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The First Play of Francis Bacon-Shakespeare Written When he was Seven years old


A Phoenix

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FRANCIS BACON WAS A UNIQUE CHILD PRODIGY THE GREATEST YOUNG GENIUS THE WORLD HAS EVER SEEN.                                                                            

                                                                                      Give me a child until he is seven and I will give you the man.

                                                                                                    [Aristotle, The Philosophy of Aristotle]

His first, and childish, years, were not without some Mark of Eminency; At which Time, he was endued, with that Pregnancy and towardness, of Wit; As they were Presages, of that Deep, and Universall, Apprehension, which was manifest in him, afterward.

[William Rawley, ed., Resuscitatio, Or, Bringing into Publick Light Several Pieces, Of The Works, Civil, Historical, Philosophical, & Theological, Hitherto Sleeping; Of the Right Honourable Francis Bacon (London: printed by Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657), B2r] 

He had a large mind from his father, and great abilities from his mother; his parts improved more than his years: his great, fixed, and methodical memory, his solid judgment, his quick fancy, his ready expression, gave high assurance of that profound and universal knowledge and comprehension of things which then rendered him the observation of great and wise men, and afterwards the wonder of all…At twelve, his industry was above the capacity, and his mind above the reach of his contemporaries. 

[David Lloyd, State Worthies: Or, The Statesmen and Favourites Of England, ed., By Charles Whitworth (London: printed for J. Robson, 1746), II, ‘Observations on the Life of Sir Francis Bacon’, pp. 118-9]

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THE EARLIEST PLAY LIKE WILL TO LIKE WRITTEN BY OUR BACON-SHAKESPEARE.

The play written by Bacon when he was only seven years old was placed on the Stationers’ Register in circa September 1568 ‘Recevyd of John alde for his lycense for prynting of a play lyke Wyll to lyke quod the Deuell to the Collyer …iiijd’. It was first printed towards the end of 1568 by the printer John Allde to give it its full title as An Enterlude Intituled Like Wil to Like quod the Deuel to the Colier, very godly and full of pleasant mirth. Wherin is declared not onely what punishment followeth those that wil rather followe licentious liuing, then to esteem & followe good councel: and what great benefits and commodities they receiue that apply them unto vertuous liuing and good exercises. In Like Will to Like the young genius marked its true provenance with an anagram on the very first page of its text. It commences with the name of Lady Bacon’s favourite author Cicero in its first six lines (3+3=6 which when the numbers 3 and 3 are placed together they yield 33 Bacon in simple cipher) in its first paragraph as follows:  

                       CIcero in his book de amicitia these woords dooth expresse,

                          Saying nothing is more desirous then like is unto like

                          Whose woords are moste true & of a certaintie doutles:

                       For the vertuous doo not the vertuous company mislike.

                       But the vicious doo the vertuous company eschue:

                       And like wil unto like, this is moste true.

It will be observed that the first letters commencing the first six lines are C, S, W, F, B, A which form an anagram. Due to the deliberate formatting four letters F BAC are separated by the indenting of the other two lines. If we rearrange the four letters they alone spell out F BAC evidently a contraction of F. Bacon. Yet we need not solely rely on this contraction. The other two letters required to spell out F. Bacon the O and N are printed next to the F and A in the fourth and sixth lines respectively thus yielding F BACON in full. The other two remaining letters W and S numerically represent the equivalent of 21 and 18: 21+18=39 F. Bacon in simple cipher. The first line (not including ‘de amicitia’ which is in different type) comprises 39 letters again F. Bacon in simple cipher and the last line 33 letters Bacon in simple cipher which is the sixth line: 33+6=39 F. Bacon in simple cipher. The six line paragraph contains 56 words Fr. Bacon in simple cipher. The whole page itself comprises the header ‘The Prologue’ and 32 full lines of text: 1+32=33 Bacon in simple cipher. When this is added to the 3 letters in the signature (B. ii) and the 3 letters in the tail-word ‘And’: 33+3+3= 39 F. Bacon in simple cipher.

