Jump to content

The First Play of Francis Bacon-Shakespeare Written When he was Seven years old


A Phoenix

Recommended Posts

Prince Hal

Prince Hal in his forceful castigation of Falstaff explicitly invokes the morality play and the Vice figure to describe his character and his physical appearance

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 63.png

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It will be observed that in the passage Falstaff is likened to the Devil, likened to the Vice, just as like attracts like, in Like Will to Like.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 64.png

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Wonderful. It's as if SFB was consciously leaving thematic links  b e t w e e n  the plays as clues to his authorship.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Wooden Dagger

In Like Will to Like a key stage prop of Newfangle the Vice was the wooden dagger (wood sword, wood knife, etc) a comic weapon brandished by the Vice in the scene where Ralph Roister and Tom Tosspot eventually realise they have been duped by the Vice. Similarly in Richard III the Vice-like figure of Richard is never seen without his sword which almost appears as if it is a natural  extension of his being he continually toys with comically and menacingly. The same device of swinging a wooden dagger by Newfangle the Vice in Like Will to Like is similarly used by Falstaff in I Henry IV in an argument with Prince Hal: In Like Will to Like the Vice after leading astray both Cuthbert Cutpurse and Pierce Pickpurse with lies, deceit and false promises finally engineers their deaths at the end of a hangman’s rope which is alluded to in Henry V with its reference to the wooden dagger of the Vice:   

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

 

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 66.png

  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another aspect of Like Will to Like which later finds an echo in one of the Jacobean Shakespeare plays is the stage direction in the opening scene when the Vice is joined on stage by the Devil where he is branded: ‘This name Lucifer, must be written on his back and on his brest’. Professor Craik points to its reverberation in Measure for Measure where Angelo is speaking of ‘swelling evil’ and ‘false seeming’ known characteristics of the Devil and the Vice:

…in Like will to Like Satan is compared by the vice to “Tom tumbler or els some dauncing beare” and is so grotesque that he has to be labelled: “This name Lucifer, must be written on his back and on his brest.” Shakespeare is perhaps referring to such a practice when he makes Angelo exclaim in Measure for Measure:

                                  Let’s write ‘good angel’ on the devil’s horn

                                  ’Tis now the devil’s crest.

                              [Measure for Measure: 2: 4: 16-17]

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

 

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 68.png

  • Like 2
  • Wow! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Twelfth Night

The most important connection of all the Shakespeare plays with Like Will to Like is Twelfth Night, or What You Will. The links between Like Will for Like and Twelfth Night, or What You Will are clear, numerous and manifest, and set in train a series of interlocking pointers and signs, towards a great historical truth hidden from the world for more than four hundred and fifty years.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 69.png

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The passage below is furnished with Notes in the Arden, Cambridge and new Bloomsbury Arden edition of Twelfth Night, or What You Will in which they explain the references and allusions to Like Will to Like:

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 70.png

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

 

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 70.png

 

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/TN_F1/page/14/index.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/286/index.html%3Fzoom=800.html

To. I biddy, come with me. What man, tis not for
grauity to play at cherrie-pit with
sathan Hang him foul
Colliar.
 
Hmm, "sathan"?
 
 
Something that has caught my attention in the past year of B'Hive is how anytime the word "hang" pops up it is not hard for me to find a "Bacon" near by. The joke goes back to Sir Nicholas, as we know.
 
Gazing at "Like Will to Like" (which is 155 Simple cipher like WILL SHAKESPEARE) I see "hang" on most pages sometimes several times. I think I saw 19 search results in the 1623 Folio version of "What You Will" with "hang".
 
image.png.da90a4b09f778aae687d1e915e51df2c.png
 
There is a carnival of delights even in this image. I highlighted a taste. I'm curious about the "sha..." appearances not highlited.
 
Granted, I am now finding out that not every "hang" has "Bacon" hanging from it, but with my mind I can find his presence even alone in the woods. 😉
 
 
  • Wow! 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love Twelfe Night, or, What you will.

Malvolio is a voice of Bacon, his Ill Will.

   Mal. Go hang your selues all: you are ydle shallowe
things, I am not of your element, you
shall knowe more
heereafter. Exit

I read the interpretations of Malvolio by scholars, etc. I've read this play, laughing and cringing.

Malvolio to me is a voice where Bacon is sharing a piece of the frustration of being Will Tudor but screwed in his life. From Like Will to Like to What You Will, Bacon's life is one of a suffering Will. Malvolio is Will. Volio even means Will, right?

Bacon signs his name along with one of the most famous phrases he ever conceived.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/293/index.html%3Fzoom=800.html

image.png.9e8a7f0ce5ecc6fc1bfc7bac3d28b2ef.png

We shall know more hereafter.

  • Like 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In all of the works of Bacon as Shakespeare, I suggest this is one of the handful of speeches he makes as any character that was deeply from his aching heart and soul to his birth Mother who wronged him so bad. The letter from "The madly us'd Maluolio." (Or Ill Will as one interpretation. Mad Will is another.)

image.png.338c210dcc0fee79e9c5d779adbd5370.png

At least Bacon could say this in a play using a word play character of his real name, Will.

Elizabeth wronged him and the world Will know it. James claimed the crown Bacon deserved, and William Tudor was wronged. Somewhere there is a letter from Elizabeth still preserved that tells this story. Where is it?? Somebody has it, and knows exactly what it is.

