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The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA Headpieces in Editions of Shakespeare Poems, Quartos & Folios


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4 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Ok, an old dog learning a new trick. 🙂

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Back to my old tricks...

157 characters up to "conuertest". There are 22 words up to the word "bloud" which has the "b" to spell Bacon. Add 22 to the 11 on top of the Sonnet, you get 33 the Simple cipher of Bacon. Counting the characters, the "b" of "bloud" is the 92nd character, and 92 is the Reverse cipher of Bacon.

Original spelling:

AS fast as thou shalt wane so fast thou grow'st,
In one of thine, from that which thou departest,
And that fresh bloud which yongly thou bestow'st,
Thou maist call thine, when thou from youth conuertest,
Herein liues wisdome, beauty, and increase,
Without this follie, age, and could decay,
If all were minded so, the times should cease,
And threescoore yeare would make the world away:
Let those whom nature hath not made for store,
Harsh, featurelesse, and rude , barrenly perrish,
Looke whom she best indow'd, she gaue the more;
Which bountious guift thou shouldst in bounty cherrish,
   She caru'd thee for her seale, and ment therby,
   Thou shouldst print more, not let that coppy die.

 

 

What about the "I I", the eleven of Sonnet 11? Two ones? Two A's? A Double A?

I = 9 Simple cipher.

9+9=18

9x9=81

<--1881-->

This Sonnet about Bacon and William Tudor is "Sealed" with 157 as the first letters, "AIATHWIALHLWST" which add up to 157 Simple cipher. The eleven is "I I", two pillars. Funny how 11 and 157 appear together so often in the Sonnets, but that's another topic for another day.  Plus the magic "Time" number 1881, if you Will, to connect past and future as one.

Well done Rob ! 👍  😃 

And thanks to the last tool you shared with us few days ago and that I am studying, one might add that the Sonnet 11 is the 144 th sonnet by counting from the end, 144 being the simple cipher of SIR FRANCIS BACON ! 😉 

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WILL TUDOR is 126 Simple and 99 Reverse cipher.

Only TWO Sonnets do not have 14 Lines, they are Sonnets 126 and 99.

Sonnet 126 with 12 Lines, first letters are "ODWTIASMYSHA" and add up to 157 Simple and 287 Kaye with 26 letter codes.

First two letters, OD, or O=14, D=4, or 14 and 4. 144 is Simple cipher for Sir Francis Bacon.

Next letters, WTI, or William Tudor I

Next letters, ASMY, or "as my"

Then, SHA, or Shakespeare

Sir Francis Bacon, William Tudor I, as my Shakespeare.

Who wrote Sonnet 126? I suspect Dee, but the sonnets reads as well if Elizabeth wrote it. Or Bacon writing to and about himself maybe, but sounds more like Dee to me. "Her Audite (though delayd) answer'd must be".

 

O Thou my louely Boy who in thy power,
Doest hould times fickle glasse,his fickle,hower:
Who hast by wayning growne,and therein shou'st,
Thy louers withering,as thy sweet selfe grow'st.
If Nature(soueraine misteres ouer wrack)
As thou goest onwards still will plucke thee backe,
She keepes thee to this purpose,that her skill.
May time disgrace,and wretched mynuit kill.
Yet feare her O thou minnion of her pleasure,
She may detaine,but not still keepe her tresure!
   Her Audite (though delayd) answer'd must be,
   And her Quietus is to render thee.

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<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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A note of the sundrie Poemes contained

If the "d" is a backwards "b" and go backwards to the "A" at the beginning back to "con" we have Bacon.

POEMES is 33 Short cipher.

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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2 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

WILL TUDOR is 126 Simple and 99 Reverse cipher.

Only TWO Sonnets do not have 14 Lines, they are Sonnets 126 and 99.

Sonnet 126 with 12 Lines, first letters are "ODWTIASMYSHA" and add up to 157 Simple and 287 Kaye with 26 letter codes.

First two letters, OD, or O=14, D=4, or 14 and 4. 144 is Simple cipher for Sir Francis Bacon.

Next letters, WTI, or William Tudor I

Next letters, ASMY, or "as my"

Then, SHA, or Shakespeare

Sir Francis Bacon, William Tudor I, as my Shakespeare.

