Best Shakespeare-Bacon Parallels Pt. 3: 41/885 Examples

Video presented by guitaoist


Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Pt. 3: 41/885 Examples

Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Paperback – August 24, 2016
by Edwin 1835-1908 Reed (Author)

The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon, Chapter II

The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon by Alfred Dodd

From :  Alfred Dodd’s Book

The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon

pp. 30-35
Chapter II

His Birth, Life and Labours, 1561-1621

(special thanks to Gerald Francis Bacon)

Pallas Athena was the Goddess of Wisdom and was supposed to preside over the whole of the intellectual and moral side of human life. She was the patroness of the useful and elegant arts such as weaving (felling), imparting to her devotees the peuculiar Masonic Virtues of Prudence, Courage, Preserverance. She protected the State from outward enemies. The Britannia on our English coins is taken from Pallas. She was credited with being the inventor of musical instruments. The Olive wreath denoting Peace was her emblem. She was a Creator and Preserver.

She was depicted in Greek Art with a Helmet on her head. She held the Spear of Knowledge in her right hand, poised to strike at the Serpent of Ignorance writhing under her foot. The large Helmet denoted that she waged invisibly a silent war against Sloth and Ignorance. She was usually placed on the Greek Temples with a Golden Spear in her hand. When the morning rays of the sun glinted on the weapon, causing it apparently to tremble, the common people were in the habit of saying smilingly : “Athena is Shaking her Spear again.” She was thus known as “the Spear Shaker” or ” the “Shaker of the Spear.”….

Read more…>

Bacon and Shakespeare on Love by Edwin Reed

By SirBacon.org

Bacon and Shakespeare on Love by Edwin Reed

Pages 5-30

In a lecture on Francis Bacon’s essays, recently delivered in our American Cambridge by an instructor of Harvard university, the audience, when the essay of Love had been read, was convulsed with laughter by the quizzical injunction addressed to it. “Fancy Bacon writing ‘Romeo and Juliet!'” Lord Tennyson, had he been present, would undoubtedly have been in full sympathy with the spirit of the occasion, for he also, referring to the same essay, once asked, ” Could Bacon, holding such sentiments, have written ‘Romeo and Juliet?’ ” Tennyson’s own answer to the question was this : “any man who believes that he could have done so is a fool.” Indeed, the opinion among cultivated people on both sides of the Atlantic, that the greatest with one possible exception the world has produced, and according to Macaulay, the “possessor of the most exquisitely constructed intellect ever bestowed on any children of men” was incapacitated by a constitutional defect in his character to write the garden scene in the famous play is so general that we are brought face to face with a new problem, not in authorship alone, but in psychology itself. The question is not one of intellectual power, of style of writing, of differences in poetry and prose as expressions of thought, but of the heart, of pure feeling. Read more…>

Also, for a Happy Valentine’s day…

LOVE AND BUSINESS by Robert Theobald

from the book Shakespeare Studies in Baconian Light

Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Paperback – August 24, 2016
by Edwin 1835-1908 Reed (Author)

“I have just had a letter from a man who wants my opinion as to whether Shakespeare’s Plays were written by Bacon. I feel inclined to write back, “Don’t be a fool, sir!’ The way in which Bacon speaks of love would be enough to prove that he was not Shakespeare. ” I know not how, but martial men are given to love. I think it is but as they are given to wine, for perils commonly asked to be paid in pleasures.’ How could a man with such an idea of love write Romeo and Juliet?

And yet even Tennyson might have paused before shutting off the claims for Bacon with such resolute incredulity, not to say unexpressed incivility. For he himself had found in Bacon qualities which are at first sight as incompatible with an unromantic view of love, as he supposed Shakespeare to be. Tennyson had been on one occasion speaking of Lord Bacon, and said,

“That certain passages of his writings, their frequent eloquence and vivid completeness lifted him more than those of almost any other writer.”

And of the Essays he said,

“There is more wisdom compressed into that small volume than in any other book of the same size that I know.” (Life, II. 76, 415).

