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Advertisements from Parnassus


Guest Ryan Murtha

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Hi Ryan,

This is an English translation from the Italian of the 77th Advertisement in Ragguagli di Parnasso originally published at Venice in 1612 in the name Trajano Boccalini who died the following year in 1613. It was printed in German as The Universal Reformation of the Whole World in the booklet or pamphlet containing the first anonymous Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis (written by Bacon) published at Cassel in 1614. It is account of how Apollo (repeatedly likened to Lord Bacon in the Memoriae containing 32 verses conveying that he was the secret poet and dramatist Shakespeare) sets his sights on a general reformation of the world. 

The first English translation of Ragguagli di Parnasso (Advertisements from Parnassus) was issued in the name of one Henry, Earl of Monmouth under the title I Ragguagli di Parnasso: or Advertisements from Parnassus in Two Centuries (London:  printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1657). The inside page of the volume carries a portrait of 'Monmouth'. This instructive frontispiece is deliberately cut backwards so the motto around the portrait can only be read correctly by holding the page up to the light and looking through the paper which reveals (as is its purpose) a watermark in the shape of a vase. Within the vase there are three letters. The upper letter is B and the two letters below it are RC which presumably stands for Bacon of the Rosy Cross. In the same year Dr Rawley edited and published the Resuscitatio (London: printed by Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657) containing the first English Life of Lord Bacon. If the null '6' is dropped from the date 1657 it leaves 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher.

A second translation of the tract appeared in the name of N. N. Esquire entitled Advertisements From Parnassus....Newly done into English, and adapted to the Present Times (London: 1704). The unidentified (as far as I am aware) N. N. Esquire freely departed from the more literal translation of 1657. In the original English translation Jacobi Malloni de Casena is secretary to the congregation, that is secretary to Apollo, whereas in the 1704 version, N. N. Esquire in lifting the veil a little, makes Lord Bacon secretary to Apollo 'in honour of the English philosophers, he made Sir Francis Bacon Secretary to the Society' (pp. 27-8). 

Francis Bacon, Founder of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood and anonymous author of its two Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama Fraternitatis and the Confessio Fraternitatis and the Ragguagli di Parnasso or the Universal Reformation of the Whole World for which the invisible Brotherhood have been working in secret for the last four hundred years. 

 

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I was under impression that John Florio did the translation from Italian to English before 1625 when it is referred to in the Golden Fleece published in 1625.

The Golden Fleece is a first hand account of the settling of the new world by pilgrims associated with Bacon when he was secretary of state 

Google golden fleece by William Vaughan.

The publisher of Golden Fleece Francis Williams held publishing rights for Shakespeare's Rape of lucrece.

 

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THE PART TRANSLATION OF RAGGUAGLI DI PARNASSO.

When Queen Anne died in 1619 Florio lost his position at court and spent his last years with his new wife living in poverty at Fleet Street in Fulham. From his house in Fulham Florio worked on the third edition of his dictionary published many years after his death and also translated into English parts of Traiano Boccalini’s Ragguagli di Parnaso published by William Vaughan under the title of The New-found Politicke in 1626. In his final years at Fulham his private and literary relationship with Bacon which began decades before continued to the end of his days.  In the collection of Pembroke Papers at the British Library published by the Historical Manuscripts Commission Pott discovered documents ‘which prove that John Florio was among the “able pens” who aided Bacon in the production of his voluminous works.’1 In a letter to Mons. Jurnall Florio states by order of King James he has ‘translated the Kings works and printed some of them beyond the seas. Also Sir Philip Sidney’s Arcadia, and some of Lord Bacons writings.’ A petition dated 1621 presented by Mons. Jurnall to ‘the Duke’ (probably Buckingham) relates that James promised Florio an annuity of £50 as interpreter of foreign languages, and translator ‘not only of his Majestys works, but of Arcadia and the whole of the works of Visct. St Albans.’2 It remains to be seen wrote Pott ‘under what names the books were published which Florio translated and published abroad’,3 which she supposed were translated into French and Italian.4 And writes Reed ‘in some of the Pembroke MSS he [Florio] figures as a member, with Herbert, Hobbes, and Jonson, of Bacon’s literary bureau at Gorhambury.’5 It was in this period that Florio along with William Vaughan and one unnamed other partly translated the historically important The New found-Politicke published the year after his death.

