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The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA Headpieces in Editions of Shakespeare Poems, Quartos & Folios


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Thank you again for sharing, A. Phoenix !

This is the very first time that I see the Title Page of the 1594 edition of "The Taming of the the Shrew".

And I am really sorry but, you know, I see codes everyhere ! 

This is just an idea but, maybe that the name of Shake-speare does not appear on this Title Page because the play is the fruit of "The Pleasant Harp of Bacon", our Apollo ?

 

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Hi Yann, 

Brilliant spot. Until you pointed it out, this had for us, passed under the radar. It is, of course, reminiscent of the BACON on the title page of the 1597 quarto edition of Richard II.  As far as we are aware you are the first to notice this. Another WORLD FIRST to add to your already growing list. Thank you.

 

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THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN THE 1609 EDITION OF SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS UNDERNEATH WHICH THE FIRST SONNET BEGINS WITH A LARGE CAPITAL F AND CAPITAL R [AND FOLLOWING THE INDENTATION] A CAPITAL B THUS WE HAVE THE INITIALS FOR FR [ANCIS] B [ACON] THE SAME SECRET SIGNATURE WHICH COMMENCES THE FIRST STANZA IN THE RAPE OF LUCRECE.

Sonnets.png

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So as stunning synchronicity would have it I’ve been pondering all week as to why the front page is centered but the dedication page is so far to the left? Then I log in here and see this...

DE9EDC4D-4565-40BD-ACFC-51CBAF0E75E5.thumb.png.c17918bb9e7b7f2c55635d696d621a2b.png
 

Here’s what I had come up with and been playing with in the week0A8A6212-53DA-47E4-BB24-26E1C0AF9D21.jpeg.2ae851a27419b6a8d85298a43674f7fe.jpeg

I sent this exact image to someone on Wednesday! 

The front page appears positioned according to divine proportion. The image on the right just needs to be properly overlaid but I can’t find a way to do it exactly (i.e., in exact divine proportion). If it turns out that the parallel lines align with the front page lines (and the small circle is perhaps over the O in Somnets) then I’m on to something and it may be that the same proportions overlaid onto the dedication  page demarcate lines of code.

Not sure about the other pages 

Anyway, here’s another version of it 
 

3604C9E3-273E-44F6-8FF1-3306D3351E71.jpeg.e17a15a7b33272a1088ea9b77b2f9602.jpeg

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Hi Kate, this is certainly not common knowledge and opens up a very curious and interesting line of inquiry already taken up by Rob and I am sure Yann will have something to say and offer about all the posts on the Sonnets and their potential links to other areas and disciplines. 

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7 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Kate, this is certainly not common knowledge and opens up a very curious and interesting line of inquiry already taken up by Rob and I am sure Yann will have something to say and offer about all the posts on the Sonnets and their potential links to other areas and disciplines. 

Here’s some more  grabbed from Google - some are licensable so just showing for generating further ideas. This is exactly the kind of thing Dee would have been working with.   Kate8A789B1C-072E-4D62-A27C-6B5E0E409AD1.jpeg.e80d446e75994f2c45f5daedda5001b6.jpegEFBCA1B1-B73F-4E87-90BA-72C25EF7654A.jpeg.dc85f50e862a9ee7ddaecb9630c6051b.jpeg

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I found a very crude way to do it on my phone. I think to know exactly which letters may be being highlighted, or isolated, one would have to know the exact proportions of the page but here’s some more to generate lightbulb moments!  The second puts the circle over the O in Sonnets and does result in a near perfect match of the parallel lines on the front page.

 

Has anyone ever noticed that ake on is near sounding to Bake on (Bacon)! Just a coincidence in this case I think.E63DD1D7-803E-467F-9862-5D87E04A17E0.jpeg.2c86f1a7cc1afb2259ad8cf2cedaa13f.jpegD18CDDB8-49A5-43E1-A5E7-44FD81A4343D.jpeg.ed0fe1fc1f2909983de89115b5c94c46.jpeg

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6 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Here is something I worked on yesterday night , and that I planned to post this morning.  it seems that you have been quicker than me ! 😄

image.thumb.png.c06970a86f3396df564b6338c6443564.png

By the way, on the left we can see that the diagonal is passing through the letters H,O, and D and HOD is the Hebrew word for GLORY

 

Edited by Allisnum2er
Sorry, I missed the "b" of "Before"
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This is just an idea , something it could be interesting to work with ...

