The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: Part 3

Part 3 of the latest masterpiece by A. Phoenix.


THE SECRET OF THE DROESHOUT MASK SYNOPSIS

1 Minute Trailer The Secret of the Droeshout Mask

To the present day the life of Martin Droeshout the enigmatic engraver of the Droeshout engraving prefixed to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is completely shrouded in secrecy and mystery. The silence is deafening. What could be the reason for all this secrecy and silence?

The key central reason is the Droeshout engraving on the title page of the Shakespeare First Folio is a mask behind which its concealed author Francis Bacon is hidden in plain sight, which when removed reveals the truth behind the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion and ludibrium that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere was the author of the greatest literature in the history of the world.

Modern orthodox Shakespeare scholars have conspired in an enormous fraudulent conspiracy and very deliberately lied to the world about the so-called incompetence of its engraver Martin Droeshout to maintain the fiction and illusion William Shakspere wrote the Shakespeare plays.

The key elements of any fraud are very often simple and relatively easy to achieve and execute. The orthodox fraudulent Stratfordian scholar has numerous tools at their disposal. Firstly, they are simply able to take advantage of the trust of their naive uncritical readership who are easily persuaded by a perceived authoritative figure or so-called expert with the accompanying title of professor whose works are published by a prestigious university press. Pitifully, this itself is usually sufficient. Or alternatively, in the face of irrefutable facts and evidence the common response of orthodox Stratfordian scholars is either to simply maintain a wall of silence, or resort to crude systematic suppression and omission. Then there is their well-practiced method of arbitrary distortion and dismissal. Not forgetting of course, the blunt instrument of downright lies and mendacity, all of it skilfully woven into their false, deceitful, and fraudulent narratives.

For centuries the Stratfordian authorities have misled and lied to the world about the one critical fact literally staring us all in the face-the Droeshout engraving is very obviously and irrefutably a mask. The reason why they have repeatedly lied to the world and denied it is a mask is because it would immediately expose the illusion William Shakspere of Stratford wrote the Shakespeare works which in a single devastating and catastrophic stroke would bring the whole fraudulent Stratfordian edifice crashing down all around them.

The secret relationship which has remained hidden for centuries between Francis Bacon and Martin Droeshout the engraver responsible for the iconic image that adorns the title page of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is here revealed for the first time, bringing out of the shadows into the brilliant light of day, our sublime poet-dramatist concealed behind the Droeshout mask, exposing and collapsing the greatest literary fraud of all time.

 

PAPER 1:

The Title Page and Droeshout Mask of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio Concealing its Secret Author Francis Bacon

VIDEO 1:

https://youtu.be/v82gTnhCkwI

 
 

PAPER 2:

To The Reader Prefixed to the Shakespeare First Folio Opposite the Droeshout Mask signed with the initials B. I. for Ben Jonson

VIDEO 2:

https://youtu.be/v82gTnhCkwI

The entire book by A. Phoenix will be shared over the coming weeks and the discussion will continue on the SirBacon.org B’Hive Forum.

The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion

by A. Phoenix


Announcing The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion. The book is available at
The_1623_Shakespeare_First_Folio_A_Baconian_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Illusion

Coming in at 404 pages we are also publishing selected chapters as smaller stand alone papers with accompanying videos. Each paper and video will concentrate on a selected facet of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio.

Follow the discussion on the B’Hive Forum here on SirBacon.org:

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/index.php?/forum/29-the-1623-shakespeare-first-folio-a-baconian-rosicrucian-freemasonic-illusion/

Introduction

On the 400th anniversary of the publication of the First Folio, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion uncovers and reveals unknown and untold secrets about the greatest work of literature in the history of humankind. Here for the first time, it brings forth the hidden and concealed connections of its secret author Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood with all the key members involved in its production, printing, and publication. It explores his hidden relationships with its printers William and Isaac Jaggard, and the other members of the First Folio consortium, John Smethwick, William Aspley, and its publisher Edward Blount. It is almost universally unknown that its dedicatee William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke was at the time of its dedication Grand Master of England, one of half of the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’, with his brother Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, whose joint open and hidden relationships with Bacon went back decades. The other important critical member in the production of the 1623 First Folio was its editor and contributor of its two verses Ben Jonson who at the time the Folio was making its way through the Jaggard printing presses was living with Bacon at Gorhambury, where he was at the heart of the secret plans for bringing together this vast and complex enterprise.