The very existence of this rare, overlooked, and little known work was first pointed out to the English speaking world for the first time in a brief notice in the journal of Modern Language Notes by M. W. Croll in 1919 ‘I have’ he writes, ‘happened upon an apparently unrecorded work by John Florio’ published by William Vaughan in 1626 adding the work ‘is not mentioned by Sidney Lee in the DNB., or in any other bibliography that I have consulted.’6 In his article ‘The First English Translators of Trajano Boccalini’s Ragguagli di Parnaso: A Study of Literary Relationships’ William F. Marquardt remarked ‘The influence of Bocallini’s Ragguagli di Parnaso in England during the seventeenth and eighteenth has received almost no attention in the histories of English literature’ and there has been no ‘complete account of the first attempts to adapt the Ragguagli to the tastes of English readers’ in the anonymous tract Newes from Pernassus (1622) and The New-found Politicke.7

The original work issued in the name of Traiano Boccalini is divided into three parts or three centuries with the ‘centuria prima’ published in 1612, the ‘seconda centuria’ 1613 and the ‘Pietra del Paragone Politico’ 1615, which formed part of the Ragguagli in later editions. Similarly The New-found Politicke is divided into three parts and in his dedication to Charles I Vaughan informs the work is translated by three different hands, by himself, Florio, and one other, who he deliberately chooses not to name:

The First was translated by M. Florio, sometime Seruant to your Royall Mother of blessed memory. The Second by one, vnto whom the common wealth cannot not yet be beholding for his name; And the Third part by me, although farre inferiour vnto either of them for any knowledge which I dare arrogate to my selfe in the Italian Tongue, hauing discontinued the vse thereof since my returne out of Italie, being aboue 24. yeeres past, vntill this present time. 8  

The three centuries of the Ragguagli di Parnasso contains two hundred and ninety-six chapters and the New-found Politicke fifty-eight. The English translation of the New-found Politicke does not correspond with the three divisions in the Ragguagli nor does the order or sequence of the chapters in the former correspond to the original. The first part of the translation for which Florio is credited contains chapters from all three parts of the Boccalini original; eight from the first part of the Ragguagli, twelve from the second, and eight from the third. The second part by the unnamed translator are all taken from the third century of Ragguagli and the third part translated by Vaughan, all the chapters except two are taken from the first part of the original.9 It is clear that the two named translators Vaughan and Florio were on intimate terms and had long moved in the same circles. In The Golden Fleece which is modelled on the Raggluagli published in 1626 Vaughan mentions Florio on several occasions and also introduces him into an imaginary conversation between Vaughan, Florio and Robert Burton.10 It is almost entirely on this basis that Burton (a literary mask for Bacon) has been put forward as a candidate for the unnamed translator of The New-found Politicke and to the present day the identity of the anonymous translator who could not be named has never been satisfactorily determined. As with his secret concealed authorship of the Shakespeare works, the author to whom the Commonwealth cannot yet be beholding for his name, is the one and only, Francis Bacon.  

     1. C. M. Pott, ‘Michel De Montaigne; His Autobiography Compared With Francis

        Bacon’, Baconiana (London: printed by Robert Banks and Son), vol. IV, New

        Series, April 1896, no 14, p. 61.

    2. Government Commission Historical MSS., vol. 10, xiv, pp. 276-7 cited in C. M.

        Pott, ‘Michel De Montaigne; His Autobiography Compared With Francis

        Bacon’, Baconiana, (London: printed by Robert Banks and Son), vol. IV, New

        Series, April 1896, no 14, p. 61.

