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The Droeshout Portrait : a new discovery ?


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AWESOME !!!

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A02367.0001.001/1:11?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

This book was written by ADAMS THOMAS who was called the SHAKESPEARE OF THE PURITANS !!!

I agree, it was by the english poet Robert Southey (1774 - 1883) but it remains a good omen ! 😄

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Adams_(priest)

Moreover "he was on intimate terms with William Herbert, 3rd Earl of Pembroke ".

https://sirbacon.org/mcompeer3of3.htm

And here is a link to the work of Mather Walker, explaining that

Thomas Adams would be one of the masks of ...  Francis Bacon !

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Here is a last suggestion ...

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A02367.0001.001/1:5.13?rgn=div2;view=fulltext

In the Book, there is a page dedicated to ...

   Wisdome !

A man may be deuoute enough: too much, when
their zeale is like the horne in the Vnicorns head: it doth
more hurt then good. You would not haue wished
Baal Priests doe more for their Maister: loe, the gashes
and mouthes of their selfe-giuen wounds, speake their
forwardnesse: they wanted a Lampe of direction, to
Guide it to Gods Altar.

Aristotl• e•lls Discretion,*virtutum normam et form•m:
the eye of the soule, the soule of vertue. I would to God,
some amongst vs had one Dramme of this grace, ming∣led
with their whole handfuls of zeale. It would a little
Coole the preter naturall heate of the slng-brand fraternitie;
as one wittily calleth them.

Hollerius writes of an Italian, that by often smelling to
the herbe Basil, had Scorpions bred in his braine. Proud
Faction is the weed they so much smell on, and make
poesies of, that the serpents bred in their braines, doe
stinge and wound the bosome of the Church. These
Binde, and with Cordes, but not to the Altar, Deuotion is
not their scope, but distraction. O may the spirit of
meeknesse Binde their Sacrifice to the Altar: direct their
zeale with Discretion, to the glory of God. And let vs
euery one say resolutely with Daui•: I will wa•h my hands
in innocencie,*O Lord; and so will I compasse thine Altar. Wise∣dome
is a faire Daughter in this Progenie. Bind the Sa∣crifice
with Cords to the Altar.

F.BAC.

I have not found a facsimile.

Thus, I do not know if we have the same arrangement and the same Capital letters in the Book.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basil

Basil, the "Royal" herb.

And could Hollerius be our Doctor Panurgus, or "Le Medicin Guarissant" ?

https://dental.nyu.edu/aboutus/rare-book-collection/16-c/jacques-houllier.html

https://data.bnf.fr/13484964/jacques_houllier/

 

 

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9 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Emblemata_Saecularia_(1596)#

800px-De_narrendokter_ARTE_MEA_CEREBRUM_NISI_SIT_SAPIENTIATOTUM_%28titel_op_object%29_Emblemata_Saecularia%2C_1596_%28serietitel%29%2C_RP-P-BI-5230.jpg

Emblemata Saecularia - Planche  44

ARTE MEA CEREBRUM NISI SIT SAPIENTIATOTUM

"By my art everyone's brain becomes wisdom"

All these engravings share something very powerful from long ago. The "smoke" to me could be hallucinations and visions. I'm very curious what the ingredients were that cleansed a body of basically everything and released the mind's "follies" and "fantasies". 😉

 

Wisdom of the Purge, Part I

https://ayahuascawisdom.com/wisdom-of-the-purge-part-i/

La Purga, “The Purge,” is one of ayahuasca’s names in the Amazon, highlighting a most notorious aspect of its reputation. The ayahuasca vine is strongly purgative—indigenous people sometimes drink it simply to induce a good cleanse. The bucket is thus an essential element in most ayahuasca ceremonies, unless you are free to vomit on the ground. In this “Ode to the Bucket,” I will explore some legendary aspects of the purge.

EDIT:

Brushing up a little on South America ethnobotany and read that Spain was established in Peru in the early 16th century collecting plants and drugs. In Europe some of these plants ended up in gardens. So the "Two drugges" in the DOCT PANRVGUS Droeshout engraving could possibly be the two plants needed to make Ayahuasca. Don't forget that Dr. Dee's famous scribing mirror was from South America, so cool things did get passed around a bit from Spanish South American connections.

Maybe Bacon was growing the two plants in his garden!

Regardless, of all the plants, powders, and potions of the Elizabethan times that Doctors would use to cure whatever, an Ayahuasca mix would be one of the most powerful inDeed and well worthy of an interesting engraving. 🙂

 

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The name Panurgus is a reference to Panurge in Pantagruel by Francois Rabelais.

