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The Feigned Death of Lord Bacon


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His Final Grand Drama: The Feigned Death of Francis Bacon at the House of the Future Grand Master of England the Earl of Arundel.

See:  DID FRANCIS BACON DIE IN 1626? OR DID HE FEIGN HIS DEATH

       WITH THE HELP OF HIS ROSICRUCIAN-FREEMASONRY BROTHERHOOD? https://sirbacon.org/a-phoenix/

 

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The alchemy works published under the pseudonym Eugenius Philalethes from 1649-55, usually attributed to Welsh clergyman Thomas Vaughan, can be dated to the time and appear to suggest Bacon faked his death and lived into his nineties. Aula Lucis, or the House of Light, 1652, can be safely attributed to the same author. 

1650: Anthroposophia Theomagica, Anima Magica Abscondita, Magia Adamica, Coelum Terrae

The Man-Mouse Taken in a Trap (a response to Cambridge Platonist Henry More, who had attacked Philalethes in a pamphlet)

1651: Lumen de Lumine: Or a New Magical Light, The Second Wash: Or the Moore scoured once more (another rejoinder to More)

1652: Aula Lucis, or The House of Light (“by S.N. a modern speculator”), The Fame and Confession of the Fraternity of R.C. (an English translation of the Rosicrucian manifestos, done by “an unknown hand”)

1655: Euphrates, or The Waters of the East

 

Aula Lucis:

It is my design to make over my reputation to a better age, for in this I would not enjoy it, because I know not any from whom I would receive it.

Bacon, last will:

For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, to foreign nations, and the next ages.

 

Aula Lucis:

future times, wearied with the vanities of the present, will perhaps seek after the truth and gladly entertain it. Thus you will see what readers I have predestined for myself

Bacon, Valerius Terminus:

publishing in a manner whereby it shall not be to the capacity nor taste of all, but shall as it were single out and adopt his reader, is not to be laid aside, both for the avoiding of abuse in the excluded, and the strengthening of affection in the admitted

 

Aula Lucis:

I could never affect anything that was barren, for sterility and love are inconsistent. Give me a knowledge that is fertile in performances, for theories without their effects are but nothings in the dress of things

Bacon, Valerius Terminus:

Knowledge that tendeth but to satisfaction is but as a courtesan, which is for pleasure and not for fruit or generation

Bacon, The Great Instauration:

That wisdom which we have derived principally from the Greeks is but like the boyhood of knowledge, and has the characteristic property of boys: it can talk, but it cannot generate; for it is fruitful of controversies but barren of works

 

Aula Lucis:

hence it is that I move in the sphere of generation and fall short of that test of Heraclitus: “Dry light is best soul”

Wisdom of the Ancients:

it was excellently said by Heraclitus, “A dry light makes the best soul”

Novum Organum:

the human understanding resembles not a dry light, but admits a tincture of the will and passions which generate their own system accordingly

Bacon, “Of Friendship”:

it is in truth of operation upon a man’s mind, of like virtue as the alchymists use to attribute to their stone for man’s body; that it worketh all contrary effects, but still to the good and benefit of nature. But yet without praying in aid of alchmyists, there is manifest image of this in the ordinary course of nature . . . Heraclitus saith well in one of his enigmas, “Dry light is ever the best.” And certain it is, that the light that a man receiveth by counsel from another, is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgment; which is ever infused and drenched in his affections and customs.  

 

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On 2/22/2022 at 11:24 AM, A Phoenix said:

Hi Ryan, great work. I have long suspected that some or all of the writings published in the name of Thomas Vaughan were written by Lord Bacon; and of course most importantly, the first English translation of the two Rosicrucian manifestos:  

 

The academics are insisting on Vaughan, I don't know when that attribution came in but they are just ignoring all the Baconian references. Henry Vaughan's verse might turn up interesting things, and there was another writer Eirenaeus Philalethes whose works started appearing soon after Thomas Vaughan's purported death. This subject, you pull a thread and find a whole new set of new threads...