              A  B  C  D   E  F  G  H  I   K   L  M  N  O  P  Q   R  S   T  U  W  X   Y   Z

               1  2  3  4   5  6  7   8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

             B  A  C  O  N                 F.  B A C  O   N                  F  R  B A  C O   N

             2   1  3 14 13=33         6   2  1  3 14 13=39          6  17  2  1  3 14 13=56

LIKE WILL TO LIKE.jpg

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IN DE AUGMENTIS ANDTWELFTH NIGHT, OR WHAT YOU WILL BACON OBLIQUELY REVEALS THAT HE WROTE LIKE WILL TO LIKE.

The morality play Like Will To Like is about good and evil and its central character is Newfangle the Vice. The dichotomy of good and evil or the colours of good and evil was later written large across the much more expansive canvass of his Shakespeare poems and plays and as pointed out by orthodox editors and scholars the figure of the Vice is refracted through various Shakespeare villains and characters i.e., Lucrece, Aaron the Moor in Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Don John in Much Ado About Nothing, Iago in Othello, etc, etc.

From his early days until his last the subject of good and evil profoundly engaged his vast intellect. Over the period of his lifetime Bacon assembled around a hundred of what he calls ‘Semblances or popularities of good and evill with their regulations for deliberacions’ in his Promus of Formularies and Elegancies (his private note-book) in which he jotted down thoughts and phrases some of which he later used in his acknowledged writings and his Shakespeare poems and plays.

When towards the end of his recorded life Bacon revised and greatly enlarged the Advancement for its Latin translation De Augmentis Scientiarum Libri IX he makes an astonishing admission:

I have by me indeed a great many more Sophisms of the same kind, which I collected in my youth; but without their illustrations and answers, which I have not now the leisure to perfect; and to set forth the naked colours without their illustrations (especially as those above given appear in full dress) does not seem suitable. Be it observed in the meantime that this matter, whatever may be thought of it, seems to me of no small value; as that which participates of Primary Philosophy, of Politics, and of Rhetoric. And so much for the Popular Signs or Colours of Apparent Good and Evil, both simple and comparative.

[Spedding, Works, IV, p. 472]

The links between Like Will for Like and Twelfth Night, or What You Will are clear, numerous and manifest, and set in train a series of interlocking signs pointing towards a great historical truth hidden from the world for more than four hundred and fifty years. In the first of these the Vice-like figure of Sir Toby Belch in an exchange with Malvolio (as well as others) says:   

                     SIR TOBY  Ay, biddy, come with me. What man, ’tis not

                         for gravity to play at cherry-pit with Satan. Hang him,

                         foul collier.

                            [Twelfth Night, Or What You Will: 3:4:114-16]       

The above passage is furnished with the following Notes in the Arden, Cambridge and new Bloomsbury Arden edition of Twelfth Night, or What You Will:

foul collier] dirty coalman. Coalmen were proverbially associated with the devil for their blackness and dishonest dealing; cf. Tilley L287, which is also the title of Ulpian Fulwell’s play, Like Will to Like, quoth the Devil to the Collier, pr. 1568; it contains the lyric ‘Tom Collier of Croydon hath sold his coals,/And made his market today,/And now he danceth with the Devil,/For like will to like alway.’

[J. Lothian and T. W. Craik, ed., Twelfth Night (London: Methuen & Co Ltd., 1975), pp. 99-100]

foul collier i.e. ‘the fiend’ of 96, from the proverb (Tilley L 287) ‘Like will to like, quoth the devil to the collier.’ As a dealer in pit-coal, a collier was assumed to be like the devil, black in heart as well as in appearance. An interlude dating from 1568 by Ulpian Fulwell uses this proverb as its title…

[Elizabeth Story Donno, ed., Twelfth Night Or What You Will (Cambridge University Press, 1985, 2003), p. 124]

foul collier dirty coalman, with reference to the devil’s blackness. The association is proverbial: ‘Like will to like, quoth the devil to the collier’ (Dent. L 287), which is also the title of a 1568 play by Ulpian Fulwell.