Clearly, then, any unfavourable impression derived from one or tow passages in a small Essay may be corrected and perhaps even vindicated when a larger view is taken. What more could he say of Shakespeare’s wisdom than this?

The objection which Tennyson expressed so energetically is one that is often raised when the Baconian theory is under discussion.

Read more…>

 

Francis Bacon’s Private Notebook with Hundreds of Parallels in his Shakespeare Works – The Promus

by A. Phoenix


SirBacon.org is excited to share the following work by A. Phoenix on the 462nd Birthday of Sir Francis Bacon, January 22, 2023.

Francis Bacon’s Private Manuscript Notebook (Known as the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies) The Source of Several Hundred Resemblances, Correspondences and Parallels Found Throughout his Shakespeare Poems and Plays

By A. Phoenix
January 2023

In ordinary circumstances this contemporary manuscript document named the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies would be well known to every Bacon and Shakespeare scholar and student of English literature around the world.

Bacon’s unique private notebook held at the British Library contains a total of 51 leaves numbered pages 83 to 132 all written (apart from some French proverbs) in his own hand. The Folio numbered 85 is headed ‘Promus’ and beneath it appears the date ‘Dec. 5, 1594’ with the Folio numbered 114 headed ‘Formularies Promus’ carrying the date ‘27 Jan. 1595’ (i.e., January 1596).

It contains 1655 entries jotted down as an aid to his memory.

The entries include single words, phrases, lines, turns of speech, metaphors, similes, aphorisms, and various moral and philosophical observations. These include entries drawn from the Bible; Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, and English proverbs; and lines and verses from classical poets and dramatists, among them, Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence.

This private notebook was used by Bacon as a literary storehouse from where he developed, expanded, and introduced ideas and themes into his acknowledged writings and works. 

In Shakespeare Studies in Baconian Light R. M. Theobald produced a list of around 500 Promus entries used by Bacon in his acknowledged writings, a number the orthodox scholar Charles Crawford stated could be significantly added to, and following his detailed study of the Promus in The Bacon Shakespeare Question N. B. Cockburn put the number at about 600. More recently, its modern editors Professor Stewart and Dr Knight in The Oxford Francis BaconEarly Writings 1584-1596 (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2012) specified that during a period of thirty years Bacon utilised these entries in the Promus for usage in a diverse range of categories and genres that included his private letters, speeches, dramatic devices, essays, religio-political tracts, legal writings, and several of his philosophical and scientific works.

In 1883 the indefatigable Baconian scholar Constance M. Pott published her monumental work entitled The Promus of Formularies and Elegancies (Being Private Notescirc1594hitherto unpublishedby Francis Bacon Illustrated and Elucidated by Passages from Shakespeare.

In a work running to more than six hundred pages, Pott reproduced a full transcript of the entries in the Promus alongside hundreds of parallel passages from the Shakespeare poems and plays. This work has remained virtually unknown for the last one hundred and fifty years because it has been systematically ignored and misrepresented by orthodox Bacon and Shakespeare editors and commentators as it manifestly demonstrates that Bacon is Shakespeare.   

Now here for the first time (unknown to or expanded upon by Pott and other previous scholars and commentators) beyond paralleling hundreds of entries from Bacon’s notebook against his Shakespeare poems and plays, the present work will show how these sources used by Bacon, the Bible, Erasmus, Florio (Italian proverbs), Heywood (English proverbs), and especially the classical poets and dramatists Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence, completely saturate his Shakespeare works, confirming beyond any doubt that he used his private notebook as an aid-to-memory and wellspring for his divine Shakespeare poems and plays.