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   In the months following Bacon’s supposed death to the world his private secretary and Rosicrucian Brother Dr Rawley compiled and published a commemorative work in his honour Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulumio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum, otherwise known as the Manes Verulamiani. This rare volume contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon with an introduction by Dr Rawley. The orthodox editors and biographers of Bacon have continued to suppress and pass over the contents of this critically important work to the present day. Several of these verses portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist of comedies and tragedies written under the pseudonym Shakespeare. As revealing as these remarkable verses already are in his address to the reader Dr Rawley plainly states that he had  deliberately withheld other verses from public view consistent with his later statement in the preface to the Resuscitatio in which he stated there are some things that are not openly ‘communicable to the Publick’:1

 What my Lord the right Honourable Viscount St. Alban valued most, that he should be dear to seats of learning and to men of letters, that (I believe) he has secured; since these tokens of love and memorials of sorrow prove how much his loss grieves their heart. And indeed with no stinted hand have the Muses bestowed on him this emblem (for very many poems, and the best too, I withhold from publication); but since he himself delighted not in quantity, no great quantity have I put forth. Moreover let it suffice to have laid, as it were, these foundations in the name of the present age; this fabric (I think) every age will embellish and enlarge; but to what age it is given to put the last touch, that is known to God only and the fates. 2

 It is obvious enough from the above statement that Rawley was privy to the secrets of the life of his Rosicrucian Master Lord Bacon and as can be seen from these verses alone that he knew he was the supreme poet and dramatist Shakespeare. In the verses and his subsequent first English Life of Lord Bacon he had in his own words laid the foundations and it would be for future generations to fill in the gaps and bring to light the secrets of his life and writings and of his feigned death by slow degree through hints, allusions, and coded information by his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, as stated on the title page of New Atlantis ‘Tempore Patet Occulta Veritas’ (In Time The Hidden Truth Will Be Revealed). Now while Dr Rawley and some of the writers of these verses could not openly state that Bacon had feigned his own death through pointed hints and double entendre, it seems at least some of them, were aware he was still alive.

  It was planned and put out that Bacon died on Easter Sunday, as Dr Rawley aware of its hidden significance put it, ‘then celebrated, for our Saviours Resurrection’.3 This being a patently clear reference to the fact that on Easter or Resurrection Sunday Jesus Christ rose from the dead, thus in other words, Bacon died to the profane world and metaphorically rose again, and rather than ascend to heaven, he secretly slipped away to live the rest of his life in secret and obscurity. In a memorial verse penned by his inward friend the metaphysical poet George Hebert, kinsman of William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke Grand Master of England and Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, to whom Bacon dedicated the Shakespeare First Folio, in an allusion to his feigned death writes ‘It is evident in April alone you could have died’.4 In the poetical words of the poet and dramatist Thomas Randolph ‘Thus the new-born-Phoenix regards the ashes from which it springs, and the bloom of youth returns to aged Aeson. So too, Verulam  restored, boasts its new walls, and thence hopes for its ancient renown.’5 The phoenix being the long-lived immortal bird, a symbol of renewal and rebirth, that rises from its ashes and is born again, one beloved by his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood. In what appears to be an allusion to the fact that Bacon was not buried in St Michael’s Church another anonymous author writes ‘Think you, foolish traveller, that the leader of the choir of the Muses and of Phoebus is interred in the cold marble? Away you are deceived.’6 And Henry Ockley, of Trinity College, Cambridge emphatically states:

 He is gone, he is gone: it suffices for my woe to have uttered this: I have not said he is dead.7

 In the Memoriae the poet and dramatist Thomas Randolph (one of the ‘sons’ of Ben Jonson) reveals that his close and inward friend Francis Bacon is Shakespeare:

When he perceived that the arts were held by no roots, and like seed scattered on the surface of the soil were withering away, he taught the Pegesean arts to grow, as grew the spear of Quirinus [Spear/Spearman: i.e., Shakespeare] swiftly into a laurel tree. Therefore since he has taught the Heliconian goddesses to flourish no lapse of ages shall dim his glory. The ardour of his noble heart could bear no longer that you, divine Minerva [Pallas Athena the Shaker of the Spear who wore a helmet which rendered her invisible] should be despised. His godlike pen restored your wonted honour and as another Apollo [leader of the Nine Muses presiding over the different kinds of poetry and liberal arts] dispelled the clouds that hid you. 8

In the Shakespeare First Folio in a verse entitled ‘To the memory of my beloued, The Avthor Mr. William Shakespeare: And what he has left vs’ Ben Jonson says of its secret concealed author:

                                                         Leaue thee alone, for the comparison

                                                        Of all, that insolent Greece, or haughtie Rome

                                                        sent forth, or since did from their ashes come. 9

In posthumously published meditations Ben Jonson describes his inward friend Francis Bacon whom he knows is our secret Shakespeare repeating the words in the Shakespeare First Folio:

He, who hath fill’d up all numbers; and perform’d that in our tongue, which may be compar’d, or preferr’d, either to insolent Greece, or haughty Rome. 10

The Shakespeare First Folio is dedicated to William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke (then Grand Master of England) and Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery. Their cousin George Herbert along with Ben Jonson assisted Lord Bacon while the First Folio was moving through the Jaggard printing-press in translating his Essays and De Augmentis. In the 1640 edition of the De Augmentis (The Advancement of Learning) immediately preceding seven verses from the Memoriae is a truly magnificent poem by George Herbert entitled ‘In Honour of the Illustrious Francis Bacon’ from which I quote a few lines:

                                                   At length, we ask him, “who art thou?”

                                                   For he walks not every day showing the same face.

                                                   Knowest thou not of Death?

                                                   Prince of Imagination or Ideas; High-priest of Truth.

                                                   Sole Priest of the World and Human Souls.11

Francis Bacon Founding Father of the Modern World along with his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood declared their divine objective to be the Universal Reformation of the Whole World for the betterment of humankind. Ben Jonson said of our Secret Shakespeare in the First Folio ‘He was not of an age, but for all time’. As long as time lasts Bacon-Shakespeare will forever be the High Priest of the World and never die-he lives and breaths among us-he is everywhere: we think his thoughts, we speak his language, and see the world through his all-knowing and seeing eyes. Lord Bacon, simply the greatest of all men.                                  

1. William Rawley, ed., Resuscitatio, Or, Bringing into Publick Light Severall Pieces, Of The

    Works, Civil, Historical, Philosophical, & Theological, Hitherto Sleeping; Of the Right

    Honourable Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam, Viscount Saint Alban. According to the best

    Corrected Coppies. Together, With his Lordships Life. By William Rawley, Doctor in

    Divinity, His Lordships First, and Last, Chapleine. Afterwards Chapleine, to His late

    Maiesty (London: printed by Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657), A1r.

2. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De

    Vervlamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis

    Haviland, 1626), A2r-v; W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The

    Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 38.

3. William Rawley, ed., Resuscitatio, Or, Bringing into Publick Light Severall Pieces, Of The

    Works, Civil, Historical, Philosophical, & Theological, Hitherto Sleeping; Of the Right

    Honourable Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam, Viscount Saint Alban. According to the best

    Corrected Coppies. Together, With his Lordships Life. By William Rawley, Doctor in

    Divinity, His Lordships First, and Last, Chapleine. Afterwards Chapleine, to His late     

    Maiesty (London: printed by Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657), last unnumbered page

    of his Life of Bacon.

4. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio,

    Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626), p. 2; W.

    G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 38.

5. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio,

    Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626), pp. 29-

    30; W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 47.

6. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio,

    Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626), p. 20; W.

    G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 44.

7. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio,

    Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626), pp. 25-6;

    W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 46.

8. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio,

    Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626), pp. 29-

    30; W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 47.

9. Francis Bacon, Shakespeares Comedies Histories, & Tragedies. Published according to the

    True Originals (London: printed by Isaac Jaggard, and Edward Blount, 1623), ‘To the memory

     of my beloued, The Avthor Mr. William Shakespeare: And what he has left vs’.

10. Ben Jonson, Timber or Discoveries (London: printed 1641), pp. 37-8.

11. Francis Bacon, Of The Advancement of Learning or the Partition of Sciences IX Bookes                                                       

Written in Latin by the Most Eminent Illustrious & Famous Lord Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam

Vicount of St Alban Counsilour of Estate and Lord Chancellor of England Interpreted by Gilbert Wats

(Oxford: printed by Leon. Lichfield. Printer to the University for Robert Young & Ed. Forrest, 1640),

B2r-v. For translation see Baconiana, January, 1898, pp. 39-40.

