Skip to content

Christina Waldman

Christina G. Waldman’s Essays, Reviews, & Commentary on All Things Bacon & Shakespeare For SirBacon.org


Visit: ChristinaGWaldman.com

A Dedicated Sleuth Finds Picture-Puzzles Long Buried: A Review of Russell Storrs Hall, Bacon Shakespeare Conundrum: Direct Evidence of Francis Bacon’s Shakespeare Authorship (posthumously published, 2012)

By Christina G. Waldman. 9-29-2021


“Bacon Shakespeare Conundrum was published posthumously by the author’s daughter, Janice Gold-Orland. Researching for this book was her father’s lifetime passion, she says. It is obvious from his book that Hall has studied the Bacon-Shakespeare authorship question in some depth. One of his main points is that “The only way out of the authorship enigma is to be found in the Shakespeare Folio of 1623″ (p. 12). There is a great deal of other evidence, of course, but that is the course he sets for himself in this book.” Read more:

Review Russell Storrs Hall by CGW 9-29-2021.pdf

Francis Bacon, Shakespeare, and Tortured Secrets: Violence, Violins, and–One Day–Vindication?

(updated version) by Christina G. Waldman


Francis Bacon, Shakespeare, and Tortured Secrets: Violence, Violins, and–One Day–Vindication? by Christina G. Waldman
https://sirbacon.org/waldman/Waldman Violence Violins Vindication final 5-21-21.pdf

Review of “Law Sports at Gray’s Inn” by Basil Brown

by Christina G. Waldman


Christina Waldman offers a Brief Review of “Law Sports at Gray’s Inn” by Basil Brown

Basil Brown review for SirBacon 9-17-20.pdf

Bacon’s Maiden Speech to Parliament & His Royal Birth

by Christina Waldman


In his 1958 article, “Francis Bacon and His Father,” Paul H. Kocher describes an incident that took place during Francis Bacon’s maiden speech to Parliament. This was in November, 1584, when Bacon was twenty-three years old. He had just been elected a member of the House of Commons for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis…

Bacon’s Maiden Speech to Parliament & His Royal Birth by Christina Waldman

Christina Waldman reviews Peter Dawkins new book “Second Seeing Shakespeare”

by Christina G. Waldman


In his new book, Second-Seeing Shakespeare: “Stay Passenger, why goest thou by so fast?”, Peter Dawkins, respected teacher, author, and founder-principal of the Francis Bacon Research Trust, explains how the art adorning the Shakespeare Monument in Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon (ca. 1616-1623) corresponds beautifully with the enigmatic language and Shakespeare “portrait” (Droeshout engraving) in the front matter to the First Folio of 1623, the first comprehensive publication of Shakespeare’s plays.

Review of Second-Seeing Shakespeare: “Stay Passenger, why goest thou by so fast?” by Peter Dawkins

Francis Bacon’s Hidden Hand in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice: A Study in Law, Rhetoric and Authorship


Christina Waldman’s book, Francis Bacon’s Hidden Hand in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice: A Study in Law, Rhetoric and Authorship is being published in July 2018 by Algora Publishing with a foreword by Simon Miles. The book explores the function and identity of Bellario, the old Italian jurist whose hand guides Portia’s courtroom performance, although he never actually “appears” in the play. Is Bellario’s identity linked to Francis Bacon, as Mark Edwin Andrews proposed in Law v. Equity in The Merchant of Venice: a Legalization of Act IV, Scene I (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 1965)?

Appendix IV of the book includes Maureen Ward-Gandy’s 1992 forensic handwriting comparison of the handwriting in a fragment of manuscript, found in binder’s waste, which is clearly a scene variation of The Play of Henry IV, Part One, with the handwriting of Francis Bacon and other contemporaries. In her report, Ms. Ward-Gandy concluded that the handwriting in that drafted scene matched that of Francis Bacon.

Hidden Hand is available from the publisher, https://www.algora.com/545/book/details.html, Amazon, and other sources.

Ms. Waldman would also like to draw your attention to Mather Walker’s essay, “The Symbolic AA, Secrets of the Shakespeare First Folio.” Under the heading “The Secret of Old Eleusis: Plucking Out the Heart of His Mystery,” and under the picture from the Rosicrucian Digest 2000 (about 7/8 down on the scroll bar), there is an acrostic in the opening lines of the poem, “The Rape of Lucrece,” written in 1594. The first letters spell FBLAWAO, with the word “law” spelled in the middle. She had not seen this most likely explanation of the name “Bellario” until the book was already published, but has no doubt that the timing is exactly as it should be.

