaware of, or considering there might be, other interpretations.

For example, she discusses Hall and Marston’s allusions to “Labeo” in their 16th century satires. There are several Labeos. Winkler knows of the poet Labeo, Labeo Attius (67-68), but not, apparently, of the great Roman jurist, Marcus Antistius Labeo, whose life parallels Bacon’s in notable ways (see my book, Francis Bacon’s Hidden Hand, pp. 99-100). The Latin words labefacio (to cause to shake, to totter) and labefacto (to shake violently) make an interesting association with the name, something Virgil and other writers of his time used to do. (See James J. O’Hara, True Names: Vergil and the Alexandrian Tradition of Etymological Wordplay (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press 2017 [1996]). It seems Hall and Marson were on to this rhetorical device as well.

Arguably, any connection between Shakespeare and the law is one which points strongly to Francis Bacon, more than to any other “candidate” for Shakespeare authorship. Even Tom Regnier, the late “Oxfordian” researcher and a lawyer, has acknowledged the obvious, that Bacon’s legal accomplishments were much greater than Oxford’s (Thomas Regnier, “The Law in Hamlet: Death, Property, and the Pursuit of Justice (2011),” reprinted in Shakespeare and the Law: How the Bard’s Legal Knowledge Affects the Authorship Question, edited by Roger A. Strittmatter (June 2022), 231-251, 231. And no, Strittmatter did not make reference to my 2018 book, either.).

Bacon devoted much of his life to making lasting legal reforms to English law. He was a wise visionary humanitarian, arguably not the “stodgy old philosopher” Edward J. White saw him as, in trying to persuade readers that Bacon could not have been Shakespeare, ironically, while at the same time detailing an abundance of law found in Shakespeare, in his Commentaries on the Law in Shakespeare (St. Louis: F. H. Thomas, 2d ed. 1913), a book in which he was much assisted by a woman, Shakespeare lecturer, Mary A. Wadsworth, to whom he dedicated the book. Today she would probably be given co-authorial status.

Winkler also left important information out of her historical treatment. For example, in naming “Baconian” authors, she left out Constance Pott, founder of the Francis Bacon Society in 1866. Pott is the author of the first edition of Bacon’s writer’s notebook, the Promus, with all of its Shakespeare parallels. Did she mention Baconiana, the journal of the Francis Bacon Society (FBS) which has published the literary and historical research of its members since 1866? It can be accessed from the FBS website or SirBacon.org. A bibliography would have helped this book. SirBacon.org provides lengthy bibliographies of Baconian scholarship. She left out so many good writers. “It is hard to remember all, ungrateful to pass by any.” –Francis Bacon.

Arguably, if you only look where the light is shining, you won’t see what is hidden in the dark. Bacon was not just any nobleman penning poetry and plays. If the reason for the secrecy is because it was Bacon and we don’t look into the matter deeply enough, we will never solve the mystery. I am not saying Bacon was the only writer, but it is illogical to assume this stellar writer, a major literary figure in his time, did not play a role. The word “author” can be used in a broader sense for the person in charge of a large-scale literary project. Abbess Herrad of Hohenbourg referred herself as the “author” of the Hortus Deliciarum, a twelfth century encyclopedic work she compiled for the edification of the nuns at her convent, although she herself wrote relatively little of it (see Fiona J. Griffiths, The Garden of Delights: Reform and Renaissance for Women in the Twelfth Century (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2007).

In truth, there is no logical, factual reason that would make Bacon’s authorship of Shakespeare a factual impossibility. The two reasons that are usually given do not hold up under close scrutiny. Contrary to what is often said, for much of his life, Bacon did have the time to write plays and poems (and he had his “good pens” to help him). It was only after his cousin Robert Cecil died, during the reign of King James, that he was burdened with public office. Moreover, it is not fair to compare a person’s prose works with their poetry. Of course, there will be a difference in style! A person varies his/her/their writing style depending on what they are writing. One would especially expect this of a skilled writer, which Bacon was. James Shapiro observed in Contested Will that the only genre of writing at which Bacon did not try his hand was play-writing (p. 90). Isn’t that interesting. James Spedding, Bacon’s nineteenth century biographer and editor, observed that Bacon had the “fine phrensy of a poet,” intriguingly using Shakespeare’s phrase (see OpenSourceShakespeare.org).

Not all Baconians think alike. I can speak only for myself. The truth does not have a label or denomination, to make a religious analogy. But all who are researching need to keep an open mind. It is the facts that matter. In fact, it was Bacon who helped develop the modern meaning of what a valid fact is (See abstract, Barbara Shapiro, A Culture of Fact: England, 1550‒1720 (Cornell University Press). He wrote about the “four idols” that keep us from seeing things as they really are in his New Organon. Jesus spoke of such things as “motes” in our eyes. Bacon called them eidola from the Greek (hence informing his use of the word “idol”).