 

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Francis Bacon Founding Father of the Modern World along with his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood declared their divine objective to be the Universal Reformation of the Whole World for the betterment of humankind. Ben Jonson said of our Secret Shakespeare in the First Folio ‘He was not of an age, but for all time’. As long as time lasts Bacon-Shakespeare will forever be the High Priest of the World and never die-he lives and breaths among us-he is everywhere: we think his thoughts, we speak his language, and see the world through his all-knowing and seeing eyes. Lord Bacon, simply the greatest of all men.       

Lovely tribute ! ❤️

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Lovely tribute ! ❤️

A Phoenix, this is one of the most powerful articles I have ever seen on Bacon's supposed "death."

And posted on April 9, thank you so much!

In the past year or two, I went from an interested and intrigued Baconian who have heard that Bacon may have faked his death, with mixed opinions, to a Baconian who is convinced our Bacon lived on to continue his (our) work for many years later. Thanks mostly to you, A Phoenix.

Happy Francis Bacon second "Birthday"!

I've celebrated April 9 for well over 20 years, but now have a whole knew perspective on why it is a celebration. 😉

 

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OK, if "Days" can be "Years", then if Bacon was born in 1561 and he died in 1626, that would mean he was in his 17th day?

99-21=17.

Sonnet 17 says so much! ALL of the Sonnets tell Bacon's story! Everyone should learn to read what he says.

First 4 lines of Sonnet 17:

VVHo will beleeue my verse in time to come
If it were fild with your most high deserts?
Though yet heauen knowes it is but as a tombe
Which hides your life , and shewes not halfe your parts:

If Sonnet 17 is related to other 17s, and his rebirth, then Sonnet should tell a piece of Bacon's story.

Ignore the WIT and going up WTI, the words alone, from Bacon's heart and soul, say everything. He writes to himself a lot. He had THREE different names and history!!!

Bacon, Shake-speare, and Tudor.

I may be off a "Day" on the 17, and have to do some domestic stuff for now...

 

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Thank you-much appreciated.

A Phoenix,

Lawrence and I were so excited about your work long before this forum was even a seed in our brains.

There was a several year "quiet" time among Baconians and you broke the ice.

Thank you!! Just Know you broke the ice.

Now look at the water not only flowing, but bubbling over. A Baconian FLOOD is underway!

Thank you!!!!!!!!

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Hi Rob, Doubly Emotional. If we have made a small contribution to the great Baconian cause stretching back for more than 150 years we feel privileged and seriously humbled and to carry on this journey with yourself, Lawrence, Yann, Kate, and the other contributors to B'Hive, feels like a collective destiny we are so grateful to be part of.  

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Curious Day 49 in Sonnet 21 should be February 18. But read the lines:

With Sunne and Moone,with earth and seas rich gems:
With Aprills first borne flowers and all things rare,
That heauens ayre in this huge rondure hems,
O let me true in loue but truly write,

I love this, Bacon always sharing his heart. More I read his words, the closer we become.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Day049

 

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11 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Curious Day 49 in Sonnet 21 should be February 18. But read the lines:

With Sunne and Moone,with earth and seas rich gems:
With Aprills first borne flowers and all things rare,
That heauens ayre in this huge rondure hems,
O let me true in loue but truly write,

I love this, Bacon always sharing his heart. More I read his words, the closer we become.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Day049

 

Using your tool, I noticed that the 49th Sonnet by counting from the end was the Sonnet ... 106 !😃

image.png.68f85cde0a44c045bca8d81919f5e7da.png

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Do you hear Bacon?

"In praise of Ladies dead", written after Elizabeth passed?

"and louely Knights", Sir Francis Bacon?

Then this...

"Have eyes to wonder, but lack the tounges to praise."

Hmmmm, "eyes" and "tounges"? Plural. He was not alone?

 

 

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On 4/9/2022 at 1:53 PM, A Phoenix said:

‘Think you, foolish traveller, that the leader of the choir of the Muses and of Phoebus is interred in the cold marble? Away you are deceived.’6 And Henry Ockley, of Trinity College, Cambridge emphatically states:

 He is gone, he is gone: it suffices for my woe to have uttered this: I have not said he is dead.7

 

Sorry I have only just got to reading this. I totally agree, it's an incredibly powerful piece of writing on every level, AP.

