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Royal Crescent... Too Good to be True...


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I am honestly stunned (and, in some manner, appalled) that this topic has eluded the forums for so long. It's about a building... 30 buildings, in fact... and one could argue that there are really 33.

Oh, and the building(s) are shaped like a crescent!

Go ahead and tell me that this is merely a figment of a young Baconian's dangerously overactive imagination. I'll happily show you this image:

Bath_archaeology_eb21754-me.jpg

The 30 late Georgian townhouses that form the Royal Crescent in Bath were constructed from 1767-1774 and are the masterwork of visionary Palladian architect John Wood, the Younger. I can't seem to find much on his life aside from the suspiciously sparse Wikipedia entry (which makes no mention of SFB or Rosicrucianism). It has, however, been documented that there are 114 columns across the entire facade. The number of windows, doors, etc.? Don't make me count!

The Crescent shape seems a bit too obvious, as do the letters RC. There's another development nearby, known as the King's Circus. It's a circle of rowhouses, styled similarly to those at the Crescent. In their center is a grove of mature trees (the number of which I am uncertain.) This image shows the two developments in proximity to one another:

New Bath – 18th-century Bath

Do you see the question mark? I wonder what Mr. Wood is inviting us to ASK?

Also, it does kinda resemble Aquarius...

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7 hours ago, Marvin Haines said:

I am honestly stunned (and, in some manner, appalled) that this topic has eluded the forums for so long. It's about a building... 30 buildings, in fact... and one could argue that there are really 33.

Oh, and the building(s) are shaped like a crescent!

Go ahead and tell me that this is merely a figment of a young Baconian's dangerously overactive imagination. I'll happily show you this image:

Bath_archaeology_eb21754-me.jpg

The 30 late Georgian townhouses that form the Royal Crescent in Bath were constructed from 1767-1774 and are the masterwork of visionary Palladian architect John Wood, the Younger. I can't seem to find much on his life aside from the suspiciously sparse Wikipedia entry (which makes no mention of SFB or Rosicrucianism). It has, however, been documented that there are 114 columns across the entire facade. The number of windows, doors, etc.? Don't make me count!

The Crescent shape seems a bit too obvious, as do the letters RC. There's another development nearby, known as the King's Circus. It's a circle of rowhouses, styled similarly to those at the Crescent. In their center is a grove of mature trees (the number of which I am uncertain.) This image shows the two developments in proximity to one another:

New Bath – 18th-century Bath

Do you see the question mark? I wonder what Mr. Wood is inviting us to ASK?

Also, it does kinda resemble Aquarius...

Hi Marvin

You asked: Go ahead and tell me that this is merely a figment of a young Baconian's dangerously overactive imagination...

Okay then. Your self-diagnosis is probably correct. There is no question mark or question to answer. What you are seeing

is an elegant architectural solution to upper middle-class housing. Nothing more. Who, in the 18th century, could look down

from a bird's-eye perspective? All of us here have experienced the private thrill of discovery in the middle of researching a train

of thought, and we all celebrate it in others. To do good work, one has to take it slow and steady, grind your way through it.

I think you already know this though, don't you?

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Eric, I agree that what we have here is in all likelihood "an elegant architectural solution to upper middle-class housing. Nothing more.". But I don't agree with the implications of this: "Who, in the 18th century, could look down from a bird's-eye perspective?". They could make maps as if seen from a bird's-eye perspective. Here are two, from 1783 and 1810.

image.png.ea4d40ad7dfad8f4760e3ce8c917b33d.png

image.png.fd3a04148b3f85273b6a25af1a9e1ab6.png

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