If people do not look into the case for Bacon deeply enough, I fear they risk trying to solve a puzzle that has missing pieces. This is a scholarly subject. It is unfortunate that a journalist, by not interviewing Baconians and giving their case equal time, did not present the Shakespeare authorship controversy as it stands today fairly and accurately. The Baconians were the first to challenge William Shaxpere of Stratford’s authorship. Many of the arguments of the Oxfordians are derivative of those first posited by Baconians (e.g., So Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford was a ward of Lord Burghley? So was Francis Bacon, after his father died in 1579. In fact, Burghley was Bacon’s uncle (Added 7-8-23: Burghley’s wife Mildred was the sister of Francis’s mother, Anne Bacon. All the daughters of Sir Anthony Cooke (tutor to Edward VI) had received a rigorous classical education from their father. Anne, a true scholar, translated Bishop John Jewel’s Apology for the Church of England (anonymously). She made sure her sons, too, received a rigorous classical education, even before they entered Cambridge.).

Critical thinking is imperative. If readers do not have sufficient background in the history of a topic such as this, they risk being misled. If you are looking for something that has been intentionally buried, you have to dig deep.

Granted, Winkler’s undertaking in this book was ambitious, and the goal of publicizing the aberrant “wall” against challenging the authorship of Shakespeare is worthy. The book seems to have touched a chord and to be have been well-received, generally, for the most part (by non-“Stratfordians,” at least). However, the reading public trusts those who write books to objectively give them the whole story; or at least refer them to other sources where they might find it, because no one writer or one book can do it all. Perhaps Winkler will agree with me that, the more we learn about this topic, the more we realize how much more there is to learn. However, getting better acquainted with all of Francis Bacon’s works is well worth the effort, in my opinion.

(First posted July 5, 2023. Slightly revised July 7, 2023; references added.)

https://christinagwaldman.com/2023/07/05/why-did-elizabeth-winkler-not-interview-any-baconians/

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 2

by A. Phoenix


Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian brother Ben Jonson Editor of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio

Part 2 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.

PAPER 2:

Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian brother Ben Jonson Editor of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio

VIDEO 2:

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 1

by A. Phoenix


The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion.

Part 1 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.

PAPER 1:

Francis Bacon His Rosicrucian Brotherhood & Literary Mask William Shakspere

VIDEO 1:

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

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The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion

by A. Phoenix


Announcing The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion. The book is available at
The_1623_Shakespeare_First_Folio_A_Baconian_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Illusion

Coming in at 404 pages we are also publishing selected chapters as smaller stand alone papers with accompanying videos. Each paper and video will concentrate on a selected facet of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio.

Follow the discussion on the B’Hive Forum here on SirBacon.org:

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/index.php?/forum/29-the-1623-shakespeare-first-folio-a-baconian-rosicrucian-freemasonic-illusion/

Introduction

On the 400th anniversary of the publication of the First Folio, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion uncovers and reveals unknown and untold secrets about the greatest work of literature in the history of humankind. Here for the first time, it brings forth the hidden and concealed connections of its secret author Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood with all the key members involved in its production, printing, and publication. It explores his hidden relationships with its printers William and Isaac Jaggard, and the other members of the First Folio consortium, John Smethwick, William Aspley, and its publisher Edward Blount. It is almost universally unknown that its dedicatee William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke was at the time of its dedication Grand Master of England, one of half of the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’, with his brother Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, whose joint open and hidden relationships with Bacon went back decades. The other important critical member in the production of the 1623 First Folio was its editor and contributor of its two verses Ben Jonson who at the time the Folio was making its way through the Jaggard printing presses was living with Bacon at Gorhambury, where he was at the heart of the secret plans for bringing together this vast and complex enterprise.

The Droeshout engraving on the title page of the most famous secular work in English history is iconic and recognised the world over as the contemporary face of William Shakespeare the greatest poet and dramatist of all time. In strikingly marked contrast virtually nothing is known about Martin Droeshout the draughtsman responsible for the most recognisable literary image since time immemorial. A remarkable level of secrecy still surrounds his private life, friends and the social and professional circles he moved in, even though he self-evidently knew some of the most important figures in Jacobean England and moved in the highest circles of his times. This man who for the first thirty-three years of his life lived in the heart of London has scarcely left any documentary trace of his existence akin to him having been deliberately expunged from the records. To the present day his whole life is completely shrouded in secrecy and mystery. The silence is deafening. What could be the reason for all this secrecy and silence? The key reason is the Droeshout engraving on the title page of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is a mask behind which its concealed author Francis Bacon is hidden in plain sight, which when lifted reveals the truth behind the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion and ludibrium that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere of Stratford was the author of the greatest literature in the history of the world. This illusion revealed, with one devastating stroke brings the whole Stratfordian fiction crashing to the ground.

For the first time, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion conveys an explosive secret in making known the concealed and hidden relationship between Francis Bacon and Martin Droeshout which has been suppressed for the last four hundred years. Their secret relationship is encapsulated in an earlier Droeshout engraving titled Doctor Panurgus (c. 1621) wherein one of its central figures is a depiction of Francis Bacon replete with a series of clues and indicators to confirm it.