Chapter 33 of Pantagruel translated  by Thomas Urquhart and Peter Antony Motteux

How Pantagruel became sick, and the manner how he was recovered -

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Pantagruel/Chapter_XXXIII

And in Chapter 30

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Pantagruel/Chapter_XXX

 "Pantagruel withdrew himself to the place of the flagons, and called for Panurge and the rest"

We have a list of famous individuals.

The 26th one is ... Scipio Africanus !!!

For me, this says it all ! 😊

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Urquhart

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Pantagruel

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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

The name Panurgus is a reference to Panurge in Pantagruel by Francois Rabelais.

It may also be a play on the word "Purge" (Panurgus/Purge) which is depicted as the theme.

The article Kate posted states:

The composition derives from a print engraved by Matthaus Greuter, probably c.1600 (itself deriving from one of the emblems in the de Brys' hugely influential Emblemata Saecularia of 1596), which was issued in French/German and German-only editions, the former bearing the title Le medecin guarissant Phantasie Purgeant aussi Par drogues la folie [The doctor curing fantasies, and also purging folly with drugs]. But Droeshout made significant changes to his model, dropping the doctor's assistant, adding a richly-dressed couple, an inset panel in which two pluralists confront each other weighed down by the churches on their shoulders, and a great deal of explanatory text in the form of labels within the image-frame.

Naming the wonder-working doctor Panurgus seems to have been Droeshout's innovation. Why? It is unlikely Droeshout had read Rabelais – most English intellectuals knew only the French author's name, which they used, like those of Aretino and Macchiavelli, merely as a hate-word. Panourgia is a medical term, and Galen uses it for 'adulterated or false drugs', and although the etymological sense of the name is neutrally 'all-work', later English usage similarly tended to interpret the term pejoratively as 'ready to do any work', i.e. including illegal things, as a criminal would be. Notwithstanding this, however, there is no doubt that in our print Dr. Panurgus is a positive figure, able to cure his patients, who come from all ranks of society - as the verses and the figures themselves make clear – of their manifold follies. Significantly, for dating purposes, the Latinate form of the name – which by itself suggests independence of Rabelais' creation - is known to have been used by two English writers in 1619 and 1623 only, and perhaps strengthens the case for an origin in the 1620s.[3]

Footnote:

[3]. Just about everything known about Rabelais 'reception' at this period will be found in A.L. Prescott, Imagining Rabelais in Renaissance England (New Haven, 1998), especially pp. 86-102, 'Quicksilver Interlude: Panurge and Panourgia in England', though Droeshout's use of the name is missed.

OK, bring in Bacon. He would have likely known about Rabelais' works from his time in France. A. Phoenix's discovery connecting Bacon to Droeshout is supported above. The engraving contains a lot of imagery and symbolism, yet I still feel like the main purpose is to show the ultimate Shamanic "purge" experience whether it is a South American brew or derived from somewhere else.

Look at what the patient is pooping!

The Doctor is currently pouring a dose labelled Wisdome and Understanding down the throat of a rude Rusticall who sits on a close-stool and through whom passe various animals and birds, including an ass, which is being milked by a man (in the German original only three little fools are excreted).

From Wisdom of the Purge, Part II:

https://ayahuascawisdom.com/wisdom-of-the-purge-part-ii/

What’s In That Bucket, Anyway?

Then there’s the matter of what ends up in the bucket—sometimes strange things that appear to be completely unrelated to the food consumed that day. People have reported seeing dark shapes, entities, reptilian beings, slugs, malevolent eyes, or just a sense of horrible dark energy.

So if Bacon did make suggestions and guide Dreoshout in content to be included, then Bacon obviously came up with the name DOCT PANVRGVS. But why this particular image of a healing and perhaps life changing Purge?

I think if Bacon did not go through the experience, he certainly may have witnessed it first hand. By the time Rabelais wrote the tales of Panurge and Pantagruel, being a Dr himself, rumors and stories of the Amazon purge would have been starting to circulate among some in Europe who have interest in medicine. And perhaps a few jugs of "La Purga" were being tested as well.

Just trying to get into Bacon's mind. 🙂

 

 

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Good old chat GPT

Yes, the term "Panurgus" can refer to something else besides the specific context you mentioned. In biology, "Panurgus" is the genus name for a group of bees in the family Andrenidae. These bees are commonly known as the polyester bees or the oil-collecting bees.

Beehive!