Who wrote Sonnet 126? I suspect Dee, but the sonnets reads as well if Elizabeth wrote it. Or Bacon writing to and about himself maybe, but sounds more like Dee to me. "Her Audite (though delayd) answer'd must be".

 

O Thou my louely Boy who in thy power,
Doest hould times fickle glasse,his fickle,hower:
Who hast by wayning growne,and therein shou'st,
Thy louers withering,as thy sweet selfe grow'st.
If Nature(soueraine misteres ouer wrack)
As thou goest onwards still will plucke thee backe,
She keepes thee to this purpose,that her skill.
May time disgrace,and wretched mynuit kill.
Yet feare her O thou minnion of her pleasure,
She may detaine,but not still keepe her tresure!
   Her Audite (though delayd) answer'd must be,
   And her Quietus is to render thee.

Thank you so much Rob !!! 😃 We had already talked about the sonnet 126 in another topic, but I was not aware of the connection between WILL TUDOR and the Sonnet 99 and 126. It's awesome !

I took a look at Sonnet 99 with this new information in mind and here is what I found  ...

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Two things:

I have to try to stay on topic in threads. The past 20 years in my own head have been all about the Sonnets and the Sonnets Pyramid, so I can't help but share what I have seen in that design. So much to share. And William Tudor I is a huge part of that. But I know I tend to HOG a BACON conversation when I get excited. I promise to try to stay a little more on track.

Second, you Yann (Allisnum2ber) have offered me a new perspective, and I believe whatever skills and Bacon connections I was born with, you are the the best we have as far as what we do. In my mind I would pass that Dee Lantern to you, but in Truth you already had it and it I was merely enjoying the Light of that flame. I am so proud and happy you are looking at the tool I made in Excel. I feared I would die and nobody would be alive to pick up the pieces. Now I am happy. I plan to live a long time and contribute, but the Globe is off my self-imposed Atlas image I had of myself. LOL

I am pleased to be a part of the Allisnum2er energy and I am learning and Will continue to learn from you.

You know how many years I have studied Sonnet 11 and never saw "Herein lives Will Tudor". But I see it and it is there.

Thank you, Yann. Thank you!

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15 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Two things:

I have to try to stay on topic in threads. The past 20 years in my own head have been all about the Sonnets and the Sonnets Pyramid, so I can't help but share what I have seen in that design. So much to share. And William Tudor I is a huge part of that. But I know I tend to HOG a BACON conversation when I get excited. I promise to try to stay a little more on track.

Second, you Yann (Allisnum2ber) have offered me a new perspective, and I believe whatever skills and Bacon connections I was born with, you are the the best we have as far as what we do. In my mind I would pass that Dee Lantern to you, but in Truth you already had it and it I was merely enjoying the Light of that flame. I am so proud and happy you are looking at the tool I made in Excel. I feared I would die and nobody would be alive to pick up the pieces. Now I am happy. I plan to live a long time and contribute, but the Globe is off my self-imposed Atlas image I had of myself. LOL

I am pleased to be a part of the Allisnum2er energy and I am learning and Will continue to learn from you.

You know how many years I have studied Sonnet 11 and never saw "Herein lives Will Tudor". But I see it and it is there.

Thank you, Yann. Thank you!

Many thanks to you Rob ! Your kind words go straight to my heart 🙏.

I would say that I am pleased to be a part of the "B'hive Community" energy that exists thanks to its marvellous Janus-like Moderator 😊 .

I am learning from you too, from each and every one of your posts, as well as from those of A Phoenix, Kate , Ryan , Christina Waldman and the others.  I felt so lucky to be at your side in this adventure.

I am learning each day, and I am looking forward to discovering what I will learn from you tomorrow !

Kind regards

JOY 

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Hey Yann, funny I did not realize Sonnet 11 was 144 in Reverse. I added the extra columns in my spreadsheet when someone emailed me that Day 287 reversed was in Sonnet 33 and it blew my mind a couple years ago.

Sonnet 126? Reversed is Sonnet 29, a very important Sonnet as far as cipher numbers and very Key to the Pyramid design. That's a hint and just something to poke around. I could give clues, but the Discovery is part of connecting with Bacon. 😉

Not a quick lesson, could take weeks to see it all. I bet you will experience at least as much as I did years ago. So many levels! Invigorating beyond imagination!!

Thanks Yann!!

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Synchronicity lately has been out of this world! Something is happening here. And not only here.

