Jump to content

The Alchemical Quest


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)
On 5/1/2024 at 6:04 AM, Marvin Haines said:

God, I'd heard of the Bilateral Cypher before, but I never really delved into it, as it looked too complicated. Now I can see how simple it is!

It appears that, when given five spaces - or "slots" - and instructed to fill them with only the letters A and B, there are exactly 22 distinct outcomes. I'll have to familiarize myself with this! 

Hi Marvin, Did you know the Biliteral (not bilateral by the way, it was originally called Biliterarie) cipher is two of absolutely anything. The first one being designated A the second B, so (apologies if you already know this, but it may be of interest to readers who land here from outside) it’s not just numbers or letters drawn slightly differently or in darker and lighter font (ie a biformed alphabet). There is a famous picture of people (cryptographers) looking in two different directions which translates to Knowledge is Power and also from the Riverbank publications (available to view on the gorhambury.org site and 4in1.ws) comes this and many more examples of its use:

IMG_2299.jpeg.4f3da99ea0bd443372306d172a4f161e.jpeg

You can use two different size of bricks, two different shapes of trumpets, people with eyes shut and open  - absolutely anything can be used to represent an a and b, including leaf shapes; hence the ‘’how to make anything signify anything’ phrase. It’s ingenious.

I’m intrigued why you said 22 though? Can you elaborate? Was it a typo and you meant 24 or am I missing something? 

Also what I don’t understand, (if someone could enlighten me?) is how it’s used as mentioned here in Cartier’s book? Or is this a completely separate Vigenere cipher where you move letters? IMG_2401.jpeg.e58d6b9644ab89d2b97a2626e3d646ac.jpeg

Rob (I think?) posted this the other day too and I took a screenshot, 

IMG_2315.jpeg.60a0c3ad6765d276078287301aec9cc5.jpeg

while this is an interesting idea this couldn’t be called a biliteral cipher, as it’s not following Bacon’s system.

 It’s always been my belief that where you see a TT it’s pointing us to look twice at that page and the To and Two within the To The Reader by BI at the front of the First Folio is the main ‘key’ instructing to look for the duality within the book. Another obvious hint to duality on those two pages is the two faces of Shakespeare ie the Droeshout mask picture “hiding” the second face.  That’s not a biliteral cipher in itself but a good way to say to readers, hey this is what we’ve used in what follows.

Edited by Kate
Biliterie to Biliterarie (Bacon’s old English)
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
  • Wow! 1

 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Thank you for the The Alchemical Quest. 🙂

I'd like to share a little of my exploration. I think I've mentioned a couple tidbits or so of what I thought might be intentional already. But the exploration itself is a major part of what we do as self-proclaimed Baconian cryptologists and I want to share some of that. I'll write it to the curious who may get the bug to explore.

Part 1: Introduction

Allisnum2er (Yann) posted the The Alchemical Quest puzzle that begins this thread.

Yann is known to not only see connections with cipher hints, he can weave a cipher masterpiece as well as anybody I know today. One of his skills is with Bacon's own cipher which has been a main discussion theme here on the B'Hive for a while.

I'm pleased that he did not share his cipher in text. It was embedded in an image. Yes I am aware there are OCR and AI apps and tools to read text quickly in an image, but I took the time to type every word. That was important in my own exploration. Remember, just because you can take a shortcut does not mean you'll get to the goal quicker.

image.png.9eb0b38a638c6397a02920559c70fe5f.png

 

Part 2: Exploration

As you see, I made the italic words bold. That's because my eye sight is not like it was 20 years ago. I need extra visual enhancements! 🙂

I typically start with counts. They may be word counts, letter counts, line counts, whatever. I'm a number guy mostly. And there are great number winks in this work.

Certainly a significant number of B'Hive members noticed the potential biliteral cipher with the italic words when being italic might not make sense on some of those words. LOL

The first biliteral letter would be made of the first five words. Right? Bacon's biliteral cipher has five places.

Through skies of ethereal dreams

Italic, three non-italic, and an italic word. I see 1 0 0 0 1, but that is because I am number and computer nerd who gets binary code. I see ones and zeros. But Bacon demonstrated with a's and b's. So the above could be either a b b b a (P) or b a a a b (S).

Those five words represent a "P" or an "S" and an italic word could be an "a" or a "b".

Next five words:

I soar, Seeking Wisdom in

0 1 0 0 0, or a b a a a (I,J), or maybe b a b b b (Z).

Now we have four possible letters. The first five words are either a P or S. The second five words make either an I/J or a Z. As far as making any sense, even at this early stage is that the Z is not right. So by elimination we end up an S and I/J.

Next five words:

every wave’s roar, Enthralled by

1 0 0 0 0, or b a a a a (R).

OK, now I get confused, what is "S I/J R"?