The Droeshout engraving on the title page of the most famous secular work in English history is iconic and recognised the world over as the contemporary face of William Shakespeare the greatest poet and dramatist of all time. In strikingly marked contrast virtually nothing is known about Martin Droeshout the draughtsman responsible for the most recognisable literary image since time immemorial. A remarkable level of secrecy still surrounds his private life, friends and the social and professional circles he moved in, even though he self-evidently knew some of the most important figures in Jacobean England and moved in the highest circles of his times. This man who for the first thirty-three years of his life lived in the heart of London has scarcely left any documentary trace of his existence akin to him having been deliberately expunged from the records. To the present day his whole life is completely shrouded in secrecy and mystery. The silence is deafening. What could be the reason for all this secrecy and silence? The key reason is the Droeshout engraving on the title page of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is a mask behind which its concealed author Francis Bacon is hidden in plain sight, which when lifted reveals the truth behind the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion and ludibrium that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere of Stratford was the author of the greatest literature in the history of the world. This illusion revealed, with one devastating stroke brings the whole Stratfordian fiction crashing to the ground.

For the first time, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion conveys an explosive secret in making known the concealed and hidden relationship between Francis Bacon and Martin Droeshout which has been suppressed for the last four hundred years. Their secret relationship is encapsulated in an earlier Droeshout engraving titled Doctor Panurgus (c. 1621) wherein one of its central figures is a depiction of Francis Bacon replete with a series of clues and indicators to confirm it.

The figure of Bacon in the Dr Panurgus engraving by Droeshout dating from the early 1620s is drawn from life, which points to Bacon sitting for it at Gorhambury. The complex engraving has clearly been carefully planned and must have involved Bacon giving Droeshout instructions and further directions that over a period of time necessitated numerous revision and amendments, not unlike the Droeshout in the First Folio, which exists in three known states, showing close attention to minor details as well as slight changes made to various aspects of it. This process was taking place around the time Bacon was planning and preparing his Shakespeare plays for the Jaggard printing house during the years 1621 to 1623 when it is likely that Droeshout made numerous visits to see Bacon at his country estate at Gorhambury where he was most likely residing for periods with Bacon and Ben Jonson as part of his entourage of good pens and other artists that made up his literary workshop.

The work also lift the veil of secrecy surrounding the hitherto unknown relationships between Francis Bacon and the other little-known figures Hugh Holland, James Mabbe and Leonard Digges who contributed verses to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Particularly, Bacon’s relationship with Leonard Digges, whose father Sir Nicholas Bacon was the special patron of his grandfather and father Leonard Digges and Thomas Digges, the poet whose verse prefixed to the First Folio refers to the Stratford Monument, which is adorned with Rosicrucian-Freemasonic symbols and Baconian ciphers, secretly commissioned by Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

It is little known that the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio contains a series of special Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic AA and Archer headpieces cryptically incorporating the monogram of Francis Bacon and in the case of the latter spelling out his name F. Bacon. Across the address by Ben Jonson in the First Folio ‘To the memory of my beloued, The AVTHOR Mr. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE: AND what he hath left vs’, written during the period he was living with Bacon at Gorhambury, appears the Freemasonic Seven Set Squares headpiece, indicating to other members of the Brotherhood that Bacon was the concealed author behind the pseudonym Shakespeare and the secret Grand Master of all Freemasons who rules by the Square, with ‘what he has left vs’, alluding to the secret Freemasonic system left to the world for the future benefit of humankind. Beyond the fact that the Freemasonic Seven Set Squares appears over the Ben Jonson address in the Folio, the same headpiece appears numerous times throughout the volume over the following Shakespeare plays: The Merry Wives of Windsor, Much Ado About Nothing, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, King John, I Henry IV, 2 Henry IV, Richard III, Henry VIII, Romeo and Juliet, Timon of Athens and Hamlet.