The figure of Bacon in the Dr Panurgus engraving by Droeshout dating from the early 1620s is drawn from life, which points to Bacon sitting for it at Gorhambury. The complex engraving has clearly been carefully planned and must have involved Bacon giving Droeshout instructions and further directions that over a period of time necessitated numerous revision and amendments, not unlike the Droeshout in the First Folio, which exists in three known states, showing close attention to minor details as well as slight changes made to various aspects of it. This process was taking place around the time Bacon was planning and preparing his Shakespeare plays for the Jaggard printing house during the years 1621 to 1623 when it is likely that Droeshout made numerous visits to see Bacon at his country estate at Gorhambury where he was most likely residing for periods with Bacon and Ben Jonson as part of his entourage of good pens and other artists that made up his literary workshop.

The work also lift the veil of secrecy surrounding the hitherto unknown relationships between Francis Bacon and the other little-known figures Hugh Holland, James Mabbe and Leonard Digges who contributed verses to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Particularly, Bacon’s relationship with Leonard Digges, whose father Sir Nicholas Bacon was the special patron of his grandfather and father Leonard Digges and Thomas Digges, the poet whose verse prefixed to the First Folio refers to the Stratford Monument, which is adorned with Rosicrucian-Freemasonic symbols and Baconian ciphers, secretly commissioned by Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

It is little known that the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio contains a series of special Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic AA and Archer headpieces cryptically incorporating the monogram of Francis Bacon and in the case of the latter spelling out his name F. Bacon. Across the address by Ben Jonson in the First Folio ‘To the memory of my beloued, The AVTHOR Mr. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: AND what he hath left vs’, written during the period he was living with Bacon at Gorhambury, appears the Freemasonic Seven Set Squares headpiece, indicating to other members of the Brotherhood that Bacon was the concealed author behind the pseudonym Shakespeare and the secret Grand Master of all Freemasons who rules by the Square, with ‘what he has left vs’, alluding to the secret Freemasonic system left to the world for the future benefit of humankind. Beyond the fact that the Freemasonic Seven Set Squares appears over the Ben Jonson address in the Folio, the same headpiece appears numerous times throughout the volume over the following Shakespeare plays: The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, King John, I Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Richard III, Henry VIII, Romeo and Juliet, Timon of Athens and Hamlet.

In addition to all the above cryptic devices secretly inserted by Bacon in the Shakespeare First Folio there are also many remarkable and astonishing references and allusions to himself and members of the Bacon family, which for four hundred years have remained unfamiliar or unknown to the ordinary schoolmen, the casual student, and effectively the rest of the world. These include references and allusions to himself in several different plays where the character is in some instances named Francis and similarly where characters are named after his three brothers Sir Nicholas Bacon, Sir Nathaniel Bacon, and Anthony Bacon. Similarly in the First Folio there are references and allusions to his father and mother Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Cooke Bacon, her sisters Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell and her husband John, Lord Russell, Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil and her husband William Cecil, Lord Burghley, as well as their offspring (Bacon’s cousins) Thomas Posthumous Hoby and Sir Robert Cecil, and the son of their brother William Cooke, named after his father, Bacon’s other cousin, known as William Cooke of Highnam Court in Gloucester.

In recent times a very substantial body of academic literature has been produced by orthodox critics and commentators surrounding the subject of Shakespeare and anagrams. Individually and collectively these writings illustrate and determine that not only was Shakespeare, the greatest poet of his age, but he was its greatest anagrammatist. In the First Folio Bacon secretly inserts numerous acrostics and anagrams confirming his authorship among them: I AM FRA[NCIS] BACON, FRANCIS BACON, FRAN [CIS] BACON, F BACON, BY ONE BACON, BY BACON, and BACON.

The Shakespeare First Folio embodies the philosophy and teachings of Freemasonry and contains overt and covert references and allusions to its secret practices, protocols, and customs. It is intimately familiar with knowledge of its degrees of initiations, and the constitution, rules, and regular workings of the Lodge. It is also familiar with the language and terminology of the Freemasonry Brotherhood, its secret signs, handshakes, and other forms of greetings and identification. It is most importantly saturated with the grand philosophical scheme of Bacon to regenerate the world and unite humankind into a truly global society based upon peace and love, the declared aim of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, to bring about over time the Universal Reformation of the Whole World.

Review of N. B. Cockburn, The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory Made Sane (1998): A Classic Worth Reprinting

by Christina G. Waldman


1998 does not seem so long ago to me. That was when N. B.Cockburn, late British barrister, devoted 740 pages to setting forth his evidence in favor of Francis Bacon’s authorship of the works traditionally attributed to “William Shakespeare,” based largely on that name/pseudonym’s being printed on the title page of the 1623 First Folio. Barry R. Clarke (Francis Bacon’s Contribution to Shakespeare (New York: Routledge, 2019)), Brian McClinton (The Shakespeare Conspiracies, (Aubane: Aubane Historical Society, 2006 and Belfast: Shanway Press, 2008)), and other authors, including myself, have acknowledged their debt to Cockburn. Mather Walker has previously reviewed the book for SirBacon.org which prints in full its table of contents.