Maybe a link to Johannes Valentinus Andreae? *

* Hmm maybe maybe not. I prodded further as the Bee genus was only introduced in 1831 and Chat GPT said:

Since "Panurgus" as a bee genus did not exist before that time, any symbolic associations or hidden meanings related to bees and their characteristics would not be relevant to a hypothetical use of the name "Panurgus" prior to its taxonomic introduction.

It's important to keep in mind that if we are discussing a hypothetical cryptic use of the name "Panurgus" in the 1600s, the associations and symbolism would depend on the intended meaning or code used within that specific context, rather than being directly linked to the characteristics of the bee genus introduced later.

Needs more research

Also saw this in a John Dee book. https://archive.org/details/themagicsealofdr.johndee.thesigillumdeiaemethbycolind.campbell/mode/1up?view=theater

A square is obviously a common symbol so there may be no  connection whatsoever to Dee's protective seal.

 

 

DeePanurgus.png.3d6ab12d88c0d2841d464ce51cf4e313.png

Edited by Kate
To add new ChatGPT info
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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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ChatGPT on furnaces:

In both Mystic Christianity and Rosicrucianism, furnaces can hold symbolic significance. Here is some information on their potential symbolism in these traditions:

Mystic Christianity: In Christian mysticism, furnaces are often associated with the concept of purification and transformation. The imagery of a furnace represents the spiritual process of purging and refining the soul, burning away impurities and worldly attachments. It is akin to the metaphorical "fire" of divine love that consumes and transforms the individual, leading to spiritual growth and union with God.

The furnace can also symbolize the trials and challenges one encounters on the spiritual path. Just as gold is purified in fire, the individual undergoes spiritual trials and tests that refine their character and strengthen their faith.

Rosicrucianism: Rosicrucianism is a mystical and esoteric tradition associated with the concept of alchemy, spiritual transformation, and inner illumination. In this context, the furnace is often linked to the alchemical process of transmutation. It represents the alchemical vessel, known as the "athanor" or "alchemical furnace," where the transformation of base metals into gold takes place.

The furnace symbolizes the inner alchemical laboratory within the practitioner, where the transformation of the self occurs. It signifies the intense inner work, purification, and transformation of the individual's psyche and spirit. The alchemical furnace is seen as a metaphorical crucible, where the practitioner undergoes a process of inner purification and refinement to attain spiritual enlightenment and union with the divine.

Overall, in both Mystic Christianity and Rosicrucianism, the symbolism of furnaces is closely tied to the themes of purification, transformation, and spiritual growth. It represents the inner process of refining the soul, letting go of impurities, and experiencing a spiritual rebirth or illumination.

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What about Panurgus, King of Oceana (who refers to Henry VIII)?

James was Alma; Hampton Court, Convallium; Windsor, Mount Celia. By Hemisna, Harrington meant the river Trent. Past sovereigns of England he renamed for Oceana: William the Conqueror became Turbo; King John, Adoxus; Richard II, Dicotome; Henry VII, Panurgus; Henry VIII, Coraunus; Elizabeth, Parthenia; James I, Morpheus. He referred to Hobbes as Leviathan; and to Francis Bacon, as Verulamius.

...

In which words Verulamius, as Machiavel has done before him, harps much upon a string which he has not perfectly tuned, and that is, the balance of dominion or property, as it follows more plainly, in his praise "of the profound and admirable device of Panurgus, King of Oceana, in making farms and houses of husbandry of a standard; that is, maintained with such a proportion of land to them as may breed a subject to live in convenient plenty, and no servile condition, and to keep the plough in the hands of the owners, and not mere hirelings.

James Harrington - The Commonwealth of Oceana

 

EDIT: The Commonwealth of Oceana

https://ia801600.us.archive.org/9/items/commonwealthofoc00harr/commonwealthofoc00harr.pdf

 

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Synchronicity last night as I was typing about the Wisdom of the Purge, my wife was watching an old Seinfeld episode and him and George Costanza were talking about that Jerry always vomits on June 29th. I heard that in the background as I was thinking about and typing a purge post here. Today is June 29 and purging is still a theme. 🙂

And more on the Purge theme:

Regurgitating Nature: On the Celebrated Anecdote by Karel van Mander about Pieter Bruegel the Elder

https://jhna.org/articles/regurgitating-nature-celebrated-anecdote-by-karel-van-mander-about-pieter-bruegel-the-elder/

image.png.0d4fca55a4615a9c27b8325450cb45e9.png

Fig. 7 Pieter van der Heyden, after Pieter Bruegel, published by Hieronymus Cock, The Temptation of Saint Anthony, 1556, engraving, 24.4 x 32.6 cm. British Museum, London, inv. no. 1866.0407.10 (artwork in the public domain; photo: Trustees of the British Museum)


https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/383057


A clip from the end of the essay:

Epilogue: Doctor Rabelais and the Mind-Body Dialectic

From a more general cultural standpoint, the central importance of the digestive metaphor in Bruegel’s and van Mander’s day (and Seneca’s, long before)85 is directly linked to medical knowledge and, more specifically, to the theory of the humors, according to which the body and spirit or disposition are governed by the same qualities (hot, cold, dry, wet) and elements (earth, air, fire, water). For example, melancholy—diagnosed as an excess of black bile—could be caused by “poorly digested” images.86 An engraving by Matthaus Greuter, republished several times, is described as showing “a doctor [purging] a melancholic by causing him to defecate his images” (fig. 12).87 The idea seems to have been current before the Renaissance: the Expositio prosae de Angelis, by the twelfth-century writer Alain de Lille explains that “images are defecated by the mind.”88

Matthias Greuter,  Le médecin guarissant Phantasie purgeant aussi , ca. 1600, Wellcome collection, London

Fig. 12 Matthias Greuter, Le médecin guarissant Phantasie purgeant aussi par drogues la folie, ca. 1600, engraving. Wellcome collection, London (artwork in the public domain; photo: wikimedia commons) [side-by-side viewer]

These scatological metaphors refer to actual therapeutic practices of the time, based on the use and abuse of intestinal purges and forced vomiting, in order to free the mind or spirit. Galen of Pergamon and Hippocrates were the sources for the practice, cited in numerous medical texts. The virtues of vomiting are celebrated in Aldobrandino of Siena’s Régime du corps (Regimen of the body, 1256), which also notes the best times of year for bleeding and intestinal purges. An entire chapter is devoted to purges, followed by another on vomiting: “Par coi il fait bon user le vomir”—advice doubtless followed by Rabelais for the healing of his invalid Pantagruel.89 A later English version of Greuter’s image in the British Museum depicts this medical world (fig. 13). The toilet chair is reserved for a peasant figure (a rude Rusticall), while a young courtier and clerics receive other treatments for the expurgation of corrupting images from their minds. Here, the association of the peasant figure with scatology echoes the Bruegelian strategy highlighted by van Mander in his biography: the peasant regurgitates or defecates his images. Dated circa 1600, the engraving’s first edition is derived from an emblem in Theodor de Bry’s Emblemata Saecularia of 1597, a work that borrows several figures of drunken peasants from compositions by Karel van Mander.90 Interestingly, in Martin Droeshout’s version of the print (circa 1620–30), the doctor is renamed Panurgus, indicating a close kinship with the world of Rabelais.91

Martin Droeshout,  To This Grave Doctor Millions Do Resort, ca. 1620–30, British Museum, London

Fig. 13 Martin Droeshout, To This Grave Doctor Millions Do Resort, ca. 1620–30, etching, 34.8 x 40.8 cm. British Museum, London, inv. no. 1854.1113.154 (artwork in the public domain; photo: Trustees of the British Museum) [side-by-side viewer]

The conjunction of medical science, food or nourishment, obscenity, imitation, and satire is indeed (especially) dense in Rabelais,92 himself a doctor, whose writings were often justly compared to Bruegel’s paintings. The rapprochement has a long history. In 1565, a collection of engravings entitled Les songes drolatiques de Pantagruel includes six plates directly inspired by characters and motifs from the series of Vices published by Hieronymus Cock in 1558.93 In Rabelais, as in Bruegel, the representation of imitatio as digestio is more than a straightforward scholarly reference disguised in burlesque tones. It affirms the central importance of the body in the construction and perception of the text or image. Michel Jeanneret’s comments on Rabelais’s assimilation of imitation and digestion are worth noting if we are to understand the paradoxical hermeneutics in Bruegel, as articulated by van Mander:

It would be wrong—he writes—to take this bibliophagy lightly and to neutralize its power by shelving it as cliché and rhetoric. The comic surface belies a profound reflection on the status of literature in the experience of everyday life. We understand it better in its cultural context. The oral tradition, or what remains of it when our mentalities and mores are dominated by print; the written document is rarely dissociated from its enunciation in the spoken word. In such circumstances, the word is perceived as an audible presence, an articulation, an accentuation, the sender’s physical engagement in his message. The text is addressed not only to the intellect; it is a global event that demands the participation of body and mind alike. Communication is perceived as a series of concrete impulses and abstract significations alike, an aspect of organic life impacting the whole person. And the same is true of knowledge, which remains associated with an act of sensory apprehension. To acquire learning is to transport a tangible object from the outer to the inner world.94

