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Bringing home Bacon Shakespeare Cervantes


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by Lawrence Gerald

Bringing home Bacon Shakespeare Cervantes (sirbacon.org)

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“Bringing Home Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes.”

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES

A word from Lawrence Gerald
March 2024

I visited the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont CA on January 22, 1991. It was my only visit there and it was during their annual Francis Bacon Birthday Celebration that was open to the public. I had been in touch with the curator, Elizabeth Wrigley who had governed for over 50 years an https://sirbacon.org/links/wrigley.htm and she gave me full permission to check out the books.

I remember how eager I was to peruse the Library’s stacks in this Disneyworld of Baconiana. Out of all the hundreds and hundreds of books the one that struck me the most was discovering this book in German, Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes by Alfred Von Weber-Ebenhof. I didn’t know this book existed. It was published in Austria in 1917 and it was the first book published that challenged the authorship of Cervantes’ Don Quixote.

BACON-SHAKESPEARE-CERVANTES by Alfred von Weber-Ebenhoff

I remember calling my friend Steven Marble a longtime Baconian that I was introduced to by Peter Dawkins, and telling him about this book and asking him if he had heard about it. Steven said no he hadn’t known about the book and I asked him if he ever finds anything more about the book could you please let me know.

A month goes by and I will never forget this moment when I get a call from Steven telling me I’m not going to believe what had transpired since our last call. With the help of Elizabeth Wrigley, Steven was introduced to Emily who turns out was an old acquaintance who wanted to find a new home for her father’s Baconian library. Turns out Emily’s father was Arthur Cornwall author of his own book on Bacon, that combined ciphers and an investigation into Bacon’s life beyond his alleged death in 1626.
Cornwall, Arthur. Francis the First Unacknowledged King of Great Britain and Ireland. 1936.

Included in the books being donated to Steven by Emily was an English translation of Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes by Weber Ebenhof ! Arthur Cornwall had translated the book during the 1930’s from the German to English. It was the only English copy in the world, and it was unpublished. Wow. What a tangled web we weave.

Don Elfenbein who has written a wonderful Book Review of Bacon Shakespeare and Cervantes and has on good authority shared with me that the English translation is of high quality.

I want to thank Steven Marble for his generous permission to allow publishing the book on sirbacon.org and I am grateful to Dr John Torbert, who took on the digitizing of the Cornwall English translation for his selfless efforts and taking the time to bring this into fruition. Also huge thanks to Rob Fowler, who helped guide the formatting and preparation of the text for the readers of sirbacon.org

I would also like to acknowledge all the previous writers who shared their expertise on the subject of Don Quixote authorship in Baconiana the published Journal of the Francis Bacon Society who are about to celebrate 138 years of continued existence.
https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/
This includes Francis Carr who was willing to risk his reputation for where his research led him and published the second explosive book on the topic Who Wrote Don Quxiote ? It took Carr 12 years to endure ridicule and closed doors before having published his book in 2004 because it’s that controversial and people are biased from their uneducated culture bound opinions and already made up minds. The authorship of Don Quixote remains controversial and upsetting for some, to be dismissed by others, while contemplated, digested and enjoyed by many more who have an open mind in search for truth.

It’s now been 33 years since I discovered the book in the stacks of the Francis Bacon Library in Claremont, CA , a 107 years since Ebenhof published his book and around 94 years since Cornwall translated it from German.

So there you have it the story how this book came to be and now sirbacon.org is happy to present for the first time the English translation of Alfred Von Weber-Ebenhof’s Bacon, Shakespeare and Cervantes.

Read the complete article here.

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Hi Lawrence,

What a truly magnificent contribution to Baconian scholarship and also a fitting tribute to Francis Carr, Cornwall and all who went before. This will serve as a great resource in perpetuity for all Bacon scholars and other interested students who wish to learn the truth about the authorship of Don Quixote.  Thank you on behalf all the visitors to sirbacon.org and B'Hive and all the other Baconians around the world.

For those who wish to learn more see the following:

THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN THE 1612 TRANSLATION OUT OF THE SPANISH OF LORD BACON'S THE HISTORY OF DON QUIXOTE FATHERED ON MIGUEL DE CERVANTES.