[Keir Elam, ed., Twelfth Night, Or What You Will (Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2008, 2016), p. 281]

In the play Feste agrees to fetch Malvolio some paper and ink before delivering the following song:  

                   FESTE                  I am gone , sir

                                                     And anon, sir,

                                                        Ill be with you again,

                                                     In a trice,

                                                     Like to the old Vice,

                                                        Your need to sustain,

                                                     Who with dagger of lath

                                                     In his rage and his wrath

                                                         Cries ‘Aha,’ to the devil,

                                                    Like a mad lad,

                                                    ‘Pare thy nails, dad,

                                                        Adieu, goodman devil.’

                                  [Twelfth Night, Or What You Will: 4:2:123-34] 

The song explicitly refers to the old Vice and his staple weapon the wooden dagger in the morality play, but not any old morality play, the one already very clearly signalled above, specifically, the morality play Like Will to Like.  in the closing song of Twelfth Night or What You Will Bacon reveals that when he was a young boy he wrote the morality play Like Will to Like:

                        FESTE (sings)

                                 When that I was and a little tiny boy,        

                                     With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

                                 A foolish thing was but a toy,

                                     For the rain it raineth every day.

                                 But when I came to man’s estate,

                                     With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

                                  ’Gainst knaves and thieves men shut their gate,

                                      For the rain it raineth every day.

 

                                  But when I came, alas, to wive,

                                     With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

                                  By swaggering could I never thrive,

                                      For the rain it raineth every day.

 

                                  But when I came unto my beds,

                                     With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

                                  With tosspots still had drunken heads,

                                     For the rain it raineth every day.

 

                                   A great while ago the world begun,

                                       With hey, ho, the wind and the rain,

                                   But that’s all one, our play is done,

                                       And we will strive to please you every day.

                              [Twelfth Night, Or What You Will: 5:1:385-404]

When I was a young boy I wrote a foolish thing but a toy (in his essay Of Masques and Triumphs Bacon begins ‘These things are but toys’) about knaves and thieves (the characters in Like Will to Like) one of whom was the swaggering Newfangle the Vice, a play which included tosspots with drunken heads Ralfe Roister and Tom Tosspot, and others led astray by the Vice where like attracted like in a play called Like Will to Like.      

 'Francis Bacon’s authorship of the play Like Will to Like written when he was only seven years old.'

https://sirbacon.org/a-phoenix/

 

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Like Will to Like

Francis Bacon wrote the play Like Will to Like when he was seven years old. This morality play is about good and evil and its central character is Newfangle the Vice. The dichotomy of good and evil or the colours of good and evil was later written large across the much more expansive canvass of his Shakespeare poems and plays and as pointed out by orthodox editors and scholars the figure of the Vice is refracted through various Shakespeare villains and characters i.e. Lucrece, Aaron the Moor in Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Don John in Much Ado About Nothing, Iago in Othello, etc.

From his early days until his last the subject of good and evil profoundly engaged his vast intellect. Over the period of his lifetime Bacon assembled a very large number of what he calls ‘Semblances or popularities of good and evill with their regulations for deliberacions’ in his Promus of Formularies and Elegancies (his private note-book) in which he jotted down thoughts and phrases some of which he later used in his acknowledged writings and his Shakespeare poems and plays. In the Promus there are around a hundred of his collection of colours of good and evil presented without any explanation indicating Bacon intended to publish a substantial treatise on the subject. However the first published version entitled Of the Colours of Good and Evil A Fragment printed in the first edition of his Essays includes only ten from the hundred in the Promus.

When towards the end of his recorded life Bacon revised and greatly enlarged the Advancement for its Latin translation De Augmentis Scientiarum he reprinted the original fragment of the Colours of Good and Evil printed in the first edition of his Essays to which he added a further two colours. After the twelfth and final colour of good and evil he makes an astonishing admission:

 ‘I have by me indeed a great many more Sophisms [Colours of Good and Evil] of the same kind, which I collected in my youth’.