Like Bruegel’s oeuvre, Rabelais’s writing perfectly encapsulates this dialectic of the internal and external, inner and outer, essence and appearance. As such, it constitutes—with the writings of other humanists like Erasmus—a crucial source for our understanding of the driving forces behind Bruegel’s art. As Bakhtine has clearly shown, defecation is a powerful metaphor for birth and rebirth, creation and intellectual creativity, especially in Gargantua—remember, for example, the episode of Gargamelle giving birth, or the infant Gargantua hunting for the best arse-wipe.95 Similarly, in Bruegel’s Magpie on the Gallows, the opposition between the kakker in the foreground—like so many figures of draftsmen in landscape paintings—and the splendid natural panorama establishes a pictorial tension that invites us to read beyond our initial apprehension of the grotesque, ludicrous detail (see fig. 6). Just as van Mander establishes a paradoxical link between Bruegel’s regurgitation and the “intelligent” imitation of nature, so Bruegel himself juxtaposes an ideal landscape and a figure attending to the basest of human needs, inviting us to read the composition on a number of levels. Voltaire shows a clear understanding of this “Silenic” aesthetic when he writes, in Rabelais’s own voice: “I took my compatriots at their weakest point; I spoke of drinking, I talked filth, and with that secret, I was afforded every liberty. High-minded people heard finesse, and were grateful to me; coarse folk saw only filth, and relished it: far from suffering persecution, I was loved by all.”96

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

PANURGUS=BACON

                  The name Panurgus may have been selected by the Great One because it produces a count in simple cipher of 111 Bacon in kay cipher. 

PAN.png

DOCTOR PANURGUS is 182 Simple cipher.

image.png.46db5aa7ac4dac3b60fea28017e0cef6.png

ONE EIGHTY TWO is 157 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher.

image.png.7afa9003c3dd1de7173b007dc80167fa.png

So DOCTOR PANURGUS in a way is the same as FRA ROSIE CROSSE.

image.png.b69052aa76a779a19dc8d3580579acfd.png

I think you knew I would bring this up A. Phoenix, but I was waiting for your prompt! 🙂

I am still fascinated by this Purge concept. It is soooooo important!

Bacon: Hey Martin, I'd love to have you do a custom engraving for me.

Martin: I'd be honored. What do you have in mind?

Bacon: How about a recreation of the famous Purge engraving with creatures being pooped out and fun follies in the smoke of the furnace?

Martin: Can I engrave you in as well?

Bacon: Sure, but make me younger, PLEASE!

Panurgus? I see "Purge" and "Pan". Does Bacon intend we think he will "Purge Pan" of bad energy and folly?

 

 

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3 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

DOCTOR PANURGUS is 182 Simple cipher.

image.png.46db5aa7ac4dac3b60fea28017e0cef6.png

ONE EIGHTY TWO is 157 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher.

image.png.7afa9003c3dd1de7173b007dc80167fa.png

So DOCTOR PANURGUS in a way is the same as FRA ROSIE CROSSE.

image.png.b69052aa76a779a19dc8d3580579acfd.png

I think you knew I would bring this up A. Phoenix, but I was waiting for your prompt! 🙂

I am still fascinated by this Purge concept. It is soooooo important!

Bacon: Hey Martin, I'd love to have you do a custom engraving for me.

Martin: I'd be honored. What do you have in mind?

Bacon: How about a recreation of the famous Purge engraving with creatures being pooped out and fun follies in the smoke of the furnace?

Martin: Can I engrave you in as well?

Bacon: Sure, but make me younger, PLEASE!

Panurgus? I see "Purge" and "Pan". Does Bacon intend we think he will "Purge Pan" of bad energy and folly?

 

 

image.png.583bbe2649bf62b8c6857cf8c3fa3bf1.png

image.png.3f0a69882f6dd0681b11727738807e35.png

😊

 

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8 hours ago, Kate said:

 

ChatGPT on furnaces:

In both Mystic Christianity and Rosicrucianism, furnaces can hold symbolic significance. Here is some information on their potential symbolism in these traditions:

Mystic Christianity: In Christian mysticism, furnaces are often associated with the concept of purification and transformation. The imagery of a furnace represents the spiritual process of purging and refining the soul, burning away impurities and worldly attachments. It is akin to the metaphorical "fire" of divine love that consumes and transforms the individual, leading to spiritual growth and union with God.