May sound silly, but it is crackling and the energy is high. Bacon and Dee have been waiting for us. 😉

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Back to the topic 😉

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The 2nd inverted AA Headpiece of Hekatompathia (1582) is on page 99

99 = WILL TUDOR ( reverse cipher )

The inverted AA Headpiece invites us to turn the page upside-down.

 99 becomes 66

66 = FRA BACONI (simple cipher)

And notice the last sentence :  " And now twice free, and all my love is past "

Twice free = 2 x 33 = 66 (simple cipher)

Twice free = 2 x 111 = 222 (Kaye cipher)

And 222 is exactly the value of the AA Headpiece in Hebrew 

(The gematria of the Hebrew letter Aleph = 111 )

Nothing has been left to chance !

And you know what ?

"Twice free" is used a second time in the Sonnet LXXXIX (89) on page ... 103 !

103 = SHAKESPEARE (simple cipher)

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On page 99, are those nine 99's on the right of the page? I can't see clearly by the image.

If so, that means ten 99's on the page.

990

I I and 0

Maybe they are right quotation marks that look like 99s?

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I meant to post this earlier.

A note of the sundrie Poemes contained

The line is 32 letters. Is there a 33rd?

If the "d" is a backwards "b", then we might have 33 letters if the "d" is also a "b".

 

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14 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

On page 99, are those nine 99's on the right of the page? I can't see clearly by the image.

If so, that means ten 99's on the page.

990

I I and 0

Maybe they are right quotation marks that look like 99s?

Hi Rob, they are indeed nine quotation marks ! 🙂 

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THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN THE 1603 TRANSLATION OF CASTIGLIONE'S IL CORTEGIANO (THE COURTIER) BY SIR THOMAS HOBY. ITS TRANSLATOR SIR THOMAS HOBY WAS MARRIED TO LADY ANNE COOKE BACON'S YOUNGER SISTER ELIZABETH COOKE HOBY RUSSELL, OTHERWISE KNOWN AS LADY RUSSELL, WHO HAD A LONG AND CLOSE RELATIONSHIP WITH LORD BACON OVER THE COURSE OF A LIFETIME. THE COURTIER WAS A VERY IMPORTTANT SOURCE FOR A SUBSTANTIAL NUMBER OF LORD BACON'S SHAKESPEARE POEMS AND PLAYS INCLUDING VENUS AND ADONIS, TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA, LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOSTHENRY VMUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, MEASURE FOR MEASURE AND HAMLET.   

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The Art of English Poesie was published anonymously in 1589 printed by Richard Field the printer of Lord Bacon’s two narrative Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594). Opposite the title page is an engraving of Lord Bacon’s royal mother Queen Elizabeth. A Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece stands above the dedication ostensibly written by Richard Field to Lord Bacon’s nominal uncle Sir William Cecil, Queen Elizabeth’s senior statesman, married to Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil, elder sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon. The anonymous authorship of the work is wrongly attributed to George Puttenham.

This work written by Lord Bacon is universally agreed to be the most systematic and comprehensive work on the subject of poets and the nature of poetry then ever written. In the work FB states that poets (of course himself included) have written poetry which was published anonymously or without their own names to it:

'Now alfo of fuch among the Nobilitie or gentrie as be very well feene in many laudable sciences, and especially in making or Poesie, it is so come to passe that they haue no courage to write and if they haue, yet are they loath to be a knowen of their skill. So as I know very many notable Gentlemen in the Court that haue written commendably and fuppreffed it agayne, or els suffred it to be publisht without their owne names to it'

[Francis Bacon, The Arte of English Posie (London: printed by Richard Field, 1589), Book 1, p. 37]

For the most extensive discussion of Lord Bacons authorship of The Arte of English Posie see Walter Begley, Bacons Nova Resuscitatio or The Unveiling of his Concealed Works and Travels (London: Gay and Bird, 1905), I, pp. 1-80.

For a detailed discussion of the extensive influence of the work throughout the Shakespeare canon see William Lowes Rushton, Shakespeare and The Arte of English Poesie’ (Liverpool: Henry Young and Sons, 1908).