THE ENORMOUS RANGE OF EVIDENCE REVEALING AND CONFIRMING LORD BACON'S AUTHORSHIP OF DON QUIXOTE IS OVERWHELMING AND IRREFUTABLE.

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/index.php?/topic/679-bringing-home-bacon-shakespeare-cervantes/#comment-12861

Francis Carr, Who Wrote Don Quixote (USA: Xlibris, 2004), 198 pages

L. Biddulph, ‘The Great Assizes Holden In Parnassus’, Baconiana, Vol. IV, New Series, January 1896, pp. 42-8

John Hutchinson, ‘Some Thoughts On “Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, No. 53, January, 1916, pp. 18-28

Ben. Haworth-Booth, ‘Philips’ Don Quixote. Folio 1687’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, No. 53, January, 1916, pp. 29-32

Parker Woodward, ‘“Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, Third Series, No. 56, October 1916, pp. 173-86

Granville C. Cunningham, ‘Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XV, No. 58,  April 1917, pp. 110-27

Parker Woodward, ‘Portraits of Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVIII, No. 63, (Third Series), March 1921, pp. 56-7

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Review of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, No. 64, Junes 1922, pp. 50-61

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Review of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, No. 65, Junes 1923, pp. 136-42

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Extracts And Parallels From The Parnassus Plays, Don Quixote And As You Like It’, Baconiana, Vol. XIX, No. 74 (Third Series), June 1928, pp. 175-85

Horace Nickson, ‘The Authorship Of “Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. 78 (Third Series), February, 1931, pp. 271-85

L. Biddulph, ‘Some Notes On Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XXV, No. 100, July, 1941, pp. 244-9

Edward Johnson, ‘Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXVIII, No. 113, October, 1944, pp. 155-7

Dr R. Langdon-Down, ‘Observations On Shelton’s Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXVI, No. 143, July, 1952, pp. 58-67

G. S. O., ‘The Frontispiece Of Volume 1 Of Don Quixote De  La Mancha, (1615) A Bibliographical Discovery’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 147, December 1953, pp. 107-10

Pierre Henrion, ‘A Most Humurous Quixotic Quest’, Baconiana, Vol. LXII, No. 179, October 1979, pp. 13-26

Francis Carr, ‘Cervantes, England and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVI, No. 193, 1995, pp. 54-59

Francis Carr, ‘Who Wrote Don Quixote?’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVII, No. 194, 1997, pp. 21-30

John S. Alabaster, ‘Word-Length Frequency In Sonnets Of Shakespeare and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVII, No. 194, 1997, p. 31.

John S. Alabaster, ‘Some Further Links Between Francis Bacon and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 196, June 1999, pp. 5-41

John Alabaster, ‘An Analysis Of The Latin In Bacon’s Promus’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 196, June 1999, pp. 55-97

For further articles and information See: https://sirbacon.org/search_gcse/?q=DON QUIXOTE

DQ.png 

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7 hours ago, Rob at 007 said:

...and I am grateful to Dr John Torbert, who took on the digitizing of the Cornwall English translation for his selfless efforts and taking the time to bring this into fruition.

Lawrence, I sit here thinking of the several old and possibly rare books I have now that were copied by you along with many Xerox pages of old Baconiana. Maybe you spent your valuable time and effort to copy page by page for many of us who you shared with at old fashioned office supply stores before FedEx and UPS had copy services. 🙂

Baconians are resourceful indeed!

I want to add my own Thank You to Steven Marble, Dr John Torbert, Don Elfenbein, and of course you, Lawrence Gerald for being our fearless leader in this continuing SirBacon.org project.

We are the only place in the world right now with the English translation of the German "Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes"! 🙂

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-shakespeare-cervantes/

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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2 hours ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

AA

In the 1612 translation by Thomas Shelton , Cervantes tells us "yet in truth but a stepfather to Don-Quixote."

https://sirbacon.org/donquixoteaa1612.htm

AA

"The 9 pages of Preface are printed in italics except here and there where a word or words are in Roman type like the hyphenated Don-Quixote. The Roman type words add up to 157 in all which is the numerical count of Fra Rosi Crosse. This appears to associate the work of Bacon and the Rosicrucians."