Read more: Download PDF

Brian McClinton critiques writers with a bias against Bacon

Thanks to Christina Waldman for pointing out Brian McClinton critiques writers with a bias against Bacon
Saving Bacon 4


Brian McClinton’s letter, Sept. 27, 2005, in Prospect Magazine, Nov. 20, 2005.

https://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/magazine/7095-letters.

27th September 2005

In his travesty of the character and ideas of Francis Bacon, Terence Kealey describes him as an “unusually unpleasant” man “who collected… many bribes.” On the contrary, JG Crowther demonstrates (Francis Bacon: The First Statesman of Science, 1960) that Bacon was “fundamentally incorruptible.” Indeed he was almost alone among leading politicians in not paying James I for his offices and promotions. Nieves Mathews in Francis Bacon: The History of a Character Assassination (1996), argues that he was completely innocent of the charges of bribery and that writers such as Macaulay were themselves guilty of slandering Bacon’s reputation and unfairly influencing later generations.

The best judges of Bacon’s character are those nearest to him. To his apothecary Peter Boener he was “a noteworthy example… of all virtue, gentleness, peacefulness, and patience.” To his editor Rawley, “if [ever] there were a beam of knowledge derived from God upon any man in these modern times, it was upon him.” Aubrey tells us that “all that were great and good loved and honoured him.”

As for his ideas, Kealey completely misrepresents his whole philosophy. Bacon’s lodestar was not power, as he suggests, but truth. He spells it out himself in his beautiful Proem: “For myself, I found that I was fitted for nothing so well as for the study of Truth; as having a mind nimble and versatile enough to catch the resemblances of things (which is the chief point), and at the same time steady enough to fix and distinguish their subtler differences; as being gifted by nature with desire to seek, patience to doubt, fondness to meditate, slowness to assert, readiness to reconsider, carefulness to dispose and set in order; and as being a man that neither affects what is new nor admires what is old, and that hates every kind of imposture. So I thought my nature had a kind of familiarity and relationship with Truth.”

In other words, Bacon’s “method” is as provisional as that of Popper, who completely misrepresents him. If modern science is based upon the presumption of error and fallibility, then Bacon remains its true trumpeter. Nor did he rely only on induction, as Kealey implies, for he insisted on a continual interchange between theory and experiment. When he wrote that “knowledge itself is power” he meant not worldly success or useful technology but the proof of scientific theories: “Human knowledge and human power meet in one; for where the cause is not known, the effect cannot be produced. Nature to be commanded must be obeyed; and that which in contemplation is as the cause is in operation as the rule” (Novum Organum). In short, only by making nature act in a certain way—exercising power—can we be sure that we understand how it does act, and only by knowing that can we control it. Bacon realised that science could be useful for the good of mankind but he also believed in knowledge and work for their own sake as “pledges of truth.”

Finally, Kealey goes off the rails altogether in his paean to private funding of science. It was the co-operative and collaborative nature of scientific discovery that concerned Bacon, not the issue of the state’s role.

Frankly, it is a puzzle why so many writers in England persistently misrepresent one of the world’s greatest geniuses. Most of them would improve their scholarship if they read Bacon himself instead of parroting his unreliable commentators.

Brian McClinton, Author of
The Shakespeare Conspiracies : Untangling a 400 year Web of Myth & Deceit.

Lisburn, Northern Ireland
Academic journals

26th September 2005 Letters.

The Play That Solves the Shakespeare Authorship Mystery

A book by Don Elfenbein


 

One reader of www.sirbacon.org, Don Elfenbein of Morgantown, West Virginia, has recently self-published, through Lulu Press, a short print-on-demand book entitled The Play That Solves the Shakespeare Authorship Mystery: The Allegory of Francis Bacon’s Natural Philosophy in The Tempest.

Click here to read the PDF version.

This essay gathers together and documents a number of incontrovertible but little-noticed facts that speak Shakespeare’s true name loudly and clearly.

Written for general readers and scholars alike, the essay systematizes and extends the investigations of the pioneering researchers who first published, more than a century ago, the provocative contention that The Tempest allegorizes a body of Baconian thought. It demonstrates that fourteen elements of this play having to do with the magus Prospero, the spirit Ariel, and the witch Sycorax resemble and represent fourteen of Bacon’s natural-philosophical ideas, several of which are peculiar to him. Those ideas include not only the general methodological prescriptions for which Bacon is famous but also his unique and largely forgotten conjectures about the inner workings of nature.

These numerous and striking parallels between elements of the play and elements of Bacon’s philosophy, the author argues, together constitute persuasive proof that Bacon wrote this celebrated drama.

Don is a researcher and former law professor who has been interested in the Baconian theory since the 1970s. He is eager to discuss his study with anyone who is interested in examining it and perhaps offering him comments, corrections, or suggestions.

A printed copy of the essay can be ordered from the Lulu Press bookstore:The Play That Solves the Shakespeare Authorship Mystery

The Play That Solves the Shakespeare Authorship Mystery

Don’s email address is don.elfenbein@gmail.com.