After the next letter, "F", the rest came very easy. The end has me curious. I can make up my own interpretation easy enough, simple hillbilly cipher solution type stuff. But who can really see into Yann's world? There is a letter at the end to be seen, I just can't give it up myself. And I am sure there is more for me to explore.

image.png.f46718184262560eb5f23b9c0c99fc3b.png

Just for fun, anyone who can tell me where the biliteral key that I use came from gets a big ol' smile from me. 🙂

image.png.75ce2006c17ef5a4aca6dd674785d8bb.png

MANY THANKS ROB !!! 

Thanks for your support , thanks again for playing this game, and thanks for this great presentation of the message that I concealed using Bacon's own cipher. 

You are right. There is a last letter ! 😊

Following your decipherment it would be :

Endlessly seeking the elixir of

AABBA

G

It was tempting, but I chose :

Endlessly seeking the elixir of

AABBB

H

The message is : SIR FRANCIS BACON - H

This is a reference to the Work of T.D. Bokkenham https://sirbacon.org/gallery/west.htm

And this is also a reference to my own work and research that I shared on this forum.

This Poem is a tribute to Francis Bacon and Ben Jonson.

And I think that Ben Jonson left a clue in "The English Grammar" published posthumously in 1640.

image.png.3f89b91d709dcdaa8173850a57ed47d6.png

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n599/mode/2up 

And though I dare not say, she is, (as I have heard one call her) the Queene mother of Consonants: yet she is the life, and quickening of them.

For good measure, in order to end the "Biliteral" part of my poem, I also used Bacon's cipher at the end.

Lege, Relege ...

AABAB , AAAAB

F.        B.

 "Just for fun, anyone who can tell me where the biliteral key that I use came from gets a big ol' smile from me. 🙂"

I love your Bookmark !

Thanks to SirBacon.org, I guess, that it comes from an autographed book by Peter Pesic. Am I right ? 🙂 

https://sirbacon.org/pesic.htm

 

 

  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

It was tempting, but I chose :

Endlessly seeking the elixir of

AABBB

H

The message is : SIR FRANCIS BACON - H

Oh yes! I missed the italic "of"! I knew I would get something wrong retyping the poem! LOL

I like H better. Remember that H = F + B (8 = 6 + 2). With my Sonnets Dedication poem solution the rearranged poem ends in the center of the star with H which to me is FB to make it W. Mr. FB or Worshipful Master Francis Bacon. 😉

1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

I love your Bookmark !

Thanks to SirBacon.org, I guess, that it comes from an autographed book by Peter Pesic. Am I right ? 🙂 

https://sirbacon.org/pesic.htm

I believe it came with The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined by the Friedmans. Its a tear off book-marker. But now I don't see where it was tore off so I may not be correct.

  • Like 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

image.png.37a97c09de471e98b47302834537a3bb.png

For me, 84 is the simple cipher of ELIZABETH and the pages 84 of the First Folio are important.

image.png.0f46a41383ebdaaf5951b02449aba5ef.png

PRINCE FRANCIS BACON, A LORD, A LAWYER, A PHILOSOPHER, A KNIGHT ... A SPIRIT !

 

I saw the 84 and of course ELIZABETH was there for me. I also played with 83 which is TRUTH. But 84 was a count for sure

Line 84 of the Sonnets which is the last line of Sonnet 6:

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet084

To be deaths conquest and make wormes thine heire.

On Line 84 Bacon leaves a final message to his mother, ELIZABETH.

Day 84 in the Sonnets Design? The bold lines are the ones that begin in Day 84 in Sonnet 36:

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Day084

LEt me confesse that we two must be twaine,
Although our vndeuided loues are one:
So shall those blots that do with me remaine,
Without thy helpe , by me be borne alone.
In our two loues there is but one respect,
Though in our liues a seperable spight,
Which though it alter not loues sole effect,
Yet doth it steale sweet houres from loues delight,

I may not euer-more acknowledge thee,
Least my bewailed guilt should do thee shame,
Nor thou with publike kindnesse honour me,
Vnlesse thou take that honour from thy name:
   But doe not so,I loue thee in such sort,
   As thou being mine,mine is thy good report.

Sir Bacon, I so feel your emotion in what you said to your mother. I get it! You say it so clearly!

The "two" are the Queen, Elizabeth, and her son who should was a secret Prince and then should have been the next Tudor King of England, Bacon. He wrote the above to be in Day 84 to speak directly to/about her and tell us his history.

How about Sonnet 84?

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet084

WHo is it that sayes most,which can say more,
Then this rich praise,that you alone,are you,
In whose confine immured is the store,
Which should example where your equall grew,
Leane penurie within that Pen doth dwell,
That to his subiect lends not some small glory,
But he that writes of you,if he can tell,
That you are you,so dignifies his story.
Let him but coppy what in you is writ,
Not making worse what nature made so cleere,
And such a counter-part shall fame his wit,
Making his stile admired euery where.
    You to your beautious blessings adde a curse,
    Being fond on praise,which makes your praises worse.