In addition to all the above cryptic devices secretly inserted by Bacon in the Shakespeare First Folio there are also many remarkable and astonishing references and allusions to himself and members of the Bacon family, which for four hundred years have remained unfamiliar or unknown to the ordinary schoolmen, the casual student, and effectively the rest of the world. These include references and allusions to himself in several different plays where the character is in some instances named Francis and similarly where characters are named after his three brothers Sir Nicholas Bacon, Sir Nathaniel Bacon, and Anthony Bacon. Similarly in the First Folio there are references and allusions to his father and mother Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Cooke Bacon, her sisters Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell and her husband John, Lord Russell, Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil and her husband William Cecil, Lord Burghley, as well as their offspring (Bacon’s cousins) Thomas Posthumous Hoby and Sir Robert Cecil, and the son of their brother William Cooke, named after his father, Bacon’s other cousin, known as William Cooke of Highnam Court in Gloucester.

In recent times a very substantial body of academic literature has been produced by orthodox critics and commentators surrounding the subject of Shakespeare and anagrams. Individually and collectively these writings illustrate and determine that not only was Shakespeare, the greatest poet of his age, but he was its greatest anagrammatist. In the First Folio Bacon secretly inserts numerous acrostics and anagrams confirming his authorship among them: I AM FRA[NCIS] BACON, FRANCIS BACON, FRAN [CIS] BACON, F BACON, BY ONE BACON, BY BACON, and BACON.

The Shakespeare First Folio embodies the philosophy and teachings of Freemasonry and contains overt and covert references and allusions to its secret practices, protocols, and customs. It is intimately familiar with knowledge of its degrees of initiations, and the constitution, rules, and regular workings of the Lodge. It is also familiar with the language and terminology of the Freemasonry Brotherhood, its secret signs, handshakes, and other forms of greetings and identification. It is most importantly saturated with the grand philosophical scheme of Bacon to regenerate the world and unite humankind into a truly global society based upon peace and love, the declared aim of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, to bring about over time the Universal Reformation of the Whole World.

Francis Bacon’s Private Notebook with Hundreds of Parallels in his Shakespeare Works – The Promus

by A. Phoenix


SirBacon.org is excited to share the following work by A. Phoenix on the 462nd Birthday of Sir Francis Bacon, January 22, 2023.

Francis Bacon’s Private Manuscript Notebook (Known as the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies) The Source of Several Hundred Resemblances, Correspondences and Parallels Found Throughout his Shakespeare Poems and Plays

By A. Phoenix
January 2023

In ordinary circumstances this contemporary manuscript document named the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies would be well known to every Bacon and Shakespeare scholar and student of English literature around the world.

Bacon’s unique private notebook held at the British Library contains a total of 51 leaves numbered pages 83 to 132 all written (apart from some French proverbs) in his own hand. The Folio numbered 85 is headed ‘Promus’ and beneath it appears the date ‘Dec. 5, 1594’ with the Folio numbered 114 headed ‘Formularies Promus’ carrying the date ‘27 Jan. 1595’ (i.e., January 1596).

It contains 1655 entries jotted down as an aid to his memory.

The entries include single words, phrases, lines, turns of speech, metaphors, similes, aphorisms, and various moral and philosophical observations. These include entries drawn from the Bible; Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, and English proverbs; and lines and verses from classical poets and dramatists, among them, Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence.

This private notebook was used by Bacon as a literary storehouse from where he developed, expanded, and introduced ideas and themes into his acknowledged writings and works. 

In Shakespeare Studies in Baconian Light R. M. Theobald produced a list of around 500 Promus entries used by Bacon in his acknowledged writings, a number the orthodox scholar Charles Crawford stated could be significantly added to, and following his detailed study of the Promus in The Bacon Shakespeare Question N. B. Cockburn put the number at about 600. More recently, its modern editors Professor Stewart and Dr Knight in The Oxford Francis BaconEarly Writings 1584-1596 (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2012) specified that during a period of thirty years Bacon utilised these entries in the Promus for usage in a diverse range of categories and genres that included his private letters, speeches, dramatic devices, essays, religio-political tracts, legal writings, and several of his philosophical and scientific works.

In 1883 the indefatigable Baconian scholar Constance M. Pott published her monumental work entitled The Promus of Formularies and Elegancies (Being Private Notescirc1594hitherto unpublishedby Francis Bacon Illustrated and Elucidated by Passages from Shakespeare.

In a work running to more than six hundred pages, Pott reproduced a full transcript of the entries in the Promus alongside hundreds of parallel passages from the Shakespeare poems and plays. This work has remained virtually unknown for the last one hundred and fifty years because it has been systematically ignored and misrepresented by orthodox Bacon and Shakespeare editors and commentators as it manifestly demonstrates that Bacon is Shakespeare.   