And in the closing song of Twelfth Night or What You Will Bacon reveals that when he was a young boy he wrote the morality play Like Will to Like.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

 

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The Fulwells

In the 1560s Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon was presiding over a long running and complicated law suit brought by Thomas Fulwell and his wife and widow Christabel Fulwell relating to lands leased from the Cathedral of Wells. We learn from a bill in the Court of Chancery addressed by Christabel Fulwell on 13 October 1564 to Sir Nicholas Bacon that the dispute between the powerful Dean of Wells and the Fulwells was settled in their favour. However the lawsuits and protracted legal wrangles arising from the dispute continued for decades and resulted in their son Ulpian Fulwell never gaining custody of the land which his father rented from John Goodman the Dean of Wells which still decades later remained a matter of litigation for his own children.

Irving Ribner, ‘Ulpian Fulwell And His Family’, Notes And Queries, 195 (1950), pp. 444-48 and Irving Ribner, ‘Ulpian Fulwell And The Court Of High Commission’, Notes and Queries, 196 (1951), pp. 268-70

 

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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Ulpian Fulwell

With the Fulwell family complex legal disputes being dealt with by Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon following the death of his father sometime in 1563 Ulpian Fulwell studied to be a clergyman and was ordained on 15 September 1566. Around 1567-8   Fulwell became engaged to Marie Stubbard but the marriage was abandoned after he discovered she was already married to William Gascoigne, who through the marriage of Elizabeth Bacon Bretton (her beloved cousin Lord Keeper Nicholas Bacon was the supervisor of her father’s will) to George Gascoigne some seven years earlier, was a distant relative of a young Francis Bacon with whom Fulwell already had some kind of secret and concealed relationship. It was around the time that the planned marriage to one of Bacon’s relatives was abandoned, a play entitled Like Will to Like, Quod the Devil to the Collier was printed in the name of Ulpian Fulwell in 1568. Fulwell had no known interest in theatre and drama and is not known to have written another play or any other form of dramatic entertainment in the remaining eighteen years of his life. He also was not the author of Like Will to Like.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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On 2/26/2022 at 6:39 AM, A Phoenix said:

THE EARLIEST PLAY LIKE WILL TO LIKE WRITTEN BY OUR BACON-SHAKESPEARE.

The play written by Bacon when he was only seven years old was placed on the Stationers’ Register in circa September 1568 ‘Recevyd of John alde for his lycense for prynting of a play lyke Wyll to lyke quod the Deuell to the Collyer …iiijd’. It was first printed towards the end of 1568 by the printer John Allde to give it its full title as An Enterlude Intituled Like Wil to Like quod the Deuel to the Colier, very godly and full of pleasant mirth. Wherin is declared not onely what punishment followeth those that wil rather followe licentious liuing, then to esteem & followe good councel: and what great benefits and commodities they receiue that apply them unto vertuous liuing and good exercises. In Like Will to Like the young genius marked its true provenance with an anagram on the very first page of its text. It commences with the name of Lady Bacon’s favourite author Cicero in its first six lines (3+3=6 which when the numbers 3 and 3 are placed together they yield 33 Bacon in simple cipher) in its first paragraph as follows:  

                       CIcero in his book de amicitia these woords dooth expresse,

                          Saying nothing is more desirous then like is unto like

                          Whose woords are moste true & of a certaintie doutles:

                       For the vertuous doo not the vertuous company mislike.

                       But the vicious doo the vertuous company eschue:

                       And like wil unto like, this is moste true.

It will be observed that the first letters commencing the first six lines are C, S, W, F, B, A which form an anagram. Due to the deliberate formatting four letters F BAC are separated by the indenting of the other two lines. If we rearrange the four letters they alone spell out F BAC evidently a contraction of F. Bacon. Yet we need not solely rely on this contraction. The other two letters required to spell out F. Bacon the O and N are printed next to the F and A in the fourth and sixth lines respectively thus yielding F BACON in full. The other two remaining letters W and S numerically represent the equivalent of 21 and 18: 21+18=39 F. Bacon in simple cipher. The first line (not including ‘de amicitia’ which is in different type) comprises 39 letters again F. Bacon in simple cipher and the last line 33 letters Bacon in simple cipher which is the sixth line: 33+6=39 F. Bacon in simple cipher. The six line paragraph contains 56 words Fr. Bacon in simple cipher. The whole page itself comprises the header ‘The Prologue’ and 32 full lines of text: 1+32=33 Bacon in simple cipher. When this is added to the 3 letters in the signature (B. ii) and the 3 letters in the tail-word ‘And’: 33+3+3= 39 F. Bacon in simple cipher.