The furnace can also symbolize the trials and challenges one encounters on the spiritual path. Just as gold is purified in fire, the individual undergoes spiritual trials and tests that refine their character and strengthen their faith.

Rosicrucianism: Rosicrucianism is a mystical and esoteric tradition associated with the concept of alchemy, spiritual transformation, and inner illumination. In this context, the furnace is often linked to the alchemical process of transmutation. It represents the alchemical vessel, known as the "athanor" or "alchemical furnace," where the transformation of base metals into gold takes place.

The furnace symbolizes the inner alchemical laboratory within the practitioner, where the transformation of the self occurs. It signifies the intense inner work, purification, and transformation of the individual's psyche and spirit. The alchemical furnace is seen as a metaphorical crucible, where the practitioner undergoes a process of inner purification and refinement to attain spiritual enlightenment and union with the divine.

Overall, in both Mystic Christianity and Rosicrucianism, the symbolism of furnaces is closely tied to the themes of purification, transformation, and spiritual growth. It represents the inner process of refining the soul, letting go of impurities, and experiencing a spiritual rebirth or illumination.

Hi Kate,

Your reference to the symbolism of the furnace in both Mystic Chistianity and Rosicrucianism reminded two Emblems from a Rosicrucian Book published for the first time in 1617 by Daniel Cramer.

Here are these two Emblems in the 1624 Edition (Emblemata Sacra)

https://archive.org/details/emblematasacraho00cram/page/n147/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

EMBLEM 33

SUFFER - LEARN

image.png.91216b0918fa1c79b37f9ddc52cb6190.png

Emblem 24

image.png.3f895822342f6079c729cf4bd5f47297.png

33 + 24 = 57

I also love Emblem 26 😉 

"Under the Shadow of thy Wing"

image.png.0ea5be3e54d09578977d20a3f1c53a40.png

But since many years my preference really goes to two Emblems from the 2nd Part (1624 Edition)

image.png.580fa667a24ff06cbea1f303ee0efd7b.png

image.png.42e4601af27f4145aa0e1be9bd40ec35.png

 

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57 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

image.png.583bbe2649bf62b8c6857cf8c3fa3bf1.png

image.png.3f0a69882f6dd0681b11727738807e35.png

😊

 

I saw that as well and wondered why the "little r"?

All four numbers have meaning. Bacon is telling us something.

We are opening a door into some meaning. Thank you A. Phoenix for Piercing the Veil!

 

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Kate,

Your reference to the symbolism of the furnace in both Mystic Chistianity and Rosicrucianism reminded two Emblems from a Rosicrucian Book published for the first time in 1617 by Daniel Cramer.

Here are these two Emblems in the 1624 Edition (Emblemata Sacra)

https://archive.org/details/emblematasacraho00cram/page/n147/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

EMBLEM 33

SUFFER - LEARN

image.png.91216b0918fa1c79b37f9ddc52cb6190.png

Emblem 24

image.png.3f895822342f6079c729cf4bd5f47297.png

33 + 24 = 57

I also love Emblem 26 😉 

"Under the Shadow of thy Wing"

image.png.0ea5be3e54d09578977d20a3f1c53a40.png

But since many years my preference really goes to two Emblems from the 2nd Part (1624 Edition)

image.png.580fa667a24ff06cbea1f303ee0efd7b.png

image.png.42e4601af27f4145aa0e1be9bd40ec35.png

 

Hi Yann. You are a mine of deep historical insights. Thank you. But let me get this straight... this image

ScreenShot2023-06-30at10_27_49am.png.418c25264ed2e03dc6c13c27a372f22a.png

... appeared one year after the First Folio, right? Is this, then, a representation of the true author of the Shakespeare works, or does it have nothing to do with authorship? A strange image to say the least.

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Hi Eric,

5 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Yann. You are a mine of deep historical insights. Thank you. But let me get this straight... this image

ScreenShot2023-06-30at10_27_49am.png.418c25264ed2e03dc6c13c27a372f22a.png

... appeared one year after the First Folio, right? Is this, then, a representation of the true author of the Shakespeare works, or does it have nothing to do with authorship? A strange image to say the least.

Hi Eric,

Thank you.

For the anecdote, this Book is my very first contact with The Book of Emblems in 2014.