See also: https://sirbacon.org/anonymous.htm

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There are an enormous number of correspondences, resemblances and parallels between the 'Marlowe' works and the 'Shake-speare' poems and plays which has led the Marlovians (even though he died in 1593!) to suggest that Marlowe was the secret author of the Shakespeare canon. Oh Lord Such Fools these Mortals Be. At least they were right in one sense: the 'Marlowe' and 'Shakespeare' works most certainly share the same author, Francis Bacon.

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THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN ARGENIS A WORK WHICH SECRETLY DISCLOSES THE LOVE AFFAIR BETWEEN A YOUNG FRANCIS BACON AND MARGUERITE DE VALOIS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND ROMEO AND JULIET THE MOST FAMOUS PLAY ABOUT LOVE IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD. 

The love affair between Lord Bacon and Marguerite de Valois while he was in France (1576-79) features heavily in the multi-volume Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher Story by Orville W. Owen and the multi-volume The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon by Elizabeth Wells Gallup. The story of their love affair is also obliquely alluded to in the Argenis credited to John Barclay.
 
The Argenis was first published in Latin at Paris in 1621. The first English edition said to be by Kingsmill Long appeared in London in 1625. A second English translation credited to Sir Robert le Grys and Thomas May was published in 1629 this time with a key to explain the true identity of those persons written about in the work under feigned names and a third edition again said to be by Kingsmill Long in 1636 with pictures and also a key with which to further unlock the story.
 
In this very curious work Argenis is the daughter of the King of France and wife to Poliarchus (Henry Navarre, afterwards Henry IV of France), i.e., Marguerite de Valois, Hyanisbe is Queen Elizabeth, who had a son named Hiempsall who was known abroad as Archombrotus, i. e., Lord Bacon, who has a love affair with Queen Marguerite.
 
The Argenis is discussed at some length by Granville C. Cunningham in Bacon's Secret Disclosed in Contemporary Books (London: Gay & Hancock, 1911), pp. 128-65 as well as in a number of articles by various authors in Baconiana, see A. M. Challinor, An Index to Baconiana (The Francis Bacon Society, 2001), p. 84.
 
The love affair between Lord Bacon and Queen Marguerite is reflected in Romeo and Juliet and Troilus and Cressida as well as in a number of his Shakespeare sonnets. 
 

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THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN THE 1590 EDITION OF ARCADIA WRITTEN IN THE NAME OF LORD BACON'S LITERARY MASK SIR PHILIP SIDNEY.

For those interested in reading a discussion of FB's authorship of letters and writings presented in the name of Sir Philip Sidney see Edward George Harman, Edmund Spenser and the Impersonations of Francis Bacon (London: Constable and Company 1914), pp. 185-200. 

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THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE ON THE TITLE PAGE OF TAMBURLAINE THE GREAT ATTRIBUTED TO LORD BACON'S LITERARY MASK CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE AND THE FIRST PAGE OF THE TEXT WITH HIS MONOGRAM IN THE FORM OF THE TWO VERY LARGE CAPITAL LETTERS F AND B AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST TWO VERSES SIMILAR TO THE DEVICES USED BY HIM IN THE RAPE OF LUCRECE, THE SHAKESPEARE SONNETS AND A LOVER'S COMPLAINT.

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE ON THE TITLE PAGE OF TAMBURLAINE THE GREAT ATTRIBUTED TO LORD BACON'S LITERARY MASK CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE AND THE FIRST PAGE OF THE TEXT WITH HIS MONOGRAM IN THE FORM OF THE TWO VERY LARGE CAPITAL LETTERS F AND B AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST TWO VERSES SIMILAR TO THE DEVICES USED BY HIM IN THE RAPE OF LUCRECE, THE SHAKESPEARE SONNETS AND A LOVER'S COMPLAINT.

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WHO ? I would say the Greate FRANCIS BACON or FRA BACON, who by his rare and wonderfull "Quests",

became a most puissant and mighty Monarque. 😊

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Posted (edited)