Sorry, I feel Malvolio's pain and no matter what you think of the character being tricked and a Foole, Bacon is speaking through him sharing his most passionate feelings. He was a very Mad Will when you get right into who he was.

I would have exploded into a million pieces, I cannot imagine how he maintained his public composure.

  • Wow! 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The actual page 287 of the Folio is numbered page 269.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/287/index.htmlzoom=1275.html

image.png.4e90ad3971fdba27c171d41fb8493d24.png

Down the right column is a great F BACON W TUDOR I acrostic:

image.png.ed37a6be176bb984857ee055259f2dea.png

I am sure Allisnum2er (Yann) has pointed this out on a page count of 287, or A. Phoenix perhaps, or Kate...

But it popped up today anyway.

What do you think of this "Will" quote by Bacon?

"Will is to an intellectual power as the instrument to the hand, or the foot to the leg. It is not to be denied, but men of the greatest action and resolution have commonly great wills; for the execution of their designs is deferred upon the power of their wills and resolutions, wherein they are not easily diverted by particular respects."

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great work Rob and some brilliant connections. Think you're completely right with the Malvolio quote - awesome from the Great One for putting his most personal feelings into the mouth of an unlikely character and great work from you for spotting it! 🙏♥️

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Feste the Disguised Fool

In Act 4 Scene 2 Feste disguises himself as the good curate Sir Topias sent to examine Malvolio’s alleged madness and demonic possession. In disguise Feste says ‘Fie, thou dishonest Satan-I call thee by the most modest terms, for I am one of those gentle ones that will use the devil himself with courtesy. Sayest thou that house is dark’ to which Malvolia replies ‘As hell, Sir Topas’ (4:2: 32-6). Sir Toby confides with Feste telling him we would be well rid of his knavery a characteristic associated with the Vice.  Feste continues to taunt and torture him by asking whether Malvolio was mad or a counterfeit before delivering the following song:  

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

 

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 72.png

  • Like 2
  • Wow! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Francis Bacon

His recent modern editors Stewart and Knight confirm that some of Bacon’s writing circulated under another’s name; his second editor and Rosicrucian Brother Thomas Tenison (afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury) says those who have a true skill in the writings of Bacon will be able to tell if he was the author of a piece even though his name not be to it; the historian and biographer David Lloyd stated that at twelve his industry was above the capacity and his mind above the reach of his contemporaries; his private chaplain and secretary who lived with Bacon for the last ten years of his life and was his first editor and English biographer stated that ‘His first, and childish, years, were not without some Mark of Eminency; At which Time, he was endued, with that Pregnancy and towardness, of Wit; As they were Presages, of that Deep, and Universall, Apprehension, which was manifest in him, afterward’; in De Augmentis Scientiarum after the twelfth of his Colours of Good and Evil (of which there are around a hundred in his private note-book), the central theme of his morality play Like Will to Like, Bacon reveals he started collecting them in his youth (i.e. while he was young) and in the closing song of Twelfth Night or What You Will he reveals that when he was a young boy he wrote the morality play Like Will to Like:

[Alan Stewart with Harriet Knight, eds., The Oxford Francis Bacon: Early Writings 1584-1596 (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2012), p. xxviii; T. Tenison, ed., Baconiana (London: printed by J. D. for Richard Chiswell, 1679), p. 79; David Lloyd, State Worthies: Or, The Statesmen and Favourites Of England (London: first printed 1665; reprinted for J. Robson, 1746), II, William Rawley, ed., Resuscitatio (London: printed by Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657), B2r; Spedding, Works, IV, p. 472]

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

LIKE WILL TO LIKE 74.png

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/13/2023 at 3:18 AM, Light-of-Truth said:

The actual page 287 of the Folio is numbered page 269.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/287/index.htmlzoom=1275.html

image.png.4e90ad3971fdba27c171d41fb8493d24.png

Down the right column is a great F BACON W TUDOR I acrostic:

image.png.ed37a6be176bb984857ee055259f2dea.png

I am sure Allisnum2er (Yann) has pointed this out on a page count of 287, or A. Phoenix perhaps, or Kate...

But it popped up today anyway.

What do you think of this "Will" quote by Bacon?

"Will is to an intellectual power as the instrument to the hand, or the foot to the leg. It is not to be denied, but men of the greatest action and resolution have commonly great wills; for the execution of their designs is deferred upon the power of their wills and resolutions, wherein they are not easily diverted by particular respects."

 

 

A Phoenix, this is a real pleasure, after a short break, to find back your great posts with your inescapable comparative analysis of Like Will to like with Shakespeare's Plays! ❤️

Rob, I second A Phoenix ! This is a great finding !❤️

And I do not believe that we have analysed this page before.😊

As I was looking at your deciphering, I noticed the word "WIT" in the middle, right above your cursor.

I decided to apply the "mediocria" technic and here is the result ...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/287/index.htmlzoom=1275.html

WILL YOU DENY ME NOW ?

480923575_2023-05-14(2).png.95351b2d3098200eabf952710b21af60.png

WIT / TUDOR / ROYAL / YEW ?

I noticed  "bacon" on the bottom left thanks to the different letter "a" in "lacke".

Regarding the word "YEW", if it was really intended by Bacon, I don't know its meaning yet.

My first thought was for the Ogham and the yew tree.

And my research led me to this interesting modern poem. 😉 

https://whitecatgrove.wordpress.com/2018/06/15/ogham-poem-idad-the-yew-tree/

  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...