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Special Bacon-Shakespeare Title Pages & Emblems


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And here is more strange magic ! 😉 

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B (2) + W (21) + H (8) + T (19) + H (8) + F (6) = 64

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E (5) + 8 + S (18) + A (1) + I (9) + E (5) + S (18) = 64

Today is the 6/04 ! 🙂

"Will sourly leave her till he have prevail'd?"

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Thanks to the Sonnets Pyramid of Rob, Light-of-Truth

 

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This is probably something that has already been discovered by the past,

but that I am discovering today (6/04) thanks to the number 64.

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Page 64 of The first Part of King Henry the Fourth (384th page of the First Folio)

I AM F.B., BACO, F. BACON, the Knight of the burning Lampe !

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Quote

This is probably something that has already been discovered by the past,

Not that I know of.

But you are a fresh EYE on everything. I saw 64 come up today in other places and had nothing to connect. Then you brought up 64 which was on my mind already.

Keep doing what you do, if I hit the Power Ball we all have a chuck of cash to quit everything else and spend ALL (isnum2er) our time following our bliss. 🙂

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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The two title pages (First and Second State) of the 1668 edition of Lord Bacon's Essays with its accompanying engraving of the Great One holding a symbolic 'seal/purse' with a caption below. 

It will be observed that in the First State it reads 'Thmas Ratcliffe' and in the Second State 'Thomas Ratcliffe'.

68 essays.webp

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conceited Tragedie

con and c with the last c = 3 Simple cipher, or a = 1 and b = 2.

So then: con and ab which can be arranged as bacon.

Tragedie is 67 Simple cipher, the same as FRANCIS.

Do we have Francis Bacon on the third line? Or am I cheating a little and going too far. 😉

Remove the "conc" and we have "eited Tragedie" which is an anagram for:

Agree [Francis Bacon] Edited It

 

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Hi A Phoenix,

THE PROLOGUE

T VVo houshold Frends ...
    In faire Verona ...
    Form civill ...
VVhose civill ...
From forth ...
A paire of ...
...
Is now the two howres ...
The which if you ...
VVhat here we want wee'l ...

FrAncis VVilliam Tudor😊

 

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T T as Thirty Three. 33 is the Simple cipher of BACON.

T through the "u" of Iuliet into "word" for the "ord" is Tudor, with the "w" of word and "il" and another "l" in "I'le" for will, and the "I" of "I'le" for I, or the First. Will Tudor I.

Big G is 33 Kaye cipher, 33 is Simple cipher for BACON.

Regorie is 74 Simple cipher, 74 is Simple cipher for TUDOR.

G Regorie = BACON TUDOR

F Bacon acrostics, self-explanatory with examples that show 2 and another not highlighted in the first three lines.

Nice way to start "Romeo and Iuliet" in 1597. 🙂

 

 

 

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Interesting, since we've talked about the word "Two" on this forum a bit, notice that the first word of the Prologue is TWO, and the last word on page 33 is "Two".

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https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/BL_Q1_Rom/33/index.html%3Fzoom=490.html

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Still on the 33rd page...

I AM BACON, and "wit" is repeated several times on the page. WIT = WTI, WILLIAM TUDOR I?

67 words lead up to "I am":

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There is this rather curious line that tells us to add "broad" to "goose" which proves thee "faire" (Royal):

Rom: I stretcht it out for the word broad, which added to
the goose, proues thee faire and wide a broad goose.

A BROAD GOOSE is 102 Simple cipher using the 26 letter codes. With the old alphabet:

ONE HUNDRED TWO is 157 Simple, 168 Reverse, 58 Short, and 287 Kaye ciphers the same as WILLIAM TUDOR I.

I pointed out that the last word on the page is "Two" above. The first line of the next page is, "Two, two, a shirt and a smocke." All theses "Two's"! 🙂

Mather Walker:

https://sirbacon.org/mrandJ2.htm

The quartos also referred to Romeo and Juliet as "an excellent conceited tragedy." The First Folio is missing both this, and the prologue, a fact which obscures the sense of the play. In Elizabethan days "Conceited" meant some theme, device, or idea was concealed in the play. The chorus lets us in on the secret: "Two opposing houses"; "star-crossed", "two hours" traffic." These are all astrological references. A horoscope, in astrology, is divided into 12 houses. The houses directly opposite each other are called "opposing houses." "Star-crossed" applies to planets in opposing houses. The 12 houses of a horoscope comprise the 24 hour daily cycle, so each house represents two hours.

It is a must read article. More from it:

And we see in the play Mercutio and Benvolio as companions of Romeo. Although it is unusual to symbolize Venus as a man, Benvolio is given all the astrological characteristics of Venus in the play. Benvolio means well wishing, and benevolent.

