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Della Porta Ciphers


Kate

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Few years ago, a copy of the 1591 Edition was on sale at auction.

I tried my luck, but the starting price was 800 E, my max bid was 1500 E and the the bids rose to more than 3500 E.

No regrets, the book was out of my range.

Here is something that explains why I wanted to have this book.

Once again, it proves nothing, it can be only a coincidence, but at that time it caught my attention ...

https://archive.org/details/bim_early-english-books-1475-1640_de-furtiuis-literarum-no_porta-giovanni-battista_1591/page/n21/mode/2up

image.png.d1110f4d4d445962c405471175455791.png

As if by chance, the first error in the book is in the name "Trismegisto" for "Hermes Trismegistus".

It allows to have "Tri/Tri" or 33 on top and the error is on page 3 line 9 providing the number 39 that is F BACON simple cipher.

And I have just realized that C (3) and I (9) are the initials of Iacobus Castlevitrius. ( Thank you A Phoenix ! 🙂 )

image.png.e2a97476d90de04691a28ec0ca4b3499.png

In passing, If C = 100 (Roman) and if the first line contains 33 letters ( as brilliantly pointed out by A Phoenix), the first sentence is also 33 words long.

Back to the page of ERRATA, I wondered what was the 33rd error on that page in each column...

image.png.10401f893b4490b2303b02b438bda339.png

I decided to take a look at page 176 knowing that 177 was the simple cipher of WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ...

image.png.f351b869c7efeddba2c35df92f171a4a.png

 

image.png.054b312613577e842c38bd4172880373.png

What if the error in "AGE(N)DA" was intended in order to hide BACON (The A and the O) ?

I consider this as a possibility !

And here is the page 43 with "concepta" and ... TEMPUS ! 🙂 

https://archive.org/details/bim_early-english-books-1475-1640_de-furtiuis-literarum-no_porta-giovanni-battista_1591/page/42/mode/2up 

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23 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

As if by chance, the first error in the book is in the name "Trismegisto" for "Hermes Trismegistus".

I'm curious about "Trismegistro" (with the "r")?

Reading Latin would be a huge plus for any Baconian! 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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2 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

The only people that matter in the quest of the betterment of our knowledge are those who can falsify the falsifiable. Dabbling in the rest is a fool's errand of trying to operate on the unfalsifiable as if that was scientific reasoned behavior. Who can disprove someone's imagination?

To bring this back to Earth, and back to this tiny forum, we are a small passionate group of friends who share what we love to discuss which is related to Bacon and his role in the Shakespeare works. We are not World leaders directing the masses. We are not even a for profit business. 🙂

We are a choir for Bacon. Enjoy a part of a translation from Bacon's 23rd eulogy:

Dost thou imagine, foolish passenger,
That he who led Apollo’s sweetest choir
Of Muses fresh from the Pierian springs,
Entombed in coldest marble is immured?

Are we Apollo's sweetest choir of fresh Muses?

I like that idea. 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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WILLIAM F. FRIEDMAN AND THE MANY BACONIAN-SHAKESPEAREAN CIPHERS

According to Mrs Gallup’s decipherments from Novum Organum Bacon reveals that he had used six ciphers in some of his works: the Bi-literal Cipher, the Word Cipher, Capital Letter Cipher, Clock Cipher, the Symbol Cipher and Anagrammatic Cipher. In the Hints to the Decipherer of The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon its anonymous author William F. Friedman in reference to these six cipher systems prophesizes that future generations will utilise them to bring forth more secrets about Bacon’s life and writings:

We know that at least six kinds of ciphers have to be found out. Of these, so much is known about four or five as to leave little doubt that the next generation will be able to unravel their long concealed secrets.1