 

The entire Sonnet is Bacon speaking to Elizabeth. Who is it that can say most? Bacon, as Shakespeare writing these Sonnets says it all. Sharing their secrets while letting us know how he begged for her to allow him to coppy himself.

Sonnet 84, of course, that is ELIZABETH? Who else is this Sonnet about?

"But he that writes of you,if he can tell, That you are you,so dignifies his story. Let him but coppy what in you is writ,"

This Sonnet is Sealed as well. Add up the first letters of the 14 lines, WTIWLTBTLNAMYB you have 183 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher.

287 we know is a Seal number, and ONE EIGHTY THREE is 157 Simple cipher for the other Seal number. So Sonnet 84 is Sealed.

Another Sonnet that is Sealed is Sonnet 11. It is the last Sonnet of the first Tier and the first 14 letters AIATHWIALHLWST add up to 157 Simple cipher.

Curious the last two lines from another Sonnet with Bacon speaking to Elizabeth his mother and with these two lines:

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet011

She caru'd thee for her seale,and ment therby,
Thou shouldst print more,not let that coppy die.

 

Yann, I greatly underestimated your emphasis on Elizabeth in your poem. Obviously I am a little off my game. 😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Wow! 1

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  As mentioned, the Bank permanently burns their official corporate name onto the clear lacquered wood (probably Maple) of their complementary 18-inch Rulers here, a sly covert advertising campaign...which could have residual value stretching into Decades.

   But I often wonder, what else do they use that Corporate branding iron of theirs on? 

   The employees?

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I saw the 84 and of course ELIZABETH was there for me. I also played with 83 which is TRUTH. But 84 was a count for sure

Hi Rob,

Thank you for sharing your thoughts on number 84 !🙏

And you were right to play with number 83 (TRUTH) as well as about the emphasis on Elizabeth in my poem. 🙂 

I chose to construct my poem with 81 words.

image.png.b8ee3b68539bdcea2c3199ffd872dc97.png

I used bold letters for the number XXVII.

27 is 3^3

And 3 x 27 = 81

The words 27 , 54 (2x27) and 81 (3x27) hide the following message :

ONE PHILOSOPHER : BACON

Francis Bacon mentions the Alchymists in the Chapter XXVII  ( Of Frenship) of his Essays.

image.png.ae9fb10f881389b59f245105cb57b4a7.png

And if I had a Sonnet in my mind when I wrote my poem it was Sonnet 81 !

image.png.cc5e4bc6007326d78b2df399d72afcb6.png

Keep in mind that 81 is also 9 x 9

And the 9x9 magic square is the square of ... the Moon ! 😉 

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44451/cynthias-revels-queen-and-huntress-chaste-and-fair

  • Wow! 3

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Hi Allisnum2er

Thank you for introducing me to Sonnet 81. I'm a late-comer to the Sonnets. This one seems very special. Am I on the right track in interpreting the poem as the author (i.e. Bacon) talking to his works (e.g. the plays under the name of Shakespeare)? "Your monument shall be my gentle verse"; "You still shall live (such virtue hath my Pen)"... etc.

Sir Ian McKellen's recitation of the sonnet: 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/4/2024 at 4:04 PM, Eric Roberts said:

This one seems very special. Am I on the right track in interpreting the poem as the author (i.e. Bacon) talking to his works (e.g. the plays under the name of Shakespeare)? "Your monument shall be my gentle verse"; "You still shall live (such virtue hath my Pen)"... etc.

Hi Eric,

Thank you for the video.

Indeed, I take it as one possible interpretation. 🙂 

Interestingly, we have "I grant" at the bottom right of the page instead of the number 82 of the following sonnet.

There are 117 words in this poem ( can it be linked with the research of Hen.W on number 117?)

It means that with "I grant" there are 119 words in total.

In my view, 119 is the numerical value of MEDIOCRA FIRMA (simple cipher).

I let each and every one explore the "Middle" of this Sonnet 81. 😊

And from an "Alchemical point of view", I like the fact that the 81st word is  "ore-read".

Notice that the first two verses begin with "Or".

"Or" is the French world for "Gold"

If 81  (9 x 9 ) is linked to the magical square of the Moon (Silver), the magic square of the Sun (Gold) is linked to 36 ( 6 x 6 ).

image.png.f4e5e990108123ee2659e5785a687212.png

The initial sentence proposed by the A.I. was "Love, Wisdom and Magic, it must be".

I changed "and" by "or" in order to have a reference to "Gold" in 36th position, almost in the center of my poem.