Now here for the first time (unknown to or expanded upon by Pott and other previous scholars and commentators) beyond paralleling hundreds of entries from Bacon’s notebook against his Shakespeare poems and plays, the present work will show how these sources used by Bacon, the Bible, Erasmus, Florio (Italian proverbs), Heywood (English proverbs), and especially the classical poets and dramatists Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence, completely saturate his Shakespeare works, confirming beyond any doubt that he used his private notebook as an aid-to-memory and wellspring for his divine Shakespeare poems and plays.

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER:

The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript Part 2

by A. Phoenix


THE BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (HITHERTO KNOWN AS
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT) WHICH ORIGINALLY
CONTAINED COPIES OF HIS SHAKESPEARE PLAYS
RICHARD II AND RICHARD III.
By A Phoenix
November 2022

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research


In 1867 an astounding Elizabethan document (c. 1596) was discovered at Northumberland House in London. It should have had the most extraordinary impact on the literary world as it reveals the true author of the Shakespeare works. Instead it was misleadingly named The Northumberland Manuscript and quietly either ignored or misrepresented for over 150 years.

Why?

The manuscript belonging to Francis Bacon contains copies of his early writings and originally his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

The contents page reveals explosive information. The names of both Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare are scribbled repeatedly all over its outer cover.

This is the only contemporary Elizabethan document in the world that features both the names of Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare. Why then is it not the most famous document in the world? Because the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript contains a world changing truth. . .

Francis Bacon is Shakespeare.

For the full story about ‘The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

Part 1 VIDEO: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM

 

The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript

by A. Phoenix


THE BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (HITHERTO KNOWN AS
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT) WHICH ORIGINALLY
CONTAINED COPIES OF HIS SHAKESPEARE PLAYS
RICHARD II AND RICHARD III.
By A Phoenix
November 2022

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research


For the full story about ‘The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

VIDEO: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM

CONTENTS

1. The Silence of the Shakespeare Scholars p. 6
2. The Discovery of the so-called Northumberland Manuscript p. 12
3. The Outer Cover of Bacon’s Northumberland Manuscript p. 16
4. The Handwriting on the Outer Cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 38
5. The date of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 49
6. The Letters, Religio-Political Tracts and Dramatic Devices still Present in the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript and their links to his other Shakespeare poems and plays p. 51
7. The Anonymous Leicesters Commonwealth the Most Scandalous and Explosive Political Tract of the Elizabethan Era p. 96
8. The Missing Pieces of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript: Letters, Speeches, Essays, Dramatic Devices and Plays p. 150
9. The Shakespeare Plays Richard II and Richard III originally contained within the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 167
10. References p. 200