WE KNOW FROM SPEDDING (WORKS, VI, pp. 351-64) THAT LORD BACON AND HIS FELLOW ROSICRUCIAN BROTHER WILLIAM CAMDEN WORKED CLOSELY TOGETHER ON HIS ANNALS OF QUEEN ELIZABETH IN WHICH PASSAGES BY FB WERE INSERTED INTO IT. THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE APPEARS ON SEVERAL OCCASIONS IN THE 1614 EDITION OF REMAINES CONCERNING BRITAINE. ONE OF THESE AA HEADPIECES IS PRINTED UPSIDE DOWN INDICATING TO THE INITIATED THAT SECRET INFORMATION ABOUT LORD BACON IS HEREIN DISCLOSED.  ON THIS PAGE IT IS WRITTEN 'AT THE TIME ROMULUS TOOKE THE SABINE NAMES OF QUIRINUS, BECAUSE HE USED TO CARRY A SPEARE, WHICH THE SABINES CALLED 'QUIRIS.' IF WE TAKE THE FIRST TWO LETTERS OF 'OF', THE LAST THREE LETTERS OF 'QUIRINUS' AND THE FIRST FOUR LETTERS FROM 'BECAUSE' IT YIELDS AN ANAGRAM OF F BEACONUS (IN ELIZABETHAN TIMES BEACON WAS USED FOR BACON) OR IF WE DROP THE 'E' IT YIELDS F BACONUS THE LATIN FOR F BACON. THUS CAMDEN IS HERE ASSOCIATING BACON WITH QUIRINUS THE SPEARMAN AN ALLUSION TO SHAKESPEARE. IN ONE OF THE VERSES IN THE MEMORIAE WHERE LORD BACON IS PRESENTED AS A SUPREME POET AND THE WRITER OF COMEDIES AND TRAGEDIES THE POET AND DRAMATIST THOMAS RANDOLPH USED THE TERM 'QUIRINUS' THE SPEARMAN, i.e., SHAKESPEARE WHEN DESCRIBING LORD BACON AS A DIVINE MINERVA [PALLAS ATHENA THE SHAKER OF THE SPEAR]: 

When he perceived that the arts were held by no roots, and like seed scattered on the surface of the soil were withering away, he taught the Pegesean arts to grow, as grew the spear of Quirinus [Spear/Spearman: i.e., Shakespeare] swiftly into a laurel tree. Therefore since he has taught the Heliconian goddesses to flourish no lapse of ages shall dim his glory. The ardour of his noble heart could bear no longer that you, divine Minerva [Pallas Athena the Shaker of the Spear who wore a helmet which rendered her invisible] should be despised. His godlike pen restored your wonted honour and as another Apollo [leader of the Nine Muses presiding over the different kinds of poetry and liberal arts] dispelled the clouds that hid you.

[William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626), pp. 27-30; W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), pp. 46-7]

 

 

 

 

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Examples of the Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece also appear in the 1625 edition of the Annales The True History of the famous Empresse Elizabeth Queene of England, France and Ireland. Its remarkable and very elaborate symbolic title page is headed by the Phoenix used to describe Queen Elizabeth by Lord Bacon in the famous Cranmer speech towards the close of his Shakespeare play Henry VIII first published two years earlier in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. 

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9 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Examples of the Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece also appear in the 1625 edition of the Annales The True History of the famous Empresse Elizabeth Queene of England, France and Ireland. Its remarkable and very elaborate symbolic title page is headed by the Phoenix used to describe Queen Elizabeth by Lord Bacon in the famous Cranmer speech towards the close of his Shakespeare play Henry VIII first published two years earlier in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. 

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Hi A Phoenix. This is the very first time that I have seen this Title Page ! Indeed, it is remarkable ! 😮❤️ Thank you for sharing.

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On 3/26/2022 at 5:12 PM, Allisnum2er said:

Hi A Phoenix,

Thank you again for sharing this with us.

I do not know if someone already noticed it and if it is important, but the  letter "w" of  "worth", "wit", "within" and "dwell" is the same that the one used in the passage engraved on the scroll of Shakespeare's Monument.

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I did a tweet about this 2 days ago as I thought it was such an incredible observation as the book with the frontispiece first showing the strange W is from 1656 and the monument which also shows it wasn’t erected until 1740/41.
 

I credited Yann in my post, but as he is not often on Twitter I DM’d him to tell him. Through some incredible synchronicity, in the interim Yann had been looking at the Weever book I had posted and seen it in there too!

It must mean something as Weevers book on Funeral Monuments was 1631.  So that’s 1631, 1656 and 1740/1

This very, very strange way of writing the letter W would surely not have persisted for so many years unless it is a ‘secret’ Rosicrucian/Masonic cipher  or clue to alert attention. Amazing powers of observation, Yann!

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