By repeatedly trying to act as a peace-maker Benvolio shows his character is not only consonant with his name, but with the astrological attributes of Venus who represents benevolence and peace-making as well as love. (Benvolio is probably symbolized as a man because in the other, "alchemistic", symbolism of the play, where the trio represents the three basic alchemistic elements of salt, mercury, and sulphur, salt is an active, or masculine element.)

At this point I am limited in my knowledge to understand some of the Key elements concealed in the cryptic words on this page. I can understand a few numbers and recognize there is more to see, such as:

Ben: Stop there.
Me: Why thou wouldst haue me stopp my tale against
the haire.

Ben: Thou wouldst haue made thy tale too long?
Mer: Tut man thou art deceiued, I meant to make it
short, for I was come to the whole depth of my tale?

Bacon's "tale", his story.

Synchronicity that another topic yesterday brought up Astrology. Kate said, "Astrology/Astronomy is actually a major key to interpreting what’s encoded in Shakespeare. It all comes back to Mercury! "

(Kate, I am putting your book on one of my tablets to keep by my bed so I can READ it!) 🙂

 

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It is universally agreed by Shakespeare scholars that the name/pseudonym William Shakespeare first appeared on the title page of one of the Shakespeare plays in the 1598 quarto edition of Love's Labour's Lost. The title page reads 'By W. Shakespere' but if we start with the letter B and read up the page it forms the acrostic BACON, cryptically revealing Love's Labour's Lost is written by Bacon behind his literary mask William Shakespeare.   

lll98.webp

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"Loves labors lost" initials LLL add up to 33 Simple cipher as does BACON.

"Conceited Comedie" initials are CC, or C=3 and C=3 for 33.

The Short cipher of "loves labors lost" is 67 as is FRANCIS.

"By W. Shakespeare" is 201 Reverse cipher and as we have seen ONE HUNDRED TWO and TWO HUNDRED ONE have the same four cipher numbers as WILLIAM TUDOR I, 157 Simple, 168 Reverse, 58 Short, and 287 Kaye.

Note that 157 Simple, 168 Reverse, and 287 Kaye ciphers are also the same as FRA ROSI CROSSE.

The Reverse cipher of "loves labors lost" is 182 and ONE EIGHTY TWO is 157 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher as well.

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5 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Still on the 33rd page...

I AM BACON, and "wit" is repeated several times on the page. WIT = WTI, WILLIAM TUDOR I?

Hi Rob,

We can say that you have been on the go 😀 ! Great findings !  And I LOVE the "WILL TUDOR I" that you found on the first  page of Romeo and Juliet.

On my side, I studied the Prologue, and I think that I know now why the First Folio is missing it. 😁

As you say, all is about "WIT" or WTI, WILLIAM TUDOR I ! 

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https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/BL_Q1_Rom/3/index.html%3Fzoom=490.html

Ver means Truth in latin.

Notice that the text is off centered contrarly to "The Prologue"

Thus, the "T" of "The Prologue" is above the "d" of "hold" and it allows to form the name "TUDOR"

And right next to TUDOR , we have FR. BACO ( or FR. BACON with the n of Verona)

Then, we have : "The mark of wee'l (Will) is WIT"

Interestingly enough, "death-markt" is the 57th word ( By counting star-crost and death-markt as 1)

57 is the simple cipher of FRA. BACON

You have twice WTI  (William Tudor I) in acrostic and also TUDOR ! 

Indeed, I noticed that this is not a "A" in "A paire" but an "inverted V".

I took it like an invitation to invert the following letter "p" 😉 

Then, you have the word "TWO" that appears three times.

I remind you that 222 is the gematria of AA, in relation with the AA headpiece.

Moreover the 3 "TWO" are respectively the 1st, 35th, and 66th word.

1+35+66 = 102

ONE HUNDRED TWO = WILLIAM TUDOR I 😀

And finally, I noticed that there was a space in the word " int o" enmitie.

I felt that it was a clue . I found the word "hold" in diagonal.

And by following the diagonal I discovered the word "Stooge" !!!

It gives is us  : " The Stooge (Shaksper ?) hold our scene."

 

Edited by Allisnum2er
Typos
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On 4/13/2022 at 6:04 PM, A Phoenix said:

THIS IS AN EARLY 1597 QUARTO EDITION OF ROMEO AND JULIET BEFORE THE PSEUDONYM WILLIAM SHAKE-SPEARE HAD APPEARED ON THE TITLE PAGE OF ONE OF LORD BACON'S SHAKESPEARE PLAYS. 