FACSIMILES

1. The Outer Cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS known as the Northumberland Manuscript p. 18
2. A Modern Rendering of the Outer Cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS
known as the Northumberland Manuscript p. 19
3. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first stanza of The Rape of Lucrece (1594) p. 21
4. The last page of The Rape of Lucrece containing the secret signature F. Bacon p. 22
5. The title page of Ars Adulandi, The Art of Flattery containing the verse scribbled over the outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript p. 25
6. Page 136 of Loves Labours Lost in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio p. 27
7. The title page of the 1598 quarto edition of Loves Labours Lost By W. Shakespere’ incorporating the concealed acrostic BACON p. 29
8. The title page of the 1600 quarto edition of The Merchant of Venice p. 31
9. The title page of the anonymous 1597 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet p. 34
10. The title page of the 1599 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet with its concealed anagram BACON p. 35
11. First page of the 1599 quarto edition of Romeo and Juliet with its Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece p. 36
12. The poem by John Davies ‘To our English Terence Mr. Will: Shake-speare’
revealing Bacon is Shakespeare p. 42
13. A facsimile copy of a letter from Francis Bacon to Michael Hicks p. 46
14. An enlarged part of the outside cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare MSS p. 47
15. The Tudor family Hilliard miniatures of Queen Elizabeth, Robert Dudley, and their concealed royal sons, Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux p. 53
16. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece over the dedication page of the first Shakespeare poem Venus and Adonis (1593) p. 54
17. The White Hart Inn at the edge of the Bacon family estate at Gorhambury
with its Mural depicting the Boar and death of Adonis in Venus and Adonis and Bacon’s Boar Crest from the special copy of his Novum Organum p. 57
18. Francis Bacon’s Achievement of Arms headed with the Crest of a Boar p. 58
19. The title page of the 1591 edition of The Troublesome Raigne of Iohn King of England, with the discouerie of King Richard Cordelions Base sonne (vulgarly named, The Bastard Fawconbridge) p. 60
20. Portrait of Queen Elizabeth royal mother of Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex p. 74
21. Portrait of Francis Bacon concealed Prince of Wales heir to the throne p. 75
22. Portrait of Robert Devereux a Royal Tudor Prince p. 76
23. The title page of Bacon’s Sagesse Mysterieuse Des Anciens depicting  allas Athena the Shaker of the Spear from where he derived his nom de plume
Shake-speare with the two mottoes ‘Truth is enveloped by obscurity’ and ‘Thus it shines in the shadows’ p. 78
24. The emblem on the title page of New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians) with the inscription ‘In Time the Hidden Truth Will be Revealed’) p. 79
25. The Pregnancy Portrait of Queen Elizabeth p. 87
26. Portrait of her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester p. 88
27. Portrait of Francis Bacon as a child p. 89
28. The title page of the 1584 edition of Leicesters Commonwealth p. 97
29. The title page of the 1641 edition of Leicesters Commonwealth p. 106
30. The title page of the 1641 edition of Leicesters Commonwealth attributed to Robert Parson p. 107
31. The title page of the 1706 edition Secret Memoirs of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (Leicesters Commonwealth) p. 110
32. The title page of the 1904 edition of the History of Queen Elizabeth, Amy Robsart and the Earl of Leicester (Leicesters Commonwealth) p. 111
33. Deciphered title page of the 1584 edition of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 140
34. The deciphered ‘The Preface of the Conference’ page from Leicesters Commonwealth p. 141
35. The deciphered emblem prefaced to the 1585 French version of Leicester’s Commonwealth p. 144
36. The English version/translation of the ‘Addition of the Translator’ appended to the 1585 French version of Leicesters Commonwealth (Exeter College,
Oxford MS 166) p. 145
37. The title page of the 1597 edition of Bacon’s Essays p. 153
38. The title page of the 1598 edition of Bacon’s Essays p. 154
39. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece on the anonymous Epicedivm, A Funerall Song, vpon the vertuous life, and godly death, of the right worshipfull the Lady Helen Branch (1594) p. 158
40. The first page of Epicedivm containing reference to The Rape of Lucrece and Asmund and Cornelia replete with a 33 Bacon cipher p. 159
41. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first sonnet in the 1609 edition of Shakespeares Sonnets p. 160
42. The monogram of Francis Bacon commencing the first verse of A Lovers Complaint with an acrostic spelling out the name of its author Bacon p. 161
43. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the dedication page of Nashes Lenten Stuffe (1599) p. 163
44. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece on the title page of Pierce Pennilesse his supplication to the Diuell (1595) p. 164
45. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1597 edition of Richard III p. 168
46. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the p. 169 1598 edition of Richard III
47. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1597 edition of Richard II p. 170
48. The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece above the first page of the 1598 edition of Richard II p. 171
49. The deciphered title page of the 1597 edition of Richard II p. 195
50. The deciphered title page of the 1597 edition of Richard III p. 196
51. The anagram BACON on the title page of the 1598 edition of Richard III p. 197
52. The deciphered title page of the 1599 edition of The First Part of the Life and Raigne of King Henry IIII p. 198

 

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46 Great and Rare Quotes about Francis Bacon and the Shakespeare Works

by A. Phoenix


It is little known that there are a substantial number of passages by professors and academics relating to the links and connections between Bacon and Shakespeare. These links appear in largely inaccessible or out of the way learned journals or other difficult to obtain publications that the majority of scholars, students and casual readers are unfamiliar with. I have therefore thought on the basis that they may be of interest to a wider audience to gather them together in one place for those with an interest in Francis Bacon and Shakespeare and the authorship of the Shakespeare works.

Two Formats : One is in text form and the other is the video.

Short paper available here:   https://www.academia.edu/90586683/Great_and_Rare_Quotes_About_Francis_Bacon_and_The_Shakespeare_Works

Great & Rare Quotes About Francis Bacon & The Shakespeare Works

The full text PDF is posted below the YouTube video.

Video here:

 

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