So far no luck finding an online facsimile, but oh my! Imagine what we might find in the 9 pages!!

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

"The 9 pages of Preface are printed in italics except here and there where a word or words are in Roman type like the hyphenated Don-Quixote. The Roman type words add up to 157 in all which is the numerical count of Fra Rosi Crosse. This appears to associate the work of Bacon and the Rosicrucians."

So far no luck finding an online facsimile, but oh my! Imagine what we might find in the 9 pages!!

 

Brilliant  cypher method

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

"The 9 pages of Preface are printed in italics except here and there where a word or words are in Roman type like the hyphenated Don-Quixote. The Roman type words add up to 157 in all which is the numerical count of Fra Rosi Crosse. This appears to associate the work of Bacon and the Rosicrucians."

So far no luck finding an online facsimile, but oh my! Imagine what we might find in the 9 pages!!

 

https://www.google.fr/books/edition/The_History_of_the_Valorous_and_Wittie_K/dgCNj8Bo1e8C?hl=fr&gbpv=1

Enjoy !

😉

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

"The 9 pages of Preface are printed in italics except here and there where a word or words are in Roman type like the hyphenated Don-Quixote. The Roman type words add up to 157 in all which is the numerical count of Fra Rosi Crosse. This appears to associate the work of Bacon and the Rosicrucians."

So far no luck finding an online facsimile, but oh my! Imagine what we might find in the 9 pages!!

 

Hi Rob,

It has certainly already been noticed that the first sentence of the Authors preface to the Readers contains 33 words.

Here is some thoughts/ ideas regarding the 2nd page ...

https://www.google.fr/books/edition/The_History_of_the_Valorous_and_Wittie_K/dgCNj8Bo1e8C?hl=fr&gbpv=1

image.png.2576db9ae4339884a78a88146b2cd954.png

Interestingly From Reader to Reader we can find "by f. bacon arm"

I also like the idea that with  the "ad" of the Reader on top (or with only the "d" and  with the "a" in but "a" stepfather) it gives:

Drama by F. Bacon

Father  is the 33rd word (33=BACON)

"Free-wil" is on the 33rd line of the preface

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16 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Lawrence,

What a truly magnificent contribution to Baconian scholarship and also a fitting tribute to Francis Carr, Cornwall and all who went before. This will serve as a great resource in perpetuity for all Bacon scholars and other interested students who wish to learn the truth about the authorship of Don Quixote.  Thank you on behalf all the visitors to sirbacon.org and B'Hive and all the other Baconians around the world.

For those who wish to learn more see the following:

THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN THE 1612 TRANSLATION OUT OF THE SPANISH OF LORD BACON'S THE HISTORY OF DON QUIXOTE FATHERED ON MIGUEL DE CERVANTES.

THE ENORMOUS RANGE OF EVIDENCE REVEALING AND CONFIRMING LORD BACON'S AUTHORSHIP OF DON QUIXOTE IS OVERWHELMING AND IRREFUTABLE.

Francis Carr, Who Wrote Don Quixote (USA: Xlibris, 2004), 198 pages

L. Biddulph, ‘The Great Assizes Holden In Parnassus’, Baconiana, Vol. IV, New Series, January 1896, pp. 42-8

John Hutchinson, ‘Some Thoughts On “Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, No. 53, January, 1916, pp. 18-28

Ben. Haworth-Booth, ‘Philips’ Don Quixote. Folio 1687’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, No. 53, January, 1916, pp. 29-32

Parker Woodward, ‘“Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, Third Series, No. 56, October 1916, pp. 173-86

Granville C. Cunningham, ‘Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XV, No. 58,  April 1917, pp. 110-27

Parker Woodward, ‘Portraits of Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVIII, No. 63, (Third Series), March 1921, pp. 56-7

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Review of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, No. 64, Junes 1922, pp. 50-61

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Review of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, No. 65, Junes 1923, pp. 136-42

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Extracts And Parallels From The Parnassus Plays, Don Quixote And As You Like It’, Baconiana, Vol. XIX, No. 74 (Third Series), June 1928, pp. 175-85