R&J97.png

Hi AP what’s the scribble at the base of The Prologue? Do you know? Also, excuse my ignorance on this but who was this 1597 R & J attributed to at the time?  Thanks K

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Hi Kate, As far as I am aware, as the work was published anonymously and no play had appeared with the pseudonym William Shake-speare on its title page (the first being Love's Labour's Lost in 1598) I assume that apart from those in the secret (or the know) that the rest of the Elizabethan public were none the wiser as to its true authorship. But there is always the possibility that there was some frivolous speculation that someone else may have written it at the time-none of which ever gained any traction.   

As far as the scribble at the base of the Prologue goes it looks curiously like FRANCIS but your guess is as good as mine. 

Kate, I will be responding to your post on Oxford later today (I have just got to go and do some 'real life' boring stuff first!). 

 

 

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Of course, no rush. Enjoy your Easter 

I’ve played around with the headpiece. I may just be seeing things. 

3F87EE90-E88D-406D-8728-ED3E9B5D5764.jpeg.b79b1d6687a4f208a172a637f3e51765.jpeg
 

(The A could actually be next to the B too). I see an acorn (acon) - oak? -too. It’s a sharper point than in the right. 
 

There’s a definite G top-left that’s not mirrored in the top-right corner.

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The Links between The Attourneys Academy and the First Folio and the Othello Revisions illustrating Lord Bacon's Authorship of the Shakespeare Works.

In the same year the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio was first published to the world another work, a little less known to posterity and the world, was also printed at London, which if known to orthodox Bacon and Shakespeare scholars, has been overlooked, ignored, or systematically suppressed. This work (apparently) written by the lawyer, poet and author Thomas Powell entitled The Attourneys Academy is dedicated to the king, and several others, including Francis Bacon. The reason this revealing dedication to Bacon is not reproduced by his orthodox editors, biographers and commentators, is it very obviously alludes to Bacon’s secret authorship of the Shakespeare poems and plays, with its theatrical metaphor of pulling the curtain back before letting it fall again.   

In 1630 (apologies for the quality of the title page) another edition of The Attourneys Academy appeared with the same dedication to Lord Bacon but this time with a different headpiece. The same headpiece appeared over the address to The Stationer to the Reader in the first quarto edition of Othello published in 1622. Now between the 1622 quarto version of Othello and the version of Othello that appeared a year later in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio something very strange happened:

'It first appeared in print in a quarto of 1622; the version printed in the 1623 Folio is about 160 lines longer, and has over a thousand differences in wording.'

[Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor, eds., William Shakespeare The Complete Works Second Edition (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2005), p. 873]

With breathtaking front and audacity orthodox Shakespeare scholars either ignore the obvious implications of this or alternatively offer specious and fallacious arguments to try and explain it away.

The 160 lines and more than a thousand differences in wording are all or nearly all (a few printers errors aside) authorial which in a single stroke goes to the very heart of the authorship issue. Marlowe died in 1593; Oxford died in 1604; and Willy from Stratford in 1616. So accordingly, these dead men were not able to carry out these enormous amounts of authorial changes between 1622 and 1623. But guess what?: the true author of Othello Lord Bacon was still very much alive in 1622-3 working with Ben Jonson (contributor of two verses to the Folio) at Gorhambury while FB carried out these revisions and amendments as the Shakespeare First Folio was making its way through the Jaggard printing press.

 

 

 

 

 

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Othello.webp

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OK, here is an obvious poem with a hidden meaning:

O Giue me leave to pull the Curtaine by,
     That clouds they Worth is such obscurity.
Good Seneca, stay but a while thy bleeding,
T’accept what I receiued at the Reading :
Here I present it in a solemne strayne,
And this I pluckt the Curtayne backe again.

A circle, zero, and the letter "O" have been a symbol for cipher for centuries:

https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/cipher

Cipher comes from the Arabic sifr, which means "nothing" or "zero." The word came to Europe along with the Arabic numeral system. As early codes substituted numerals for letters to hide the word’s meaning, codes became known as ciphers. If you crack a cipher, you break the code and can understand the message.

The capital letters that start the lines (including G after the O on the first line) are "O G T G T H A"

G is 33 Kaye cipher which is the Simple cipher of BACON. Even though we already know this poem is to Bacon from Thomas Powell, with the O as clue there is a cipher, starting with a G makes sense and is an intro to the rest.

There is an apostrophe after the T in "T'accept" to suggest a "pause" or breaking point to just add up G T G T which are the capital letters after the O as a clue there is a cipher.

GTGT adds up to 52 Simple cipher, the same as WILL. Could be WILL TUDOR or WILL SHAKESPEARE.

Add up all the letters, OGTGTHA and we have:

image.png.6d3ceaf31cffa80299d995c5b43da165.png

The Reverse cipher is 100 which is the Simple cipher of FRANCIS BACON. OK, makes sense as this poem is to Bacon. The plain easy to find ciphers as the "Curtaine" is pulled back are all Bacon. G = 33 Kaye cipher, appearing twice. Two T's which hint at Thirty Three are present as well (G T G T).