              A  B  C  D   E  F  G  H  I   K   L  M  N  O  P  Q   R  S   T  U  W  X   Y   Z

               1  2  3  4   5  6  7   8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

             B  A  C  O  N                 F.  B A C  O   N                  F  R  B A  C O   N

             2   1  3 14 13=33         6   2  1  3 14 13=39          6  17  2  1  3 14 13=56

LIKE WILL TO LIKE.jpg

Thanks for bringing this back, A. Phoenix. I had forgotten about it! I must have been in a busy time February 2022. 🙂

I'm attaching a facsimile of the 1587 edition that is readily available online.

Fascinating that Bacon was 7 years old when he wrote this. Also even more fascinating are the cipher clues we know and love from his adult concealed works!

Note the word "hangman" on the title page. Almost every time in Shakespeare we see the word "hang" there is a "BACON" cipher beneath it.

image.png.b5347f15ebe2b33e515f2bc52502041b.png

I haven't seen a "BACON" on this page, but the very next page, as A. Phoenix has described does have a "BACON" that begins the Prologue. 

image.png.2d3f6a7f9c9011d14d5a555379e191a7.png

But there is more!

If we share the "o" in "for" we can see F BACON and TUDOR. Plus the WS hints at William Shakespeare.

LIKE WILL TO LIKE is 155 Simple cipher, the same as WILL SHAKESPEARE.

Yes, I know the accepted story is Bacon did not know he was a Tudor until a few years later. But maybe this hints he was well aware he was a Tudor, possibly Will Tudor, and maybe also he was aware of the name William Shakespeare that he was going to use?

I know, seems too incredible to believe. But here we are looking at a seven year old's first book and the first paragraph says it all; Bacon, Tudor, and WS. That foretells his entire life story by 1568!

In the clip above we even see the word "name" which fits in perfectly. 😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like-will-to-like--d-Ulpian-Fulwell-[ebooksread.com].pdf

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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<-- 1 8 8 1 1
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24 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I know, seems too incredible to believe. But here we are looking at a seven year old's first book and the first paragraph says it all; Bacon, Tudor, and WS. That foretells his entire life story by 1568!

Bacon had secrets, and he was the Master at keeping them hidden while revealing them in ciphers.

We have a story of the Royal birth being revealed to Bacon in his teens just before he is sent away by Elizabeth. If that is the case, then he had to learn to keep a HUGE secret very quickly. That's a hard thing to do for anybody.

If he knew who his real Mother was from a very early age and grew up holding his secrets it makes more sense and better explains why he was so good at it.

Just a thought.

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Another thought...

At seven years old, the little genius was writing a play, "Like will to Like."

Where was Nicholas and Anne Bacon when Francis was writing? Who was proof-reading his first drafts? Correcting his young mistakes?

"Like will to Like" must have some recognizable characteristics of both his "public" parents. I would suggest for someone with time, connecting this 1568 play with Lady Anne's ideas would nail down a series of Bacon/Shakespeare connections to follow over his lifetime.

Seven is young for even a super-genius. Luckily Francis had two genius parents raising him along with Elizabeth's DNA intelligence and breeding.

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31 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Another thought...

At seven years old, the little genius was writing a play, "Like will to Like."

Where was Nicholas and Anne Bacon when Francis was writing? Who was proof-reading his first drafts? Correcting his young mistakes?

"Like will to Like" must have some recognizable characteristics of both his "public" parents. I would suggest for someone with time, connecting this 1568 play with Lady Anne's ideas would nail down a series of Bacon/Shakespeare connections to follow over his lifetime.

Seven is young for even a super-genius. Luckily Francis had two genius parents raising him along with Elizabeth's DNA intelligence and breeding.

Of course I could read what A. Phoenix already researched and discovered, or read a little every day as they post a day's worth to read. Its fun for me to explore on a daily basis. I do Love the B'Hive on SirBacon.org!