Bacon is Bellario with “Just Deserts for All”


Christina G. Waldman has contributed a new essay, Bacon is Bellario with “Just Deserts for All”:
An explanation of Mark Edwin Andrews’ Second Argument in “Law v Equity” in “The Merchant of Venice’s Legalization of Act IV, Scene I

A Dedicated Sleuth Finds Picture-Puzzles Long Buried: A Review of Russell Storrs Hall, Bacon Shakespeare Conundrum: Direct Evidence of Francis Bacon’s Shakespeare Authorship (posthumously published, 2012)

By Christina G. Waldman. 9-29-2021


“Bacon Shakespeare Conundrum was published posthumously by the author’s daughter, Janice Gold-Orland. Researching for this book was her father’s lifetime passion, she says. It is obvious from his book that Hall has studied the Bacon-Shakespeare authorship question in some depth. One of his main points is that “The only way out of the authorship enigma is to be found in the Shakespeare Folio of 1623″ (p. 12). There is a great deal of other evidence, of course, but that is the course he sets for himself in this book.” Read more:

Review Russell Storrs Hall by CGW 9-29-2021.pdf

Francis Bacon, Shakespeare, and Tortured Secrets: Violence, Violins, and–One Day–Vindication?

(updated version) by Christina G. Waldman


Francis Bacon, Shakespeare, and Tortured Secrets: Violence, Violins, and–One Day–Vindication? by Christina G. Waldman
https://sirbacon.org/waldman/Waldman Violence Violins Vindication final 5-21-21.pdf

Review of “Law Sports at Gray’s Inn” by Basil Brown

by Christina G. Waldman


Christina Waldman offers a Brief Review of “Law Sports at Gray’s Inn” by Basil Brown

Basil Brown review for SirBacon 9-17-20.pdf

Bacon’s Maiden Speech to Parliament & His Royal Birth

by Christina Waldman


In his 1958 article, “Francis Bacon and His Father,” Paul H. Kocher describes an incident that took place during Francis Bacon’s maiden speech to Parliament. This was in November, 1584, when Bacon was twenty-three years old. He had just been elected a member of the House of Commons for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis…

Bacon’s Maiden Speech to Parliament & His Royal Birth by Christina Waldman

Christina Waldman reviews Peter Dawkins new book “Second Seeing Shakespeare”

by Christina G. Waldman


In his new book, Second-Seeing Shakespeare: “Stay Passenger, why goest thou by so fast?”, Peter Dawkins, respected teacher, author, and founder-principal of the Francis Bacon Research Trust, explains how the art adorning the Shakespeare Monument in Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon (ca. 1616-1623) corresponds beautifully with the enigmatic language and Shakespeare “portrait” (Droeshout engraving) in the front matter to the First Folio of 1623, the first comprehensive publication of Shakespeare’s plays.

Review of Second-Seeing Shakespeare: “Stay Passenger, why goest thou by so fast?” by Peter Dawkins

Francis Bacon’s Hidden Hand in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice: A Study in Law, Rhetoric and Authorship


Christina Waldman’s book, Francis Bacon’s Hidden Hand in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice: A Study in Law, Rhetoric and Authorship is being published in July 2018 by Algora Publishing with a foreword by Simon Miles. The book explores the function and identity of Bellario, the old Italian jurist whose hand guides Portia’s courtroom performance, although he never actually “appears” in the play. Is Bellario’s identity linked to Francis Bacon, as Mark Edwin Andrews proposed in Law v. Equity in The Merchant of Venice: a Legalization of Act IV, Scene I (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 1965)?

Appendix IV of the book includes Maureen Ward-Gandy’s 1992 forensic handwriting comparison of the handwriting in a fragment of manuscript, found in binder’s waste, which is clearly a scene variation of The Play of Henry IV, Part One, with the handwriting of Francis Bacon and other contemporaries. In her report, Ms. Ward-Gandy concluded that the handwriting in that drafted scene matched that of Francis Bacon.

Hidden Hand is available from the publisher, https://www.algora.com/545/book/details.html, Amazon, and other sources.

Ms. Waldman would also like to draw your attention to Mather Walker’s essay, “The Symbolic AA, Secrets of the Shakespeare First Folio.” Under the heading “The Secret of Old Eleusis: Plucking Out the Heart of His Mystery,” and under the picture from the Rosicrucian Digest 2000 (about 7/8 down on the scroll bar), there is an acrostic in the opening lines of the poem, “The Rape of Lucrece,” written in 1594. The first letters spell FBLAWAO, with the word “law” spelled in the middle. She had not seen this most likely explanation of the name “Bellario” until the book was already published, but has no doubt that the timing is exactly as it should be.

Bacon is Bellario with “Just Deserts for All”


Christina G. Waldman has contributed a new essay, Bacon is Bellario with “Just Deserts for All”:
An explanation of Mark Edwin Andrews’ Second Argument in “Law v Equity” in “The Merchant of Venice’s Legalization of Act IV, Scene I