Golden.JPG.9c56c51ccc25a10365dc6c03c370793d.JPG

 

I love the kind of "Vitruvian man" inside the Heart ! 🙂 

Notice that he is on the TOP of the Great Pyramid, above kind of a Vescica Pisces  and he seems to look  into the sky, the inverted Pyramid !        

Edited by Allisnum2er
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It’s a fascinating thing to play around with. I could do this for hours! Look at this one. The line through the word Sonnets is astounding as it exactly aligns with the cross bar in the E and underlines Shakespeare. I “constrained” the grid in settings so presumably this does show the proper proportions. K43CD7766-410D-45B3-95BF-846A4F221F93.jpeg.b23c3c2c316911be781f2a9e727b48d0.jpeg

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26 minutes ago, Kate Cassidy said:

Is it documented anywhere what the exact measurement of the pages are? Like we have A4 and A5, was there a size? Does anyone know? Thank you

 

I have "The English replicas" facsimile and the measurement of the pages is 22x16 cm.

But the Sonnets were first printed in 1609 in a quarto volume that means approximately 10 inches (250 mm) tall by 8 inches (200 mm) wide.

Here is an interesting site about "sizing Shake-speare's Sonnets":

https://collation.folger.edu/2020/01/sizing-shakespeares-sonnets/


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As it’s Sunday and everyone reads the Shakespeare Sunday hashtag, I’ve just asked the question on Twitter, as someone may be reading who knows the measurement of the original copy. I have a very low number of followers on that account so if anyone reading could RT  (the feed is @TheSecretWork) then maybe we can get more eyes on it and obtain an answer - even if from the Oxfordians or Stratfordians! Thank you 

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14 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

 

I have "The English replicas" facsimile and the measurement of the pages is 22x16 cm.

But the Sonnets were first printed in 1609 in a quarto volume that means approximately 10 inches (250 mm) tall by 8 inches (200 mm) wide.

Here is an interesting site about "sizing Shake-speare's Sonnets":

https://collation.folger.edu/2020/01/sizing-shakespeares-sonnets/

 

What an amazing article. Thank you so much and the footnote links are fascinating too. 🙏

https://www.folger.edu/shakespeare/first-folio/diy-first-folio?_ga=2.219015898.212856757.1646568461-1319687977.1646568461

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TO, Begin, I can say with A lot of CONfidence that printers, engravers, and architects for centuries have used geometry along with rulers, squares, compasses, and other tools to create perfectly arranged works. Today we have PhotoShop, Illustrator, and other high-end software to help, but we use the same techniques that the ancients used.

When I was in school it was drilled into us that every graphic design needs to be mathematically perfect. Every line, the placement of every word, letter, visual element, everything including blank spaces needs to be just right. When a design is perfect, there is beauty that the viewer experiences. They don't even know why it is perfect, but it is easy on the eye and makes one feel good. They should feel Love. A sloppy or amateur design, even though the viewer does not why, they feel uncomfortable and perhaps even angry on some level. 

The Sonnets designs were on purpose, whatever formulas they used. We can just know they measured and calculated every letter and element.

It is possible they used this divine proportion as it was around and I am sure they knew about it. They also had a wealth of other mathematical formulas in their tool box to use.  Same today as it was 400 years ago.

Scaled so the lines match up using the O in Sonnets as a starting point, as already presented above:

image.thumb.png.7625165f06cb86aa658aa429ff8446f9.png

Oh, my first line? Just for fun. You do know TO is 33 Simple cipher, right?

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Quote

It’s a fascinating thing to play around with. I could do this for hours!

I spent some time last night and since I woke up this morning playing with it as well. I've been putting it over some Bacon frontpieces, etc. with interesting results.

On the Sonnets page, to get the lines to match, the length is off. So as a graphic designer, it is not perfect. But still very cool and may have been used. If the lines were the correct length, it would be more convincing to me.

I like the way it fits on the Bacon frontpiece engraving below, but I can't say it is perfect. 😉

But a lot of the lines to match up, and there is an eye in one of the small circles.

image.thumb.png.3b1979e4701a3467f86bf467ff623d03.png

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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