Now look at the numbers using the 26 letter codes. It's been proven there were 26 letters (including J and U) in Bacon's and Shakespeare's lifetime. Yet it's likely that the 26 letters codes were not as popular among those who knew about ciphers at the time. So the next level of cipher numbers, above the obvious Bacon numbers just mentioned, tell much more.

Simple cipher 78 is the Kaye cipher of WILL using the traditional codes.

Reverse cipher 111 is the Kaye cipher of BACON using the traditional codes.

Short cipher 33 is the Simple cipher of BACON using the traditional codes.

And then, 182 Kaye cipher.

ONE EIGHTY TWO adds up to 157 Simple cipher and 287 Kaye cipher using the traditional codes.

Ok, we know FRA ROSI CROSSE adds up to 157 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher as does WILLIAM TUDOR I.

So we have the Secret Shakespearean Seal numbers that we see so often. The "Curtaine" is pulled back and we start to see what we are supposed to see.

Shakespeare's Sonnets in 1609 and the First Folio in 1623 have been demonstrated to be Sealed with the numbers 157 and 287 in numerous ways. It must have been a blast for those few who knew it to count, add up, and discovery what they knew was there. Shakespeare's works were the BIG productions that were Sealed for insiders to enjoy behind the veil. Into the future the FRA ROSI CROSSE made use of the same numbers to Seal their works.

Connecting Bacon overtly in plain text, then next using easy ciphers, while pulling back the Curtaine, allows we who look for more to find numbers 157 and 287 which are strongly linked to Shakespeare's works making the connection of Bacon with Shakespeare. We also see "WILL" as another connection to Shakespeare and I believe, WILLIAM TUDOR. Remember Bacon comes right out and says, "my name is Will" in Sonnet 136. And 136 is the Simple cipher for BACON SHAKESPEARE.

In the past weeks on this forum I tend to promote my personal idea that 157 and 287 refer to WILLIAM TUDOR I, being a theory I have believed for 20 years or so. In the past 100 years we Baconians have known the connection of those numbers with FRA ROSI CROSSE which is more widely accepted. However, it is important to also know the numbers 157 and 287 were blatantly demonstrated in Shakespeare's works as the Seal of those works. So when we see Bacon and Rosicrucian books and ideas Sealed with 157 and 287, we need to remember Shakespeare's works were the most important place where they are integrated and to be found. All three are intricately woven together; Bacon (William Tudor), Shakespeare, and the Rosicrucians. The Secret Shakespearean Seal numbers are a highly visible thread connecting them.

 

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O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Look at the preceding page, especially inside the red box I added:

image.png.3d890686c47a0d234f95b0c4648f7e93.png
https://archive.org/details/attourneysacadem00powe/page/n13/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

Then will I sing thy Fortune and thy Fame,
   and prove, that Williams from the Troians came:
Shewe, where his Auncestors long since did build
   a Seate, which hitherto their Name hath fill’d.

33 words in the four lines above.

"Williams"? Obvious William the Conqueror, or "William I" as he is also called.

https://diplomatic-arts.org/blog/references-to-historical-justice-as-an-old-established-practice/

In 1066, the Normans produced a very similar argument to justify the Conquest of England. The kingdom’s crown, they claimed, had been promised to William, ducal sovereign of Normandy, because he, along with his barons and knights, had every right to rule the invaded land. Such entitlement, in addition to other notions, was explained by the duke’s and his people’s descent from the ancient Trojans. The legends of the medieval epoch heralded that the monarchical polity of Britain had been founded by a band of Trojan drifters. Their leader and the first king of the Britons, as this fabula tells us, was a noble prince by the name of Brutus – the grandson of famous Aeneas. At the end of the 10th century, Normandy’s court historians concocted a genealogy that was to represent the dukedom’s population as the progeny of Antenor – another prince of the Trojan House. The dynasty of William the Conqueror and its Plantagenet successors (1154-1485) used the said lineage to portray the 1066 debellatio as the Trojans’ return to the Trojan country.

Why plural? Williams. Behind the "Curtaine", exactly opposite on the facing page, is the poem saying Bacon is a "William" descended from William the Conqueror, William I?

We've seen a good example of a facing pages cipher in the first page of the Tempest. Even though the page on the left was not "To" Bacon, with secrets and ciphers involved it may indeed be to Bacon after all.

Now may that Name and Honour ne’er expire.
But in a melting Firmament of Fire.

EDIT: On the first page of the Tempest, it is a facing "columns" cipher on the same page. But not unlike the above on facing pages.

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