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER:

Best Shakespeare-Bacon Parallels: 45/885 Examples

Video presented by guitaoist


Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms: 45/885 Examples

Bacon and Shakespeare Parallelisms Paperback – August 24, 2016
by Edwin 1835-1908 Reed (Author)

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript Part 2

by A. Phoenix


THE BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (HITHERTO KNOWN AS
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT) WHICH ORIGINALLY
CONTAINED COPIES OF HIS SHAKESPEARE PLAYS
RICHARD II AND RICHARD III.
By A Phoenix
November 2022

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research


In 1867 an astounding Elizabethan document (c. 1596) was discovered at Northumberland House in London. It should have had the most extraordinary impact on the literary world as it reveals the true author of the Shakespeare works. Instead it was misleadingly named The Northumberland Manuscript and quietly either ignored or misrepresented for over 150 years.

Why?

The manuscript belonging to Francis Bacon contains copies of his early writings and originally his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

The contents page reveals explosive information. The names of both Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare are scribbled repeatedly all over its outer cover.

This is the only contemporary Elizabethan document in the world that features both the names of Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare. Why then is it not the most famous document in the world? Because the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript contains a world changing truth. . .

Francis Bacon is Shakespeare.

For the full story about ‘The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

Part 1 VIDEO: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM

 

The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript

by A. Phoenix


THE BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (HITHERTO KNOWN AS
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT) WHICH ORIGINALLY
CONTAINED COPIES OF HIS SHAKESPEARE PLAYS
RICHARD II AND RICHARD III.
By A Phoenix
November 2022

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research


For the full story about ‘The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM

CONTENTS

1. The Silence of the Shakespeare Scholars p. 6
2. The Discovery of the so-called Northumberland Manuscript p. 12
3. The Outer Cover of Bacon’s Northumberland Manuscript p. 16
4. The Handwriting on the Outer Cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 38
5. The date of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 49
6. The Letters, Religio-Political Tracts and Dramatic Devices still Present in the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript and their links to his other Shakespeare poems and plays p. 51
7. The Anonymous Leicesters Commonwealth the Most Scandalous and Explosive Political Tract of the Elizabethan Era p. 96
8. The Missing Pieces of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript: Letters, Speeches, Essays, Dramatic Devices and Plays p. 150
9. The Shakespeare Plays Richard II and Richard III originally contained within the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 167
10. References p. 200