At that time I knew nothing about Shakespeare, Francis Bacon and the Authorship Question.

I was interested in Oracles and I purchased a peculiar one with strange Emblems, and I felt the need to buy the 2013 edition of this Book to find out more about them.

AmorFati.jpg.2583bfe17fa7d097ceb7fb3840dc4232.jpg

Two years later, I discovered the Shakespeare Authorship Question and one day my research sent me back to this Book and I began to see the Emblems from an alternate aspect.

And yes, in my view Emblem XXII part II could be a reference to the Mask of Shakespeare.

And Emblem XXXI a reference to Francis Bacon , our English TERENCE ( Ne quid nimis is a quote from Terence and is the equivalent ofMediocria firma ).

Note that 22+ 31 = 53 = SWAN, SOW, POET

And talking about SWAN ...

https://archive.org/details/emblematasacraho00cram/page/n39/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

image.png.ca7affc578bf3207d6e27b5bb607a8d4.png

Note the arm that hold the Lamp ! 😉

Sonnet 46

Detail of old-spelling text

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet_46#/media/File:Sonnet_46_1609.jpg

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This is all fascinating. That swan arm!

Need some time to digest but just quickly, on the full page of Pro Forma, am I right in thinking that the Latin and French translations are referring to hypocrisy? As you are French Yann, is there anything interesting in the text? I just wonder if the mask is conveying the two-facedness of hypocrisy, rather than what I'd like it to be, which is a cryptic clue to the authorship.

On the Panurgus pic, the small r is intriguing and also the fact that the  understanding wisdom has been made to look like under wisdom standing .

While here I'll just mention that when I was reading through the Rosicrucian texts link I posted the other day,  https://archive.org/details/RosicrucianTexts/mode/1up I came across a rendering of the word Rosicrucian that I have never come across before - which is strange, as I have read a lot over the decades. It is Rhodo-staurotosophic  and Rhodostaurotic.

Rhodo-staurotic.jpg.cc47c8fefbce484ccf196d83f679d413.jpg

By the way, Adam McLean is a, if not THE, leading authority on alchemy and esotericism. If anyone reading this has never visited his site https://www.alchemywebsite.com/adam.html  it's an Aladdin's Cave. He also has a sister site, Levity.com. You'll be on it for hours! 

Also  want to highlight the word Magnalia. I obviously have seen this word before, but not given it much thought. I suddenly realised that perhaps it is the origin of The Book of M ?

ChatGPT says this of the word

Within the "Fama Fraternitatis" and other Rosicrucian writings, the term "Magnalia" referred to the great and miraculous works attributed to the fraternity and its members. It denoted the extraordinary achievements, mystical powers, and secret wisdom possessed by the Rosicrucians. These works were often described as having a transformative and enlightening effect on individuals and society as a whole.

The use of "Magnalia" in Rosicrucian thought emphasized the idea that the fraternity had access to hidden knowledge and possessed extraordinary abilities to bring about positive changes in the world. It added to the aura of mystery and wonder surrounding the Rosicrucians during that time.

 

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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7 hours ago, Kate said:

This is all fascinating. That swan arm!

Need some time to digest but just quickly, on the full page of Pro Forma, am I right in thinking that the Latin and French translations are referring to hypocrisy? As you are French Yann, is there anything interesting in the text? I just wonder if the mask is conveying the two-facedness of hypocrisy, rather than what I'd like it to be, which is a cryptic clue to the authorship.

Hi Kate,

Here is a translation of the first passage in latin on top of page 100 (Francis Bacon - simple cipher)

https://archive.org/details/emblematasacraho00cram/page/100/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

Aut Lupus,aut certè Vulpecula callida formam

Prae se sert fidei, nec pietate calet.

Quid specie fallente lates, homo Polype?

Virtus Doctrinae & Fidei non amat hanc speciem.

Or a Wolf, or certainly a cunning Fox.
Faith is set before him, and he is not warmed by piety.
What is it that you conceal by deceitful appearance, man Polypus?
Strength, Doctrine and Faith do not love this species.

EDIT :

I forgot to mention that , still in my view, the "cunning fox" is a reference to an oldest emblem :

Mentem, non formam plus pollere

https://www.emblems.arts.gla.ac.uk/alciato/emblem.php?id=FALa048

"A fox, entering the store-room of a theatrical producer, found an actor’s mask, skilfully shaped, so finely fashioned that the spirit alone was missing, in all else it seemed alive. Taking it up, the fox addressed it - What a head is this, but it has no brain!"