I am so pleased that this forum was started up, as it's become more than obvious to me, since we became acquainted in 2021, that the time, effort and loving dedication you (and your partner) have put into researching the entire life and works of Fra. Bacon over the years deserves greater recognition. I hope what you posted and your longer paper on Academia.edu get shared far and wide. 

Great work!

Kate 

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Hi Kate, thank you for your generous and moving words which are very much appreciated. Since we became acquainted in 2021 it feels not only have I found a learned kindred spirit but also a valuable and much loved friend. But it is not only your learning that I admire, it is your impressive humility and sense of humour. Thank you. Much love Phoenix.

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April 9th, 1626, is the day that Sir Francis Bacon masterfully executed his exit from the public Stage. It is with Great Gratitude and Appreciation for the A. Phoenix team in bringing clarity that this day  Reveals and Conceals the  Great Intention and  Greater Purpose of an Extraordinary and Exceptional Man who took all knowledge to Be his Province for the Relief of Man's Estate and Betterment of Mankind.

 

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Francis Bacon was born to be King of England.

SirBacon.org is the King of Baconian websites.

Lawrence Gerald is King of SirBacon.org.

lawrence.jpg.5861f037916f8dff231d5c8fe49e77c8.jpg
Lawrence, the King of Bacon, about 25 years ago.

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Baconian history...

I remember Lawrence telling me the story of that OJ trial image. This morning I kind of remembered, but not enough to share. But remember the time frame, when we first met.

Shortly (weeks maybe) after that I was with King Lawrence and his Photoshop guy (Gary?) in his home while we played with this historic image on the early SirBacon.org website in late 1997 or very early 1998:

beachcycle.jpg.8b83ab9ed9c5cce8b3fc5f13be03a865.jpg

It was my intro to Photoshop, I was using Corel Draw at the time which was much cheaper, and I was blown away. One of my next clients brought me into Photoshop and Illustrator and I used her software. Changed my life almost as much as Lawrence did introducing me to Bacon.

I remember Gary (if that was his name) adding a spaceship as Lawrence and I laughed and encouraged him to do. Then I watch amazed as he did it, using layers. Lawrence was using Claris for his web development at the time, before Google, and Dreamweaver was only for high dollar pros if I remember right, out of all of our budgets. Netscape was the main browser, AltaVista was the most popular search engine. AOL was still sending CD Roms to people to sign up, but they were never a huge market share.

Bandwidth was at either 128K, or 256K download if you paid more. (Imagine that!!) I have 500MB and get frustrated sometimes!

It was fun, Gary would do a graphic, Lawrence would open Claris, and I being the techy, would assist from side while Lawrence clicked the buttons on his MAC, "File > Open,..."

That short phrase became something that he and I shared in emails and letters for a few years, starting out, "File > Open..."

What fun!

Lawrence had another name at the time, "Mr. Synchronicity." Well deserved I will validate. My eyes had been open to synchronicity for some years as well. When we were together we'd share the syncronicities of the day, usually Bacon related, but we had other interests as well. Magic galore!

I put his 1996 photo up today for fun. Synchronicity kicked in. I had to pick up my wife at work and take her to a DR appointment. Nearly every song that came on my XM Radio was from the SF Bay "Summer of Love" era. King Gerald was there.

My wife and I grabbed a quick lunch on the way home and a baseball game was on. They showed the Bay Bridge from Oakland to San Francisco and I remembered being with Lawrence and Peter Dawkins in 1998 going across that bridge as we got the Royal tour of the Bay Area (synchronicity). I think we had sushi in SF, definitely saw the Golden Gate Bridge, Twin Peaks, all the best "inside views", and they talked about the Strats we were concerned about and the future of the Baconian movement while I was in the backseat totally engrossed on every Baconian word. DeVere never came up. 😉

All these years later, our friendship has grown. Granted, Lawrence is not a cipher/number guy, he is more grounded on facts, proven evidence, yet here we are today with this forum. Thank you, Mr. Synchronicity for allowing us to be free to explore on your King of Baconian websites. We LOVE you so much!!

An old image on my PC to reach back and touch Lawrence's heart from the past, Francis Carr:

fcarr.gif.5a0289c60f93a02bc6d80d6ed277e2f3.gif

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