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Wow! 1

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Alchemical Quest

image.png.c159e96d88658ba2bd88fb9435429c44.png

The poem is inscribed in a square centered on the "Ma" (The Mother) of "Magic".

https://www.rosieanderson.net/post/ma-mother-goddess-of-the-wilds

With "or" it forms the word AMOR meaning LOVE.

LOVE is the KEY.

If "Key" is the 33rd word , "Love" is the 34th word.

KEY : LOVE  -> 33 + 34 = 67 = FRANCIS

The simple cipher of AMOR is 44.

And I remind you that in my view 44 hides the Child (yeled) with the blood (Dam) of the Phoenix (Chol).

I also like the idea that by using the language of the birds :

AMOR is "ÂME HORS"  -  SOUL OUT (of the Body)

It echoes the first two verses of the poem :

Through skies of ethereal dreams, I soar, (33 letters)

Seeking Wisdom in every wave's roar. (29 letters)

33 + 29 = 62 # F.B.

😊

 

  • Wow! 3

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Alchemical Quest

Lege, Relege ...

(Read, Read again ...)

image.png.ad404e17664a526134ec7a557b5ca91d.png

'Lege, Relege'  hides "F.B." (Francis Bacon's Biliteral cipher).

But this is also a reference to two books.

THE BELMAN OF LONDON (1608)

121819-17-Elizabeth-England-Crime-Law-Medieval-Middle-Ages-754x1024.jpg

British Library, Public domain.

REMAINS CONCERNING BRITAIN by William Camden (3rd edition - 1623)

image.png.7627a1e743e6a5690de6b788847e6bb4.png

(For more details, see the essay of Geo. J. Pfeiffer in the Baconiana of february 1923 and my video CODEX33)

  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

'Lege, Relege'  hides "F.B." (Francis Bacon's Biliteral cipher).

OMG! I get an F! I missed the bold letters!

I did work with it and connected the two words:

https://www.alchemywebsite.com/caezza3.html

"ORA, LEGE, LEGE, LEGE, RELEGE, LABORA ET INVENIES", declares the motto of the Mutus Liber of 1677, "Pray, Read, Read, Read, Read Again and You Shall Find".

But I missed the font change. UGH

aabab aaaab

I have new glasses to pick on May 16th. Hopefully they will open many new doors. 🙂

 

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 1

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

OMG! I get an F! I missed the bold letters!

I did work with it and connected the two words:

https://www.alchemywebsite.com/caezza3.html

"ORA, LEGE, LEGE, LEGE, RELEGE, LABORA ET INVENIES", declares the motto of the Mutus Liber of 1677, "Pray, Read, Read, Read, Read Again and You Shall Find".

But I missed the font change. UGH

aabab aaaab

I have new glasses to pick on May 16th. Hopefully they will open many new doors. 🙂

 

Hi Yann, I hit the funny button because you are renowned for seeing things other people miss. So this is an historic occasion. 🙂

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/8/2024 at 9:21 AM, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Yann, I hit the funny button because you are renowned for seeing things other people miss. So this is an historic occasion. 🙂

 

 

Hi Eric,

Few days ago, I did not really understand the meaning of your post because I did not see the "funny button" you referred to. 

But after some reflection, I think that I have finally understood. 😅

Be sure, that I had the alchemical reference to the Mutus Liber as well as to the frontispiece of "Le Mystère des Cathédrales"  by Fulcanelli in mind ! 😊

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frontispice_du_Mystère_des_cathédrales.jpg

I did not mention them because I knew that Rob would  find them .

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Alchemical Quest

image.png.1746721a0cda654062208ba333e5119f.png

There are three numbers and one year.

one + 116 + XXVII = 144 = SIR FRANCIS BACON

1617 can be seen as 16 + 17 = 33 = BACON

144 + 33 = 177 = WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

undefined

116 + 27 = 143

I like to think that 143 represents the numerical value of his mother QUEEN ELIZABETH.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/161/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

image.png.86b3bb78056ad147bc6eb6020a123597.png 

Page 143 of the First Folio.

SONNET 143

image.png.9c4b2be19b7a2992a3d6ea1b1a250e6d.png

image.png.e61512fdc1d3f20756df6cdbdc54b6f4.pngimage.png.45bd6c92f3acd55d2e7223161a5439f3.png

 

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Eric,

Few days ago, I did not really understand the meaning of your post because I did not see the "funny button" you referred to. 

But after some reflection, I think that I have finally understood. 😅

Be sure, that I had the alchemical reference to the Mutus Liber as well as to the frontispiece of "Le Mystère des Cathédrales"  by Fulcanelli in mind ! 😊

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Frontispice_du_Mystère_des_cathédrales.jpg

I did not mention them because I knew that Rob would  find them .

 

Hi Yann - it was just my flippant way of saying how brilliant you are. Fulcanelli was my guide to Notre Dame Cathedral when I had 10 days in Paris years ago. 🙂

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...