1. Anon., Hints to the Decipherer of The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam Viscount St. Alban (Riverbank Laboratories, Geneva, Illinois, 1916), p. 15. See the anonymous unpublished fifty page typescript The Fundamental Principles of the Baconian Ciphers  And Application To Books Of The sixteenth And Seventeenth Centuries Compiled  by George Fabyan (Copyright 1916 By George Fabyan), pages unnumbered (p. 31) for which a brief definition is given for each of these six ciphers.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a very unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

WILLIAM F. FRIEDMAN AND THE MANY BACONIAN-SHAKESPEAREAN CIPHERS

According to Mrs Gallup’s decipherments from Novum Organum Bacon reveals that he had used six ciphers in some of his works: the Bi-literal Cipher, the Word Cipher, Capital Letter Cipher, Clock Cipher, the Symbol Cipher and Anagrammatic Cipher. In the Hints to the Decipherer of The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon its anonymous author William F. Friedman in reference to these six cipher systems prophesize that future generations will utilise them to bring forth more secrets about Bacon’s life and writings:

We know that at least six kinds of ciphers have to be found out. Of these, so much is known about four or five as to leave little doubt that the next generation will be able to unravel their long concealed secrets.1

1. Anon., Hints to the Decipherer of The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam Viscount St. Alban (Riverbank Laboratories, Geneva, Illinois, 1916), p. 15. See the anonymous unpublished fifty page typescript The Fundamental Principles of the Baconian Ciphers  And Application To Books Of The sixteenth And Seventeenth Centuries Compiled  by George Fabyan (Copyright 1916 By George Fabyan), pages unnumbered (p. 31) for which a brief definition is given for each of these six ciphers.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a very unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

 

 

Hi A Phoenix

This quote from Friedman (in his younger days?) suggests that he once sincerely regarded FB as a genius. He then becomes director of cryptography for the SIS and later the NSA. After which, he disavows the very quest he embarked on at the beginning of his career. Forgive my naive and simplified rendering. Was it greed or blackmail?

https://www.nsa.gov/History/Cryptologic-History/Historical-Figures/Historical-Figures-View/Article/1623026/william-f-friedman/

Edited by Eric Roberts
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ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, THE FRIEDMANS AND THE BACON BI-LITERAL CIPHER  

Hi Eric,

Yes the quote was from the time when the Friedmans were at Riverbank from 1916-20. 

The presence of Bacon’s Biliteral Cipher was announced to the world in a series of volumes published by the remarkable Elizabeth Wells Gallup entitled The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon Discovered in his Works. On examining the prefatory material of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio Gallup deciphered a series of revelations about Francis Bacon’s secret life and enormous corpus of writings revealing that not only was he the secret author of the Shakespeare works but also the works published in the names of among others Spenser, Greene, and Marlowe, and that he was the concealed royal son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.

News of these revelations soon reached the ears of Colonel George Fabyan who had had set up his  Riverbank estate located west of Chicago which is still shrouded in secrecy and mystery to the present day. It was here that Colonel Fabyan provided Gallup with a staff and extensive resources to continue her investigations into the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher and its presence in the Shakespeare works and other Baconian publications set forth anonymously or in the names of others. She was afterwards joined at Riverbank by William F. Friedman and his future wife Elizebeth Smith, the widely acclaimed duo who went on to become the two greatest cryptographers of the twentieth century and the authors of The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined.

The years spent by the Friedmans at Riverbank are not well-documented and what we know or believe of their time there almost entirely derives from the story told by the Friedmans themselves in a series of unpublished manuscripts and lectures and their book The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined.   

For the next few years the Friedmans worked closely alongside Elizabeth Wells Gallup assisting her in a complex and minute study of the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher and its links to the Shakespeare First Folio and soon after the Friedmans were appointed the joints Heads of the Riverbank Department of Ciphers.

During this period the Riverbank Cipher Department headed by the Friedmans produced a series of pamphlets known as the Riverbank Laboratories Publications on Cryptography. These comprise of a series of important ground-breaking technical monographs dealing with cryptography and cryptanalysis and several dealing with Gallup’s work on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher. A number of the volumes on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher were issued anonymously and the identity of their author (s), who were of course known to the Friedmans, remain unknown to the world at large to the present day.