UPDATE: June 1, 2023:

PDF – THE PLAY THAT SOLVES THE SHAKESPEARE AUTHORSHIP MYSTERY

FBS: Shakespeare, aka Sir Francis Bacon – Sir Mark Rylance and Gary Cordice

Video by the Francis Bacon Society


Shakespeare, aka Sir Francis Bacon – Sir Mark Rylance and Gary Cordice celebrate his legacyShakespeare, aka Sir Francis Bacon – Sir Mark Rylance and Gary Cordice celebrate 463 years of his legacy within world culture at his birthday bash in 2023 at the Royal Airforce Club, London  The Francis Bacon Society provides a platform for discussion of subjects connected with the Objects of the Society, but the Council does not necessarily endorse the opinions expressed by contributors or correspondents.  We welcome members of the public to pitch suitable videos they have made or will make which can be uploaded to the Francis Bacon website and/or YouTube Channel. Please contact us at francis.bacon.society@gmail.com 

 

Did Francis Bacon really die on April 9, 1626?

by A. Phoenix


SirBacon.org is excited to share the following work by A. Phoenix on Easter Sunday April 9, 2023 on the anniversary of Bacon’s “passing” on Easter Sunday April 9, 1626.

Did Francis Bacon die in 1626 or Feign his Death with the help of his Rosicrucian Brotherhood?

https://sirbacon.org/FRANCIS%20BACONS%20DEATH.pdf

Join the discussion on the B’ Hive Community Forum!

Baconamania at Greenwich – April 14, 2023


The Francis Bacon Society established in 1886 will be celebrating it’s 137th anniversary on April 14th. If you would like to attend this special event see the information below. If you want to know more about the Francis Bacon Society visit https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/


Friday 14th April Diana and Gary Invite you and your guests to: 

BACONAMANIA AT GREENWICH

In the dawning of this new age,
Baconamania is all the rage,
Come and meet not just this sage,
Other Knights who went from light to shade.

It is the birthday of prophet Bacon,
Time to rattle chains and to take on
This tour of paintings to you inspire
In the company of certain Knights of the sacred empire.

Come and hear brave stories to incite ire,
Hear what led their fortune to expire,
Then to the tavern we will retire,
Over a cold brew and a cosy fire.

FRIDAY 14TH APRIL, 2023

3PM

MEET AT THE QUEEN’S HOUSE GREENWICH ROYAL PARK UNDER THE RIGHT COLONNADE (LOOKING FROM THE MAIN ENTRANCE)

PLEASE BOOK TICKETS ONLINE VIA THE ROYAL MARINES WEBSITE; https://www.rmg.co.uk/queens-house , ADMISSION FREE, BOOKING NECESSARY

SHOULD YOU WISH TO GO FOR A DRINK AFTER WE WILL HEAD TO SPLENDID AND RENOWNED TRAFALGAR TAVERN (great fish and chips) ON THE RIVERBANK BELOW THE PARK

TRANSPORT BY THAMES CLIPPER TO GREENWICH PIER

OR

DLR GREENWICH STATION CUTTY SARK

RSVP dianasheppard123@btinternet.com 

No later than Tuesday 11th April

 

Best Shakespeare-Bacon Parallels Pt. 3: 41/885 Examples

Video presented by guitaoist


Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Pt. 3: 41/885 Examples

Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Paperback – August 24, 2016
by Edwin 1835-1908 Reed (Author)

The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon, Chapter II

The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon by Alfred Dodd

From :  Alfred Dodd’s Book

The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon

pp. 30-35
Chapter II

His Birth, Life and Labours, 1561-1621

(special thanks to Gerald Francis Bacon)

Pallas Athena was the Goddess of Wisdom and was supposed to preside over the whole of the intellectual and moral side of human life. She was the patroness of the useful and elegant arts such as weaving (felling), imparting to her devotees the peuculiar Masonic Virtues of Prudence, Courage, Preserverance. She protected the State from outward enemies. The Britannia on our English coins is taken from Pallas. She was credited with being the inventor of musical instruments. The Olive wreath denoting Peace was her emblem. She was a Creator and Preserver.

She was depicted in Greek Art with a Helmet on her head. She held the Spear of Knowledge in her right hand, poised to strike at the Serpent of Ignorance writhing under her foot. The large Helmet denoted that she waged invisibly a silent war against Sloth and Ignorance. She was usually placed on the Greek Temples with a Golden Spear in her hand. When the morning rays of the sun glinted on the weapon, causing it apparently to tremble, the common people were in the habit of saying smilingly : “Athena is Shaking her Spear again.” She was thus known as “the Spear Shaker” or ” the “Shaker of the Spear.”….