    3. Ibid., p. 61.

    4. C. M. Pott in Francis Bacon and his Secret Society An Attempt to Collect and

        Unite the Lost Links of a Long and Strong Chain (Chicago: Francis J. Schulte &

        Company, 1891) p. 43; C. M. Pott, Francis Bacon and his Secret Society An

        Attempt to Collect and Unite the Lost  Links of a Long and Strong Chain Second

        and Revised Edition (London: Robert Banks & Son, 1911), pp. 40-1. I have not

        seen the Pembroke Papers nor am I aware which Bacon works Florio translated

        presuming he did so, and none have surfaced with his name to them.

    5. Edwin Reed, Bacon vs. Shakspere (Boston: Joseph Knight Company, 1897), pp.

        85-6. The substance of Pott and Reed is repeated by Bertram G. Theobald in

        Enter Francis Bacon (London: Cecil Palmer, 1932), p. 25.

    6. Morris W. Croll, ‘John Florio’, Modern Language Notes, vol. XXXIV (1919), p.

        376. He was however anticipated by Rudolf Brotanek ‘Trajono Boccalinis

        Einfuss auf die englische Literatur’, Archiv fur das Stadium der neueren

        Sprachen und Literaturen, CXI (1903), pp. 405-14, at p. 411, as pointed out by

        William F. Marquardt, ‘The First English Translators of Trajano Boccalini’s

        Ragguagli di Parnaso: A Study of Literary Relationships’, The Huntington

        Library Quarterly, Vol. XV, (1951-2), p. 3 n1.

   7.  William F. Marquardt, ‘The First English Translators of Trajano Boccalini’s

         Ragguagli di Parnaso: A Study of Literary Relationships’, The Huntington

         Library Quarterly, Vol. XV, (1951-2), pp. 1-2.

    8. William Vaughan, The Nevv-found Politicke. Disclosing The Secret Natvres and

        dispositions as well of priuate persons as of Statesmen and Courtiers; wherein

        the Gouernments, Greatnesse, and Power of the most notable Kingdomes and

        Common-wealths of the world are discouered and censured. Together with Many

        Excellent Caueats and Rules fit to be obserued by those Princes and States of

        Christendome, both Protestants and Papists, which haue reason to distrust the

        designes of the King of Spain, as by the speech of the Duke of Hernia, vttered in

        the Counsell of Spaine, and hereto answered, may appeare. Written in Italian By

        Traiano Boccalini Gentleman of Rome, and priuiledged by sundry Princes of

        Italy, and also out of Italy by the most Christian King. And now translated in

        English for the benefit of this kingdome (London: printed for Francis Williams,

        1626), A2r.

    9. Frances A. Yates, John Florio The Life of an Italian in Shakespeares England

        (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1934), p. 302.

  10. Vaughan, The Golden Fleece Diuided into three Parts, Vnder which are

        discouered the Errours of Religion, the Vices and Decayes of the Kingdome, and

        lastly the wayes to get wealth, and to restore Trading so much complained of

        Transported From Cambrioll Colchos, out of the Southermost Part of the Iland,

        commonly called the Newfovndland. By Orpheus Iunior, For the generall and

        perpetuall Good of Great Britaine (London: printed for Francis Williams, 1626),

        Part I, p. 26; Frances A. Yates, John Florio The Life of an Italian in

        Shakespeares England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1934), pp. 85-

        6. In addition to the conversation between Vaughan, Florio and Burton Dr Yates

        also discusses other mentions by Vaughan of Florio on p. 264 and his appearance

        before the imaginary court of Apollo on pp. 260-4.

 

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Thank you for your informed response.

I was under the impression that Florio also supplied translation of Bruno slings and arrows speech that inspired Shakespeare's Hamlet soliloquy.

The publisher of the Golden Fleece Francis Williams held the rights to Shakespeare's Rape of Lucrece.