For more than half a century the Friedmans had every opportunity to reveal the identity of the authors of these anonymous Riverbank publications on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher but repeatedly refused to do so. The reason why, is the Friedmans themselves, were the anonymous authors of these tracts in which it is emphatically stated that the presence of Bacon’s cipher system identified by Elizabeth Wells Gallup has been repeatedly tested and dissected, and was and is, demonstrable beyond any and all doubt.

The Friedmans knew there were Bacon ciphers present in the Shakespeare works and that Bacon is the true secret author of the Shakespeare works, a secret which at a single stroke completely collapses the Stratfordian fiction and illusion that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere was the author of the Shakespeare plays. It was a secret they took to the graves but not beyond it. For on the tombstone of William and Elizebeth Friedman, one designed by themselves, the two greatest cryptographers of the twentieth century, left a secret cryptographic message: FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

 

 

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5 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, THE FRIEDMANS AND THE BACON BI-LITERAL CIPHER  

Hi Eric,

Yes the quote was from the time when the Friedmans were at Riverbank from 1916-20. 

The presence of Bacon’s Biliteral Cipher was announced to the world in a series of volumes published by the remarkable Elizabeth Wells Gallup entitled The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon Discovered in his Works. On examining the prefatory material of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio Gallup deciphered a series of revelations about Francis Bacon’s secret life and enormous corpus of writings revealing that not only was he the secret author of the Shakespeare works but also the works published in the names of among others Spenser, Greene, and Marlowe, and that he was the concealed royal son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.

News of these revelations soon reached the ears of Colonel George Fabyan who had had set up his  Riverbank estate located west of Chicago which is still shrouded in secrecy and mystery to the present day. It was here that Colonel Fabyan provided Gallup with a staff and extensive resources to continue her investigations into the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher and its presence in the Shakespeare works and other Baconian publications set forth anonymously or in the names of others. She was afterwards joined at Riverbank by William F. Friedman and his future wife Elizebeth Smith, the widely acclaimed duo who went on to become the two greatest cryptographers of the twentieth century and the authors of The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined.

The years spent by the Friedmans at Riverbank are not well-documented and what we know or believe of their time there almost entirely derives from the story told by the Friedmans themselves in a series of unpublished manuscripts and lectures and their book The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined.   

For the next few years the Friedmans worked closely alongside Elizabeth Wells Gallup assisting her in a complex and minute study of the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher and its links to the Shakespeare First Folio and soon after the Friedmans were appointed the joints Heads of the Riverbank Department of Ciphers.

During this period the Riverbank Cipher Department headed by the Friedmans produced a series of pamphlets known as the Riverbank Laboratories Publications on Cryptography. These comprise of a series of important ground-breaking technical monographs dealing with cryptography and cryptanalysis and several dealing with Gallup’s work on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher. A number of the volumes on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher were issued anonymously and the identity of their author (s), who were of course known to the Friedmans, remain unknown to the world at large to the present day.

For more than half a century the Friedmans had every opportunity to reveal the identity of the authors of these anonymous Riverbank publications on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher but repeatedly refused to do so. The reason why, is the Friedmans themselves, were the anonymous authors of these tracts in which it is emphatically stated that the presence of Bacon’s cipher system identified by Elizabeth Wells Gallup has been repeatedly tested and dissected, and was and is, demonstrable beyond any and all doubt.

The Friedmans knew there were Bacon ciphers present in the Shakespeare works and that Bacon is the true secret author of the Shakespeare works, a secret which at a single stroke completely collapses the Stratfordian fiction and illusion that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere was the author of the Shakespeare plays. It was a secret they took to the graves but not beyond it. For on the tombstone of William and Elizebeth Friedman, one designed by themselves, the two greatest cryptographers of the twentieth century, left a secret cryptographic message: FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

 

 

Thank you.

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