Read more…>

Bacon and Shakespeare on Love by Edwin Reed

By SirBacon.org

Bacon and Shakespeare on Love by Edwin Reed

Pages 5-30

In a lecture on Francis Bacon’s essays, recently delivered in our American Cambridge by an instructor of Harvard university, the audience, when the essay of Love had been read, was convulsed with laughter by the quizzical injunction addressed to it. “Fancy Bacon writing ‘Romeo and Juliet!'” Lord Tennyson, had he been present, would undoubtedly have been in full sympathy with the spirit of the occasion, for he also, referring to the same essay, once asked, ” Could Bacon, holding such sentiments, have written ‘Romeo and Juliet?’ ” Tennyson’s own answer to the question was this : “any man who believes that he could have done so is a fool.” Indeed, the opinion among cultivated people on both sides of the Atlantic, that the greatest with one possible exception the world has produced, and according to Macaulay, the “possessor of the most exquisitely constructed intellect ever bestowed on any children of men” was incapacitated by a constitutional defect in his character to write the garden scene in the famous play is so general that we are brought face to face with a new problem, not in authorship alone, but in psychology itself. The question is not one of intellectual power, of style of writing, of differences in poetry and prose as expressions of thought, but of the heart, of pure feeling. Read more…>

Also, for a Happy Valentine’s day…

LOVE AND BUSINESS by Robert Theobald

from the book Shakespeare Studies in Baconian Light

Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Paperback – August 24, 2016
by Edwin 1835-1908 Reed (Author)

“I have just had a letter from a man who wants my opinion as to whether Shakespeare’s Plays were written by Bacon. I feel inclined to write back, “Don’t be a fool, sir!’ The way in which Bacon speaks of love would be enough to prove that he was not Shakespeare. ” I know not how, but martial men are given to love. I think it is but as they are given to wine, for perils commonly asked to be paid in pleasures.’ How could a man with such an idea of love write Romeo and Juliet?

And yet even Tennyson might have paused before shutting off the claims for Bacon with such resolute incredulity, not to say unexpressed incivility. For he himself had found in Bacon qualities which are at first sight as incompatible with an unromantic view of love, as he supposed Shakespeare to be. Tennyson had been on one occasion speaking of Lord Bacon, and said,

“That certain passages of his writings, their frequent eloquence and vivid completeness lifted him more than those of almost any other writer.”

And of the Essays he said,

“There is more wisdom compressed into that small volume than in any other book of the same size that I know.” (Life, II. 76, 415).

Clearly, then, any unfavourable impression derived from one or tow passages in a small Essay may be corrected and perhaps even vindicated when a larger view is taken. What more could he say of Shakespeare’s wisdom than this?

The objection which Tennyson expressed so energetically is one that is often raised when the Baconian theory is under discussion.

Read more…>

 

Francis Bacon’s Private Notebook with Hundreds of Parallels in his Shakespeare Works – The Promus

by A. Phoenix


SirBacon.org is excited to share the following work by A. Phoenix on the 462nd Birthday of Sir Francis Bacon, January 22, 2023.

Francis Bacon’s Private Manuscript Notebook (Known as the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies) The Source of Several Hundred Resemblances, Correspondences and Parallels Found Throughout his Shakespeare Poems and Plays

By A. Phoenix
January 2023

In ordinary circumstances this contemporary manuscript document named the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies would be well known to every Bacon and Shakespeare scholar and student of English literature around the world.

Bacon’s unique private notebook held at the British Library contains a total of 51 leaves numbered pages 83 to 132 all written (apart from some French proverbs) in his own hand. The Folio numbered 85 is headed ‘Promus’ and beneath it appears the date ‘Dec. 5, 1594’ with the Folio numbered 114 headed ‘Formularies Promus’ carrying the date ‘27 Jan. 1595’ (i.e., January 1596).

It contains 1655 entries jotted down as an aid to his memory.

The entries include single words, phrases, lines, turns of speech, metaphors, similes, aphorisms, and various moral and philosophical observations. These include entries drawn from the Bible; Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, and English proverbs; and lines and verses from classical poets and dramatists, among them, Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence.

This private notebook was used by Bacon as a literary storehouse from where he developed, expanded, and introduced ideas and themes into his acknowledged writings and works. 

In Shakespeare Studies in Baconian Light R. M. Theobald produced a list of around 500 Promus entries used by Bacon in his acknowledged writings, a number the orthodox scholar Charles Crawford stated could be significantly added to, and following his detailed study of the Promus in The Bacon Shakespeare Question N. B. Cockburn put the number at about 600. More recently, its modern editors Professor Stewart and Dr Knight in The Oxford Francis BaconEarly Writings 1584-1596 (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2012) specified that during a period of thirty years Bacon utilised these entries in the Promus for usage in a diverse range of categories and genres that included his private letters, speeches, dramatic devices, essays, religio-political tracts, legal writings, and several of his philosophical and scientific works.

In 1883 the indefatigable Baconian scholar Constance M. Pott published her monumental work entitled The Promus of Formularies and Elegancies (Being Private Notescirc1594hitherto unpublishedby Francis Bacon Illustrated and Elucidated by Passages from Shakespeare.

In a work running to more than six hundred pages, Pott reproduced a full transcript of the entries in the Promus alongside hundreds of parallel passages from the Shakespeare poems and plays. This work has remained virtually unknown for the last one hundred and fifty years because it has been systematically ignored and misrepresented by orthodox Bacon and Shakespeare editors and commentators as it manifestly demonstrates that Bacon is Shakespeare.   