Horace Nickson, ‘The Authorship Of “Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. 78 (Third Series), February, 1931, pp. 271-85

L. Biddulph, ‘Some Notes On Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XXV, No. 100, July, 1941, pp. 244-9

Edward Johnson, ‘Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXVIII, No. 113, October, 1944, pp. 155-7

Dr R. Langdon-Down, ‘Observations On Shelton’s Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXVI, No. 143, July, 1952, pp. 58-67

G. S. O., ‘The Frontispiece Of Volume 1 Of Don Quixote De  La Mancha, (1615) A Bibliographical Discovery’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 147, December 1953, pp. 107-10

Pierre Henrion, ‘A Most Humurous Quixotic Quest’, Baconiana, Vol. LXII, No. 179, October 1979, pp. 13-26

Francis Carr, ‘Cervantes, England and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVI, No. 193, 1995, pp. 54-59

Francis Carr, ‘Who Wrote Don Quixote?’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVII, No. 194, 1997, pp. 21-30

John S. Alabaster, ‘Word-Length Frequency In Sonnets Of Shakespeare and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVII, No. 194, 1997, p. 31.

John S. Alabaster, ‘Some Further Links Between Francis Bacon and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 196, June 1999, pp. 5-41

John Alabaster, ‘An Analysis Of The Latin In Bacon’s Promus’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 196, June 1999, pp. 55-97

For further articles and information See: https://sirbacon.org/search_gcse/?q=DON QUIXOTE

DQ.png 

The_History_of_the_Valorous_and_Wittie_K.pdfAP
Add this 1612  Thomas Shelton Trans  As Below to your As Above List

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The Authors preface to the Reader invites to take a look at the Beginning and at the End ( The ABC ... From A to Z)

Here is my take on the decipherment of the end of the Preface ...

image.png.6e4154b06d9af67a0d4c54cd221231a6.png

https://www.google.fr/books/edition/The_History_of_the_Valorous_and_Wittie_K/dgCNj8Bo1e8C?hl=fr&gbpv=1

By counting  backward from "Vale", the last word, "Squire" is the 33rd word. 33 = BACON

"deciphered" is the 26th word. 26 # B.F.

WE WILL NOT FORGET YOU !

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21 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Lawrence,

What a truly magnificent contribution to Baconian scholarship and also a fitting tribute to Francis Carr, Cornwall and all who went before. This will serve as a great resource in perpetuity for all Bacon scholars and other interested students who wish to learn the truth about the authorship of Don Quixote.  Thank you on behalf all the visitors to sirbacon.org and B'Hive and all the other Baconians around the world.

For those who wish to learn more see the following:

THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE IN THE 1612 TRANSLATION OUT OF THE SPANISH OF LORD BACON'S THE HISTORY OF DON QUIXOTE FATHERED ON MIGUEL DE CERVANTES.

THE ENORMOUS RANGE OF EVIDENCE REVEALING AND CONFIRMING LORD BACON'S AUTHORSHIP OF DON QUIXOTE IS OVERWHELMING AND IRREFUTABLE.

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/index.php?/topic/679-bringing-home-bacon-shakespeare-cervantes/#comment-12861

Francis Carr, Who Wrote Don Quixote (USA: Xlibris, 2004), 198 pages

L. Biddulph, ‘The Great Assizes Holden In Parnassus’, Baconiana, Vol. IV, New Series, January 1896, pp. 42-8

John Hutchinson, ‘Some Thoughts On “Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, No. 53, January, 1916, pp. 18-28

Ben. Haworth-Booth, ‘Philips’ Don Quixote. Folio 1687’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, No. 53, January, 1916, pp. 29-32

Parker Woodward, ‘“Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. XIV, Third Series, No. 56, October 1916, pp. 173-86

Granville C. Cunningham, ‘Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XV, No. 58,  April 1917, pp. 110-27

Parker Woodward, ‘Portraits of Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVIII, No. 63, (Third Series), March 1921, pp. 56-7

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Review of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, No. 64, Junes 1922, pp. 50-61

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Review of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, No. 65, Junes 1923, pp. 136-42

S. A. E. Hickson, ‘Extracts And Parallels From The Parnassus Plays, Don Quixote And As You Like It’, Baconiana, Vol. XIX, No. 74 (Third Series), June 1928, pp. 175-85