The early NH colonizers have connections to Shakespeare and Bacon.

Thank you again 

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Michael Callis mentioned:

Quote

The early NH colonizers have connections to Shakespeare and Bacon.

I know Virginia a little, a tiny bit about Vermont.

But I'm at a loss for the most part on NH. Is there a quick intro to some names and places I can look?

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The connection to Shakespeare and Bacon and NH is my research over several decades.

I was only interested in doing research on the early colonizers of NH and connections to Shakespeare circle become apparent and of course Bacon was involved before 1623 in colonizing.

Darby Field mentioned in Winthrops journal for climbing Mt. Washington is related to Nathan Field who took Shakespeare place on stage and wrote an actors remonstrance. 

Capt. John Underhill who signed indian  treaties with Field is related to Hercules Underhill who was awarded settlement as for sale of New Place to Shakespeare.

Both are related to Bishops.

Francis Williams has many connections.

He was the publisher for The Golden Fleece and held the rights to rape of lucrece from 1625-1630.

I believe the Francis Williams who wrote a letter to Winthrop declining an invitation to continue his position of authority.

The letter has a quote from King Lear and many phrases from owen Feltham book on morals.

I notice you use the eye of providence and triangle found on our Currency.

I am giving a presentation on us currency 1776-1785.

The eye of providence and definition is found in History of the world by Sir Walter Raleigh.

The triangle is from John Dee .

But what I discovered is the fugio paper denominational dollar designed by Franklin is a triangle (sun dial) in a circle in a square.

It echoes Atalanta Fugiens' emblems by Michael Mair .

Franklin goes to France and becomes master warden for the nine sisters lodge.

I show a medal owned by the American philosophical society dated 1829 a tribute to Franklin showing a triangle of Jehovah in a circle in a square.

I am working on PowerPoint presentation now and just got permission from American philosophical society to use image.

The 1783 Triumpho and Nova Constellatio carry on the tribute to the lodge of nine sisters credited with helping finance revolution. 

The 1776 Fugio was of little value because of being undermined by British counterfeit.

The presentation is August 10 at the Conway library in Conway NH.

Would appreciate any feedback.

Thank you 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Michael,

You might find some useful general background information in my paper The Fraudulent Friedmans (pp. 172-80) and some of the posts I have placed here on B'Hive under the heading Francis Bacon and the United States of America.

Edited by A Phoenix
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7 hours ago, Michael Callis said:

The connection to Shakespeare and Bacon and NH is my research over several decades.

I was only interested in doing research on the early colonizers of NH and connections to Shakespeare circle become apparent and of course Bacon was involved before 1623 in colonizing.

Darby Field mentioned in Winthrops journal for climbing Mt. Washington is related to Nathan Field who took Shakespeare place on stage and wrote an actors remonstrance. 

Capt. John Underhill who signed indian  treaties with Field is related to Hercules Underhill who was awarded settlement as for sale of New Place to Shakespeare.

Both are related to Bishops.

Francis Williams has many connections.

He was the publisher for The Golden Fleece and held the rights to rape of lucrece from 1625-1630.

I believe the Francis Williams who wrote a letter to Winthrop declining an invitation to continue his position of authority.

The letter has a quote from King Lear and many phrases from owen Feltham book on morals.

I notice you use the eye of providence and triangle found on our Currency.

I am giving a presentation on us currency 1776-1785.

The eye of providence and definition is found in History of the world by Sir Walter Raleigh.

The triangle is from John Dee .

But what I discovered is the fugio paper denominational dollar designed by Franklin is a triangle (sun dial) in a circle in a square.

It echoes Atalanta Fugiens' emblems by Michael Mair .

Franklin goes to France and becomes master warden for the nine sisters lodge.

I show a medal owned by the American philosophical society dated 1829 a tribute to Franklin showing a triangle of Jehovah in a circle in a square.

I am working on PowerPoint presentation now and just got permission from American philosophical society to use image.