Now here for the first time (unknown to or expanded upon by Pott and other previous scholars and commentators) beyond paralleling hundreds of entries from Bacon’s notebook against his Shakespeare poems and plays, the present work will show how these sources used by Bacon, the Bible, Erasmus, Florio (Italian proverbs), Heywood (English proverbs), and especially the classical poets and dramatists Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence, completely saturate his Shakespeare works, confirming beyond any doubt that he used his private notebook as an aid-to-memory and wellspring for his divine Shakespeare poems and plays.

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER:

 JOIN THE DISCUSSION ON THE B’HIVE BACONIAN FORUM:
https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/index.php?/topic/367-francis-bacons-private-notebook-the-promus-source-for-hundreds-of-parallels-in-his-shakespeare-works 


Note from SirBacon.org – For further enjoyment visit https://sirbacon.org/baconspeakspromus.htm


Secret Bacon Signatures, Acrostics & Anagrams in Shakespeare

by A. Phoenix


A Very Happy 2023 to Everyone at SirBacon.org, B’Hive, and all Baconians around the World.

A Short 4 Minute Video Dedicated to Rob Fowler & Yann Le Merlus for all their great work.

Best Shakespeare-Bacon Parallels: 45/885 Examples

Video presented by guitaoist


Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms: 45/885 Examples

Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Paperback – August 24, 2016
by Edwin 1835-1908 Reed (Author)

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript Part 2

by A. Phoenix


THE BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (HITHERTO KNOWN AS
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT) WHICH ORIGINALLY
CONTAINED COPIES OF HIS SHAKESPEARE PLAYS
RICHARD II AND RICHARD III.
By A Phoenix
November 2022

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research


The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript Part 2 Video

In 1867 an astounding Elizabethan document (c. 1596) was discovered at Northumberland House in London. It should have had the most extraordinary impact on the literary world as it reveals the true author of the Shakespeare works. Instead it was misleadingly named The Northumberland Manuscript and quietly either ignored or misrepresented for over 150 years.

Why?

The manuscript belonging to Francis Bacon contains copies of his early writings and originally his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

The contents page reveals explosive information. The names of both Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare are scribbled repeatedly all over its outer cover.

This is the only contemporary Elizabethan document in the world that features both the names of Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare. Why then is it not the most famous document in the world? Because the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript contains a world changing truth. . .

Francis Bacon is Shakespeare.

For the full story about ‘The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

Part 1 VIDEO: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM

 

The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript

by A. Phoenix


THE BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (HITHERTO KNOWN AS
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT) WHICH ORIGINALLY
CONTAINED COPIES OF HIS SHAKESPEARE PLAYS
RICHARD II AND RICHARD III.
By A Phoenix
November 2022

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research


For the full story about ‘The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM

CONTENTS

1. The Silence of the Shakespeare Scholars p. 6
2. The Discovery of the so-called Northumberland Manuscript p. 12
3. The Outer Cover of Bacon’s Northumberland Manuscript p. 16
4. The Handwriting on the Outer Cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 38
5. The date of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 49
6. The Letters, Religio-Political Tracts and Dramatic Devices still Present in the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript and their links to his other Shakespeare poems and plays p. 51
7. The Anonymous Leicester’s Commonwealth the Most Scandalous and Explosive Political Tract of the Elizabethan Era p. 96
8. The Missing Pieces of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript: Letters, Speeches, Essays, Dramatic Devices and Plays p. 150
9. The Shakespeare Plays Richard II and Richard III originally contained within the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 167
10. References p. 200