Horace Nickson, ‘The Authorship Of “Don Quixote”’, Baconiana, Vol. 78 (Third Series), February, 1931, pp. 271-85

L. Biddulph, ‘Some Notes On Cervantes’, Baconiana, Vol. XXV, No. 100, July, 1941, pp. 244-9

Edward Johnson, ‘Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXVIII, No. 113, October, 1944, pp. 155-7

Dr R. Langdon-Down, ‘Observations On Shelton’s Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXVI, No. 143, July, 1952, pp. 58-67

G. S. O., ‘The Frontispiece Of Volume 1 Of Don Quixote De  La Mancha, (1615) A Bibliographical Discovery’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXVIII, No. 147, December 1953, pp. 107-10

Pierre Henrion, ‘A Most Humurous Quixotic Quest’, Baconiana, Vol. LXII, No. 179, October 1979, pp. 13-26

Francis Carr, ‘Cervantes, England and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVI, No. 193, 1995, pp. 54-59

Francis Carr, ‘Who Wrote Don Quixote?’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVII, No. 194, 1997, pp. 21-30

John S. Alabaster, ‘Word-Length Frequency In Sonnets Of Shakespeare and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. LXXVII, No. 194, 1997, p. 31.

John S. Alabaster, ‘Some Further Links Between Francis Bacon and Don Quixote’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 196, June 1999, pp. 5-41

John Alabaster, ‘An Analysis Of The Latin In Bacon’s Promus’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 196, June 1999, pp. 55-97

For further articles and information See: https://sirbacon.org/search_gcse/?q=DON QUIXOTE

DQ.png 

Hi A Phoenix

I'm sure you couldn't have missed the hand-written note by Arthur Cornwall at the beginning of Bacon-Shakespeare-Cervantes:

ScreenShot2024-03-02at11_15_43pm.png.39dd8edb3fd16b44d6512d542b19c224.png

 

Perhaps you already knew about the Birmingham Public Reference Library's copy, one of only three. I wonder why he chose Birmingham?

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

We've been trying to find out whether Arthur Bradford Cornwall had any affiliations to Birmingham but cannot find out much about him. His book  Francis the First, Unacknowledged King of Great Britain and Ireland, Known to the World as Francis Bacon was published in 1936 by Cornish Brothers Publishers of New Street, Birmingham so if he wasn't actually from the area he had a connection through his publisher. The Birmingham Library has a rather extraordinary collection, maybe the topic of a future article.

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11 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

We've been trying to find out whether Arthur Bradford Cornwall had any affiliations to Birmingham but cannot find out much about him. His book  Francis the First, Unacknowledged King of Great Britain and Ireland, Known to the World as Francis Bacon was published in 1936 by Cornish Brothers Publishers of New Street, Birmingham so if he wasn't actually from the area he had a connection through his publisher. The Birmingham Library has a rather extraordinary collection, maybe the topic of a future article.

 

Hi A Phoenix

 

The Spanish seem to be more open and honest about the face of their national literary hero - they admit that there is no painted likeness of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. 

ScreenShot2024-03-03at10_14_47am.png.8867dd84f711ab4f45fe2d605a652794.png

Cervantes_Jureguic_1600.jpeg.b5d1f0aa3337444a0273aba1ec1ee25d.jpeg

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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I would like to share with you an idea that came to my mind one hour ago facing an engraving of Cervantes.

image.png.e774625fde46291b304dd88bbf53c4d9.png

We all know the two very similar Francis Bacon's statues, the one at Trinity College and the one at St Michael Church (St Albans).

The two main differences between them are the hat and the right hand.

To be honest, I have always had a problem with the right hand of the Statue at St Albans (the original) that looks like a "dead Hand" contrarly to the right hand of the statue at Trinity College.

In the flow of my thoughts, I wondered if this right hand (St Albans) could have been design to look like the head of a snake  in reference to Asclepios.

Thanks to the post of Eric about Cervantes Portrait, I decided to take a look at Cervantes engravings and I stopped at this one ...

image.png.83930484bf6060809b00f70aaecb314d.pngI did not know that Cervantes had lost the use of his left hand in a Battle and was called El Manco de Lepanto. 