Or I could get motivated and read the entire article in 266 minutes. (It would take me 2,660 minutes! LOL)

https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

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Child Prodigies

There have been many outstanding child prodigies in history: J. S. Mill learned to read Greek at three, Mozart wrote his first composition at six, Montaigne could read and translate Ovid at seven and Picasso made his first oil painting when he was nine.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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Queen Elizabeth

Closer to home from the age of eleven Bacon’s secret royal mother Queen Elizabeth produced letters, wrote poetry, and was able to speak five languages fluently, namely Greek, Latin, French, Italian and Spanish, and she translated several classical and modern works in both prose and verse.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

 

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Hi Kate,

I had not thought about the possible similarities between the Like Will to Like title page and the 1609 edition of the Shakespeare Sonnets

I do obviously recall that you, Rob and Yann did some great work on the title page and other parts of the 1609 edition and on this one I will certainly defer to your greater expertise and look forward to any suggestions and observations on the matter.

Love A. P.

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Influences

Certainly, the persons and influences that shape our lives and minds begins early and Francis was raised and surrounded by writers, poets and dramatists from his early childhood right through into adulthood and beyond. His foster-parents who raised him Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Bacon were concealed poets, writers, and translators, who circulated in manuscript and printed anonymously various religious and political writings.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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The Bacons

His foster-mother Lady Anne Bacon was one of the celebrated four Cooke sisters. The eldest Mildred Cooke married Sir William Cecil, afterwards Queen Elizabeth’s Principal Secretary of State who with his brother-in-law Sir Nicholas Bacon, was the Grand Architect of the Elizabeth Reformation. The Cooke-Bacon-Cecil family had very close private, social and political ties, with shared London mansions within a stone throw of each other on the Strand and also spent much time at each others country estates in Hertfordshire.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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The Cooke Sisters

The other renowned and famed Cooke sister Elizabeth, first married courtier and diplomat Sir Thomas Hoby, the translator of Castiglione’s Il Cortegiano into English as The Courtier the well-known source of a substantial number of Shakespeare plays (Loves Labours Lost, I and 2 Henry IV, Henry V, Much Ado About Nothing, Hamlet and Measure for Measure, etc). She afterwards married John, Lord Russell eldest son and heir to Francis Russell, second Earl of Bedford (Bacon’s godfather and political patron). Her second husband John, Lord Russell appears as a character in the Henry IV plays as one of Falstaff’s crew with Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby herself the model for the Dowager Countess of Roussillon in Alls Well That Ends Well.

 [Alice-Lyle Scoufos, Shakespeare’s Typological Satire (Ohio University Press, 1979), ‘“Enter: Sir John Russell and Harvey”’, pp. 221-45 and Chris Laoutaris, Shakespeare and the Countess The Battle that Gave Birth to the Globe (Penguin Books, 2014), pp. 233, 239, 271, 289, 392-3, and 392-409] 

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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Bacon's Aunt - Lady Elizabeth Cooke

Her first and only modern editor Professor Phillippy writes of Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell that she expressed herself ‘in a myriad of registers in multiple media’ with her voice conveyed through unpublished letters, manuscript poems, monumental inscriptions and elegies, ceremonial performances and two masques or dramatic devices.

[Patricia Phillippy, ed., The Writings of an English Sappho Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell (Toronto: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2011), pp. 5, 271-2].

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #ShakespeareAuthorship  #LikeWillToLike 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45176854/The_play_Like_Will_to_Like_written_by_Francis_Bacon_when_he_was_only_seven_years_old_one_of_three_works_written_in_the_name_of_Ulpian_Fulwell_and_their_links_to_the_Shakespeare_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/y42VMzO0ztY

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Good evening A Phoenix,

I've just noticed an interesting difference between the Title-page of the 1st edition and the one of the 1587 edition, a difference that could be a clue.

For one / For another

image.png.064013183880858ab7cc81f62ec67683.png

Notice the characters that looks like a C.

Right below "Made by Vlpian Fulwel" they can be mistaken for Cs and inverted Cs, concealing the number 33, thrice.

And just for fun ... 3 x 33 + 3(the One before "An Interlude") = 102 

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