FACSIMILES

1. The Outer Cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS known as the Northumberland Manuscript p. 18
2. A Modern Rendering of the Outer Cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS
known as the Northumberland Manuscript p. 19
3. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first stanza of The Rape of Lucrece (1594) p. 21
4. The last page of The Rape of Lucrece containing the secret signature F. Bacon p. 22
5. The title page of Ars Adulandi, The Art of Flattery containing the verse scribbled over the outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 25
6. Page 136 of Love’s Labour’s Lost in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio p. 27
7. The title page of the 1598 quarto edition of Love’s Labour’s Lost ‘By W. Shakespere’ incorporating the concealed acrostic BACON p. 29
8. The title page of the 1600 quarto edition of The Merchant of Venice p. 31
9. The title page of the anonymous 1597 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet p. 34
10. The title page of the 1599 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet with its concealed anagram BACON p. 35
11. First page of the 1599 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet with its Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece p. 36
12. The poem by John Davies ‘To our English Terence Mr. Will: Shake-speare’
revealing Bacon is Shakespeare p. 42
13. A facsimile copy of a letter from Francis Bacon to Michael Hicks p. 46
14. An enlarged part of the outside cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare MSS p. 47
15. The Tudor family Hilliard miniatures of Queen Elizabeth, Robert Dudley, and their concealed royal sons, Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux p. 53
16. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece over the dedication page of the first Shakespeare poem Venus and Adonis (1593) p. 54
17. The White Hart Inn at the edge of the Bacon family estate at Gorhambury
with its Mural depicting the Boar and death of Adonis in Venus and Adonis and Bacon’s Boar Crest from the special copy of his Novum Organum p. 57
18. Francis Bacon’s Achievement of Arms headed with the Crest of a Boar p. 58
19. The title page of the 1591 edition of The Troublesome Raigne of Iohn King of England, with the discouerie of King Richard Cordelions Base sonne (vulgarly named, The Bastard Fawconbridge) p. 60
20. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth royal mother of Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex p. 74
21. Portrait of Francis Bacon concealed Prince of Wales heir to the throne p. 75
22. Portrait of Robert Devereux a Royal Tudor Prince p. 76
23. The title page of Bacon’s Sagesse Mysterieuse Des Anciens depicting  allas Athena the Shaker of the Spear from where he derived his nom de plume
Shake-speare with the two mottoes ‘Truth is enveloped by obscurity’ and ‘Thus it shines in the shadows’ p. 78
24. The emblem on the title page of New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians) with the inscription ‘In Time the Hidden Truth Will be Revealed’) p. 79
25. The Pregnancy Portrait of Queen Elizabeth p. 87
26. Portrait of her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester p. 88
27. Portrait of Francis Bacon as a child p. 89
28. The title page of the 1584 edition of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 97
29. The title page of the 1641 edition of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 106
30. The title page of the 1641 edition of Leicester’s Commonwealth attributed to Robert Parson p. 107
31. The title page of the 1706 edition Secret Memoirs of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (Leicester’s Commonwealth) p. 110
32. The title page of the 1904 edition of the History of Queen Elizabeth, Amy Robsart and the Earl of Leicester (Leicester’s Commonwealth) p. 111
33. Deciphered title page of the 1584 edition of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 140
34. The deciphered ‘The Preface of the Conference’ page from Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 141
35. The deciphered emblem prefaced to the 1585 French version of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 144
36. The English version/translation of the ‘Addition of the Translator’ appended to the 1585 French version of Leicester’s Commonwealth (Exeter College,
Oxford MS 166) p. 145
37. The title page of the 1597 edition of Bacon’s Essays p. 153
38. The title page of the 1598 edition of Bacon’s Essays p. 154
39. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece on the anonymous Epicedivm, A Funerall Song, vpon the vertuous life, and godly death, of the right worshipfull the Lady Helen Branch (1594) p. 158
40. The first page of Epicedivm containing reference to The Rape of Lucrece and Asmund and Cornelia replete with a 33 Bacon cipher p. 159
41. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first sonnet in the 1609 edition of Shakespeares Sonnets p. 160
42. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first verse of A Lover’s Complaint with an acrostic spelling out the name of its author Bacon p. 161
43. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the dedication page of Nashes Lenten Stuffe (1599) p. 163
44. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece on the title page of Pierce Pennilesse his supplication to the Diuell (1595) p. 164
45. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1597 edition of Richard III p. 168
46. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the p. 169 1598 edition of Richard III
47. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1597 edition of Richard II p. 170
48. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1598 edition of Richard II p. 171
49. The deciphered title page of the 1597 edition of Richard II p. 195
50. The deciphered title page of the 1597 edition of Richard III p. 196
51. The anagram BACON on the title page of the 1598 edition of Richard III p. 197
52. The deciphered title page of the 1599 edition of The First Part of the Life and Raigne of King Henry IIII p. 198

 


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Shaker of the Spear – in The Magic Garden | Ross Jackson

by R. Jackson


Ross Jackson Author of Shaker of the Speare gives a Video presentation:

46 Great and Rare Quotes about Francis Bacon and the Shakespeare Works

by A. Phoenix


It is little known that there are a substantial number of passages by professors and academics relating to the links and connections between Bacon and Shakespeare. These links appear in largely inaccessible or out of the way learned journals or other difficult to obtain publications that the majority of scholars, students and casual readers are unfamiliar with. I have therefore thought on the basis that they may be of interest to a wider audience to gather them together in one place for those with an interest in Francis Bacon and Shakespeare and the authorship of the Shakespeare works.

Two Formats : One is in text form and the other is the video.

Short paper available here:   https://www.academia.edu/90586683/Great_and_Rare_Quotes_About_Francis_Bacon_and_The_Shakespeare_Works

Great & Rare Quotes About Francis Bacon & The Shakespeare Works

The full text PDF is posted below the YouTube video.

Video here:

 

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33 Quotes by Sir Francis Bacon on Poetry, Drama & Theatre

by A. Phoenix


There is a generally held belief that Francis Bacon the serious legal, philosophical and scientific mind had no time for or interest in poetry, drama and the theatre. Nothing could be further from the truth. His works of law, science, philosophy, literature, essays, personal letters and even legal charges are permeated throughout with theatrical metaphors and allusions revealing his extensive and profound interest in poetry, drama and the theatre.

39 Great & Rare Quotes about Sir Francis Bacon

by A. Phoenix


Here’s the next short quote video about the Great One dedicated to Lawrence in celebration of 25 wonderful years of sirbacon.org♥️♥️