Here is another engraving, after the one by Folkema, in which Cervantes has a cut hand.

http://cervantes.bne.es/es/exposicion/obras/retrato-miguel-cervantes-

(See image 3/9)

What do you think ? Could the "dead hand" of Francis Bacon be a reference to the "dead hand" of Cervantes ?

https://www.meisterdrucke.fr/fine-art-prints/John-Gilbert/267059/M.-Sancho-Panza.html

Sancho Panza

S + P = 33 = BACON

 

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12 hours ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

i didn't know that there is no Cervantes Portrait from the Life. Huge! False Authentic-Like that term.

Hi Lawrence

This Spanish Wiki page tells us that the inscription in the famous portrait of Cervantes was added "centuries later".

 

ScreenShot2024-03-02at11_57_03pm.png.1566e3a6a394a9d8a22e5c8a65197551.png

 

There is a second portrait of "Cervantes" also attributed to Juan de Jauregui which looks nothing like the more famous picture of the author he is supposed to have painted.

 

Juan_de_Jauregui_y_Aguilar_-_Portrait_of_Miguel_de_Cervantes_(1547-1616)_Spanish_writer_Miguel_Cervantes_de_S_-_(MeisterDrucke-983358).jpg.2174ab640529e0290c00facb3ddbe7c7.jpg

ScreenShot2024-03-03at11_27_18am.png.f96d381cc25d334ad841bc0efa7cbdb2.png

Looks dodgy to me...

 

 

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10 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

I would like to share with you an idea that came to my mind one hour ago facing an engraving of Cervantes.

image.png.e774625fde46291b304dd88bbf53c4d9.png

We all know the two very similar Francis Bacon's statues, the one at Trinity College and the one at St Michael Church (St Albans).

The two main differences between them are the hat and the right hand.

To be honest, I have always had a problem with the right hand of the Statue at St Albans (the original) that looks like a "dead Hand" contrarly to the right hand of the statue at Trinity College.

In the flow of my thoughts, I wondered if this right hand (St Albans) could have been design to look like the head of a snake  in reference to Asclepios.

Thanks to the post of Eric about Cervantes Portrait, I decided to take a look at Cervantes engravings and I stopped at this one ...

image.png.83930484bf6060809b00f70aaecb314d.pngI did not know that Cervantes had lost the use of his left hand in a Battle and was called El Manco de Lepanto. 

Here is another engraving, after the one by Folkema, in which Cervantes has a cut hand.

http://cervantes.bne.es/es/exposicion/obras/retrato-miguel-cervantes-

(See image 3/9)

What do you think ? Could the "dead hand" of Francis Bacon be a reference to the "dead hand" of Cervantes ?

https://www.meisterdrucke.fr/fine-art-prints/John-Gilbert/267059/M.-Sancho-Panza.html

Sancho Panza

S + P = 33 = BACON

 

Hi Yann

Could the "dead hand" of Francis Bacon be a reference to the "dead hand" of Cervantes ?

Or the other way around, as the engraving is later than the monument. The former was published in 1768, the year after Folkema's death. The similarity of the two poses, with reference to the left hand, is striking. It is also a natural human gesture (limp wrist) when sitting in an armchair. There would need to be some other hidden clues to clinch it for me. Thank you for the suggestion though.

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On 3/3/2024 at 11:13 PM, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Yann

Could the "dead hand" of Francis Bacon be a reference to the "dead hand" of Cervantes ?

Or the other way around, as the engraving is later than the monument. The former was published in 1768, the year after Folkema's death. The similarity of the two poses, with reference to the left hand, is striking. It is also a natural human gesture (limp wrist) when sitting in an armchair. There would need to be some other hidden clues to clinch it for me. Thank you for the suggestion though.

Thank you for your feedback Eric !

I am not sure that the "dead hand" of Cervantes could be a reference to the "dead hand" of Francis Bacon (St Michael's monument).

Indeed, Cervantes mentioned that he "lost the movement of the left hand for the glory of the right" in "Journey to Parnassus" published in 1614.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viaje_del_Parnaso

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