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Regarding "Rhodo-stauros" this term is used by Ben Jonson in his Masque " The Fortunate Isles and their union" when he makes a reference to Julian de Campis and "The Castle in the Aire". 😉 

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n389/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

image.png.446e16f7efab3319644d4eb8ea823793.png

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n389/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

And regarding "The Castle in the aire" here is a part of one of your recent post :

 https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1854-1113-154

Though concentrating on the foibles and follies of the gallant, who is by definition youthful, the verse makes clear that the Millions who resort to the Doctor come from Cuntry, Citty & the Court – i.e. that folly is no respecter of a person’s rank or origins. By his Waters Drugges ,Conserves & Potions, the Doctor purgeth fancies follies, Idle motions, many of which are detailed in the verses below the image, but also visualised in the phantasmagoria that escapes from the Gallants Fornace. The Doctor is currently pouring a dose labelled Wisdome and Understanding down the throat of a rude Rusticall who sits on a close-stool and through whom passe various animals and birds, including an ass, which is being milked by a man (in the German original only three little fools are excreted). The Doctor informs us that taking the Gallants Braine out and washing it had proved ineffective, but now, subliming his head in the furnace has yielded good Successe - in the form of the Strange Chimaera-Crotchetts visible in the smoke above. They are later referred to as both Projects and ayrie Castles - i.e. 'castles in the air', cf. from Burton’s contemporary Anatomy of Melancholy (1621): That castle in the ayr, that crochet, that whimsie[4] - and include cards, dice, backgammon-board, tobacco-pipes, violin, tennis, masks, feathers, plumed hat, swords, a dressed ape, a woman with a fan, a man teaching a horse to perform tricks, a bear-baiting, a boy flying a kite, a man with wings strapped to his shoulders (attempt at human flight? No Elizabethan/Jacobean candidate known to me, though doubtless they existed – for a while...), a man sliding down a rope from the tower of (Old) St. Paul's (a popular contemporary feat), jug and goblet, limed branch for bird-catching, a man walking a pair of hounds, and a fencer (with wings). Most of these are copied from the German original - the interest for us lies chiefly in those which were not, and which we may thus reasonably consider peculiarly English: they include the bear-baiting, the tobacco-pipes,[5] the St. Paul's rope-slider and the horse being taught tricks - perhaps intended to be William Banks and his celebrated horse 'Marocco'.[6]

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9 hours ago, Kate said:

While here I'll just mention that when I was reading through the Rosicrucian texts link I posted the other day,  https://archive.org/details/RosicrucianTexts/mode/1up I came across a rendering of the word Rosicrucian that I have never come across before - which is strange, as I have read a lot over the decades. It is Rhodo-staurotosophic  and Rhodostaurotic.

When I was a kid our family collected Rhodochrosite to make jewelry. Doesn't add to the current thread in any important way, but "Rhodo..." is familiar to me.

Rhodo- is a combining form used like a prefix meaning “rose” or “rose-colored,” i.e., “pink” or “red.” It is used in some medical and scientific terms, including in biology and geology.

Rhodo- comes from the Greek rhódon meaning “rose.” If this Greek root sounds familiar, it might be because it helps form the word rhododendron, a kind of shrub with pink and other colored flowers. Rhododendron literally translates to “rose tree” in Greek.

And while its ultimate origin is unclear, some scholars have connected the name of the Greek island of Rhodes, whose ancient harbor was home to the wondrous bronze statue known as the Colossus of Rhodes, to the Greek rhódon, “rose.”

image.png.ad5c8091159bcb5cf920259d83131184.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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20 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Yann. You are a mine of deep historical insights. Thank you. But let me get this straight... this image

ScreenShot2023-06-30at10_27_49am.png.418c25264ed2e03dc6c13c27a372f22a.png

... appeared one year after the First Folio, right? Is this, then, a representation of the true author of the Shakespeare works, or does it have nothing to do with authorship? A strange image to say the least.

Pro Forma here is being shown with a depiction of the idea that many things are done solely for appearance's sake as a formality. One puts on a mask because it is a way to introduce a sort of dialogue for the reader.  Plato, i.e.,  writes as if he is having a dialogue with Socrates, but all understand that it is Plato having a dialogue with himself. Socrates is a mask. This way to write is a formality when we understand the genre. 

Suggesting that this is pointing to a secret in an Shakespeare authorship question is an example of trying to interpret something with a desired end in mind, imo. That is almost always possible with images rich in symbolism.

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