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A Shakespeare Book Withdrawn


Kate

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I’m assuming the fact this book was withdrawn is just Librarian’s code for ‘it’s too old and beaten up now’ but it’s what attracted me to open it, and I’m so glad I did.  https://archive.org/details/williamshakespea0000hami

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Eric, I think you might like this. It’s full of old illustrations/images in between the text. 

The book itself was written in 1900.

Here is a selection, but there are a lot more.

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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4 hours ago, Kate said:

I’m assuming the fact this book was withdrawn is just Librarian’s code for ‘it’s too old and beaten up now’ but it’s what attracted me to open it, and I’m so glad I did.  https://archive.org/details/williamshakespea0000hami

Maybe it was withdrawn due to its Stratfordian fluff. LOL

End of page 171 and some of page 172:

https://archive.org/details/williamshakespea0000hami/page/171/mode/1up?q=inn

“The Comedy of Errors” belongs to this period of tentative work, and is interesting as showing Shakespeare’s familiarity with the traditional form of comedy and as marking the point of his departure from it. It was first published in the Folio of 1623, but it was presented as early as the Christ-mas season of 1594, in the hall of Gray’s Inn; and its production was accompanied by considerable disorder in the audience, which must have been composed chiefly of benchers and their guests. This disturbance is mentioned by.a chronicler in the same year in these words: “ After much sport, a Comedy of Errors was played by the players; so that night began and continued to the end, in nothing but confusion and errors; whereupon it was ever afterwards called the ‘Night of Errors.’” The main, although not the only, source of the plot was the Menzchmi of Plautus, in which the Latin comedian develops the almost unlimited possibility of blunders which lies in mistakes of identity — then as now a popular device with playwrights and storytellers. Shakespeare may have read the comedy in the original, or in a translation by William Warner, which was not published until the year following the presentation of the “ Comedy of Errors,” but which was probably in existence in manuscript much earlier. In this form many pieces of prose and verse which later became famous were passed from hand to hand; writing was practised chiefly for the pleasure of the writer and his friends, and publication was secondary, and usually an afterthought.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Maybe it was withdrawn due to its Stratfordian fluff. LOL

End of page 171 and some of page 172:

https://archive.org/details/williamshakespea0000hami/page/171/mode/1up?q=inn

“The Comedy of Errors” belongs to this period of tentative work, and is interesting as showing Shakespeare’s familiarity with the traditional form of comedy and as marking the point of his departure from it. It was first published in the Folio of 1623, but it was presented as early as the Christ-mas season of 1594, in the hall of Gray’s Inn; and its production was accompanied by considerable disorder in the audience, which must have been composed chiefly of benchers and their guests. This disturbance is mentioned by.a chronicler in the same year in these words: “ After much sport, a Comedy of Errors was played by the players; so that night began and continued to the end, in nothing but confusion and errors; whereupon it was ever afterwards called the ‘Night of Errors.’” The main, although not the only, source of the plot was the Menzchmi of Plautus, in which the Latin comedian develops the almost unlimited possibility of blunders which lies in mistakes of identity — then as now a popular device with playwrights and storytellers. Shakespeare may have read the comedy in the original, or in a translation by William Warner, which was not published until the year following the presentation of the “ Comedy of Errors,” but which was probably in existence in manuscript much earlier. In this form many pieces of prose and verse which later became famous were passed from hand to hand; writing was practised chiefly for the pleasure of the writer and his friends, and publication was secondary, and usually an afterthought.

 

 

Crazy Law Students At It Again

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/old-new-london/vol2/pp553-576

 

In the same year, at Gray's Inn The Prince of Purpoole revel took place over several days and nights.

 

The Prince of Purpoole's revel at Gray's Inn, in 1594, was a costly entertainment, and, in point of riotous excess, not inferior to any similar festivity in the time of Elizabeth. "On the 20th of December (St. Thomas's Eve) the prince (one Master Henry Holmes, a Norfolk gentleman) took up his quarters in the Great Hall of the Inn, and by the 3rd of January the grandeur and comicality of his proceedings had created so much talk throughout the town, that the Lord Treasurer, Burghley, the Earls of Cumberland, Essex, Shrewsbury, and Westmoreland; the Lords Buckhurst, Windsor, Sheffield, Compton; and a magnificent array of knights and ladies, visited Gray's Inn Hall on that day, and saw the masque which the revellers put upon the stage. After the masque there was a banquet, which was followed by a ball. On the day after, the prince, attended by eighty gentlemen of Gray's Inn and the Temple (each of them wearing a plume on his head), dined in state with the Lord Mayor and aldermen of the City, at Crosby Place. The frolic continued for many days more, the royal Purpoole, on one occasion, visiting Blackwall with a splendid retinue; on another, (Twelfth Night) receiving a gallant assembly of lords, ladies, and knights at his court in Gray's Inn; and on a third (Shrovetide) visiting the Queen herself, at Greenwich, when Her Majesty warmly applauded the masque set before her by the actors who were members of the prince's court.

"So delighted was Elizabeth with the entertainment, that she graciously allowed the masquers to kiss her right hand, and loudly extolled Gray's Inn as 'an house she was much indebted to, for it did always study for some sport to present unto her;' whilst to the mock prince she showed her favour by placing in his hand the jewel (set with seventeen diamonds and fourteen rubies) which he had won by valour and skill in a tournament which formed part of the Shrovetide sports."

When the Prince of Purpoole kept his court at Gray's Inn on this occasion, we are told that his champion rode into the dining-hall upon the back of a fiery charger, which, like the rider, was clothed in a panoply of steel.

 

 

 

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