FACSIMILES

1. The Outer Cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS known as the Northumberland Manuscript p. 18
2. A Modern Rendering of the Outer Cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS
known as the Northumberland Manuscript p. 19
3. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first stanza of The Rape of Lucrece (1594) p. 21
4. The last page of The Rape of Lucrece containing the secret signature F. Bacon p. 22
5. The title page of Ars Adulandi, The Art of Flattery containing the verse scribbled over the outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 25
6. Page 136 of Loves Labours Lost in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio p. 27
7. The title page of the 1598 quarto edition of Loves Labours Lost By W. Shakespere’ incorporating the concealed acrostic BACON p. 29
8. The title page of the 1600 quarto edition of The Merchant of Venice p. 31
9. The title page of the anonymous 1597 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet p. 34
10. The title page of the 1599 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet with its concealed anagram BACON p. 35
11. First page of the 1599 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet with its Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece p. 36
12. The poem by John Davies ‘To our English Terence Mr. Will: Shake-speare’
revealing Bacon is Shakespeare p. 42
13. A facsimile copy of a letter from Francis Bacon to Michael Hicks p. 46
14. An enlarged part of the outside cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare MSS p. 47
15. The Tudor family Hilliard miniatures of Queen Elizabeth, Robert Dudley, and their concealed royal sons, Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux p. 53
16. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece over the dedication page of the first Shakespeare poem Venus and Adonis (1593) p. 54
17. The White Hart Inn at the edge of the Bacon family estate at Gorhambury
with its Mural depicting the Boar and death of Adonis in Venus and Adonis and Bacon’s Boar Crest from the special copy of his Novum Organum p. 57
18. Francis Bacon’s Achievement of Arms headed with the Crest of a Boar p. 58
19. The title page of the 1591 edition of The Troublesome Raigne of Iohn King of England, with the discouerie of King Richard Cordelions Base sonne (vulgarly named, The Bastard Fawconbridge) p. 60
20. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth royal mother of Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex p. 74
21. Portrait of Francis Bacon concealed Prince of Wales heir to the throne p. 75
22. Portrait of Robert Devereux a Royal Tudor Prince p. 76
23. The title page of Bacon’s Sagesse Mysterieuse Des Anciens depicting  allas Athena the Shaker of the Spear from where he derived his nom de plume
Shake-speare with the two mottoes ‘Truth is enveloped by obscurity’ and ‘Thus it shines in the shadows’ p. 78
24. The emblem on the title page of New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians) with the inscription ‘In Time the Hidden Truth Will be Revealed’) p. 79
25. The Pregnancy Portrait of Queen Elizabeth p. 87
26. Portrait of her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester p. 88
27. Portrait of Francis Bacon as a child p. 89
28. The title page of the 1584 edition of Leicesters Commonwealth p. 97
29. The title page of the 1641 edition of Leicesters Commonwealth p. 106
30. The title page of the 1641 edition of Leicesters Commonwealth attributed to Robert Parson p. 107
31. The title page of the 1706 edition Secret Memoirs of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (Leicesters Commonwealth) p. 110
32. The title page of the 1904 edition of the History of Queen Elizabeth, Amy Robsart and the Earl of Leicester (Leicesters Commonwealth) p. 111
33. Deciphered title page of the 1584 edition of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 140
34. The deciphered ‘The Preface of the Conference’ page from Leicesters Commonwealth p. 141
35. The deciphered emblem prefaced to the 1585 French version of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 144
36. The English version/translation of the ‘Addition of the Translator’ appended to the 1585 French version of Leicesters Commonwealth (Exeter College,
Oxford MS 166) p. 145
37. The title page of the 1597 edition of Bacon’s Essays p. 153
38. The title page of the 1598 edition of Bacon’s Essays p. 154
39. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece on the anonymous Epicedivm, A Funerall Song, vpon the vertuous life, and godly death, of the right worshipfull the Lady Helen Branch (1594) p. 158
40. The first page of Epicedivm containing reference to The Rape of Lucrece and Asmund and Cornelia replete with a 33 Bacon cipher p. 159
41. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first sonnet in the 1609 edition of Shakespeares Sonnets p. 160
42. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first verse of A Lovers Complaint with an acrostic spelling out the name of its author Bacon p. 161
43. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the dedication page of Nashes Lenten Stuffe (1599) p. 163
44. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece on the title page of Pierce Pennilesse his supplication to the Diuell (1595) p. 164
45. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1597 edition of Richard III p. 168
46. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the p. 169 1598 edition of Richard III
47. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1597 edition of Richard II p. 170
48. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1598 edition of Richard II p. 171
49. The deciphered title page of the 1597 edition of Richard II p. 195
50. The deciphered title page of the 1597 edition of Richard III p. 196
51. The anagram BACON on the title page of the 1598 edition of Richard III p. 197
52. The deciphered title page of the 1599 edition of The First Part of the Life and Raigne of King Henry IIII p. 198

 

Powered By EmbedPress

46 Great and Rare Quotes about Francis Bacon and the Shakespeare Works

by A. Phoenix


It is little known that there are a substantial number of passages by professors and academics relating to the links and connections between Bacon and Shakespeare. These links appear in largely inaccessible or out of the way learned journals or other difficult to obtain publications that the majority of scholars, students and casual readers are unfamiliar with. I have therefore thought on the basis that they may be of interest to a wider audience to gather them together in one place for those with an interest in Francis Bacon and Shakespeare and the authorship of the Shakespeare works.

Two Formats : One is in text form and the other is the video.

Short paper available here:   https://www.academia.edu/90586683/Great_and_Rare_Quotes_About_Francis_Bacon_and_The_Shakespeare_Works

Great & Rare Quotes About Francis Bacon & The Shakespeare Works

The full text PDF is posted below the YouTube video.

Video here:

 

Powered By EmbedPress