The 1783 Triumpho and Nova Constellatio carry on the tribute to the lodge of nine sisters credited with helping finance revolution. 

The 1776 Fugio was of little value because of being undermined by British counterfeit.

The presentation is August 10 at the Conway library in Conway NH.

Would appreciate any feedback.

Thank you 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Michael, As well as AP’s papers I have a whole chapter on the USA and Washington DC (includes dollar bills) that you may find interesting at The-Secret-Work.com. It’s available as a flip book or to download as a PDF 

Here’s a screenshot of just two of the pages that cover money. You’ll have to zoom in to read. It carries over from the previous page so the reference to 153 won’t make sense but I can’t post them all as it’s on sale not free (£9 for 366 pages).

2430B908-6A76-4656-ABB0-91A6C4B061BD.jpeg.7fe2e5ae4af8fb5171a9a0ab8afa3ad9.jpeg
7A0D8DA2-237A-4114-AB9E-A0DB85AAE476.jpeg.2bc27dc660c262ae18c6f198f794eda2.jpeg

 

 

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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Michael:

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The presentation is August 10 at the Conway library in Conway NH.

Is it available online? If not, will you record it?

I see this that sounds fascinating:

https://conwaypubliclibrary.org/adult/events/288483/nh-1776-liberty-coin-and-seal-us

 

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Hi Michael, I would strongly recommend a read of Kate's book-see review below:

Review - The Secret Work of an Age

This work takes the reader on an unforgettable journey through the history, ideas and themes of the wisdom tradition from the mists of time throughout the ages to the present day. The extraordinary breadth and depth of it is based and erected upon the solid foundation of meticulous and extensive research with supporting links provided on all the principle subjects covered in it.

It especially takes account of the known times of the Sumerians, Egyptians, the major continents of East and West, including in depth explorations of the arcane knowledge, wisdom and teachings of various secret societies, in particular, the Knights Templar, and the Rosicrucian and Freemasonry Brotherhoods.

At the head and heart of the seventeenth-century Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood stood the towering genius of its age Francis Bacon (concealed author of the Shakespeare works), the Founding Father of the Modern World, whose secret order founded the United States of America, here explored and explained with impressive penetration and insight.  

The secrets of these societies veiled in allegory, metaphor and symbolism, impenetrable to the profane and uninitiated, are teased out and explained by its author with remarkable and compelling clarity revealing what has been hidden and concealed from us in some instances for hundreds and thousands of years.  

It also displays a masterful grasp of the magic and mathematical qualities of numbers, geometry and trigonometry and their hidden significance and meaning found everywhere in the everyday world all around us.

Through its central esoteric theme As Above So Below it explores the nexus of the microcosm of man and the macrocosm of the universe and the cosmic laws that underpin and sustain human  existence.

In doing so it takes us on a fascinating and illuminating journey of the astrological/astronomical cosmos and its ages up to the current developing Age of Aquarius: one of Peace, Love and Light marked by the further revealing of long hidden secrets, the raising of the collective consciousness of man, and the eventual Universal Reformation of the Whole World, providing a unique opportunity for the fulfilment of humankind’s divine and ordained destiny. 

This book is a must read for all those who wish to possess a deeper understanding of who we are, where we came from, and the future direction of humanity, which will forever change the way we see the  world and our unique place in it.

A Phoenix.

https://www.the-secret-work.com/store/p2/The_Secret_Work_of_an_Age_ebook.html

 

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Unfortunately  I just found out should be read as I need to secure the source.

The records state the stars represent a new constellation and there is no direct mention of Orpheus in the records.

There is a war ship named Orpheus but the story about the stars being in honor of the lyre of Orpheus is not.

There is another book on the flag written in 1853 that illustrated a flag with a lyre surrounded by thirteen stars associated with the writings and description of John Adams and a passport he designed after 1820.

I need to do more research

Thank you for asking for documentation.

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