Jump to content

Cide Hamete Benengeli


Recommended Posts

Yesterday evening, my research led me to Don Quixote and the famous Cide Hamete Benengeli.

Here is the great work on the subjet by Francis Carr:

https://sirbacon.org/quixote.html

Yesterday, before going to bed, I wondered what was the simple cipher of "Cide Hamete Benengeli"

The answer ?

141

For me, 141 is the simple cipher of FRANCIS (67) TUDOR (74)

This morning, I woke up with this thought in mind : " It would have been great if instead of "Hamete" it was "Amete"!"

Why?

Because Amete could be seen as a transliteration of Emeth "AMT" the hebrew word for Truth

Cide Amete Benengeli would provide us with the letters B,A,C for BACon

And the simple cipher of Cide Amete Benengeli is ... 133

133 = 100 + 33 = FRANCIS BACON - 33

133 = ROSI CROSSE

Before heading off to work, I dedided to take a brief glimpse in the second part of Don Quixote (1615).

Imagine my surprise ! 🙂 

https://archive.org/details/segundapartedeli00cerguat/page/472/mode/2up

image.png.3f469e6898dc83f7c0dfb9da746eefb7.png

Sorry, I am not an expert in "Bacon and Don Quixote", so maybe someone already mentioned this by the past.

Along the way, I noticed something else that is, in my view, very interesting.

Last year, I shared with you my thoughts regarding one of the poems of "Underwoods" by Ben Jonson

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/210/mode/2up

image.png.061243d4cf1f0c147fcae1bc6e79c960.png

Notice that in this passage Ben Jonson mentions Amadis de Gaule and Don Quixote.

Here is the 277th leaf of Don Quixote Part 2 ...

https://archive.org/details/segundapartedeli00cerguat/page/554/mode/2up

image.png.1b195151f61acf21ae227738faed8e42.png

277 = 100 (FRANCIS BACON) + 177 (WILLIAM SHAKE-SPEARE)

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 3

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Allisnum2er changed the title to Cide Hamete Benengeli
2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Yesterday evening, my research led me to Don Quixote and the famous Cide Hamete Benengeli.

Here is the great work on the subjet by Francis Carr:

https://sirbacon.org/quixote.html

Funny thing I went to bed last night thinking about Don Quixote and all through the night that was on my mind and in my dreams. Why? Because I woke up working on something for later this week to be published on SirBacon.org about Don Quixote. 😉

 

  • Like 3

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Funny thing I went to bed last night thinking about Don Quixote and all through the night that was on my mind and in my dreams. Why? Because I woke up working on something for later this week to be published on SirBacon.org about Don Quixote. 😉

 

Open minds think alike ! 😊

Now, I am looking forward to reading your upcoming post about Don Quixote !

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Open minds think alike ! 😊

Now, I am looking forward to reading your upcoming post about Don Quixote !

Thanks, but I am putting something together for SirBacon.org that was someone's else's very hard work.

But its a secret for now. 😉

 

  • Like 3

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://sirbacon.org/overheard.htm

This exchange appeared in Francis Carr's Fortnighly News Sheet between Professor Jonathan Bate, a British scholar of Shakespeare and Romanticism and Barry Ide, Cervantes Professor of Spanish at Stratford University :

 

Jonathan Bate : What do you think of Francis Carr's book, Who Wrote Don Quixote?
Barry Ide : I'd rather not say anything at the moment.
Bate : I've been asked by the Daily Telegraph to review it. Can you tell me if you think it's ridiculous?
Ide : I'd rather not comment, as you can understand.
Bate : If I don't write this review, they will think that Carr is right. Have they got in touch with you?
Ide : Yes, I told them I couldn't say anything now. But you don't want Bacon to get any publicity, do you?
Bate : No. But I don't think we can do nothing.
Ide : Why not?
Bate : Too many questions are being asked. That damned Internet! Is Carr right? Tell me, are you 100% certain that Cervantes wrote Don Quixote?
Ide : No. Can you wait before putting pen to paper?
Bate : Sooner or later we will have to come clean.
Ide : I'll write to you next week about this.
A week later .....

Bate : I am still waiting for your letter about Francis Carr's Who Wrote Don Quixote?
Ide : I'm sorry I have not got around to writing it.
Bate : The Telegraph rang me yesterday. They want to put my review in a special feature next month.
Ide : About what?
Bate : The Novel. They want to start with Don Quixote.
Ide : Oh dear!
Bate : They are suprised I have not said anything about Carr's book. I have asked them to postpone this feature. The press have been told not to review this book, and there has been very little advertising. But more and more of my students are asking me what I think of it.
Ide : What is your reply?
Bate : I would like to be able to tell them what you think. We have known about Cervantes, of course, for a long time. But we never encourage students to study Cervantes himself. When can you write to me?
Ide : Give me another week......

Jonathan Bate was educated at Sevenoaks School and the University of Cambridge. He teaches at Warwick University.His publications include Shakespeare and Ovid (1993), the Arden edition of Titus Andronicus (1995), The Genius of Shakespeare (1997), and he is currently editing a new edition of Shakespeare's Complete Works for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Winning and Losing

Competition creates losers. The losers naturally resent the winner, who deprives them of victory. In the race to win the real Shakespeare prize, all the contenders are----for the time being enjoying the challenge. The one event that they fear is defeat, when the winning post is reached. So it is natural that they refrain from giving their rivals any publicity. They would not review a book which supports someone who is not their favourite---unless, of course, they can rubbish it.
The Stratfordians, Oxfordians and Marlovians have all been struck dumb by Francis Carr's
Who Wrote Don Quixote. It clearly demonstrates Bacon's authorship of the Spanish novel and the Shakespeare plays. Attacks on Bacon's authorship claim are more difficult, so the professors prefer to keep their mouths shut. They have agreed with their Spanish counterparts perhaps that they will not uncover Bacon's authorship of Don Quixote, as that will also uncover his creation of the Shakespeare plays. With the publication of Carr's book the case for Bacon becomes even more difficult to refute. It is in fact impossible.

 
  • Like 3
  • Wow! 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Carr's book has just moved up on my list of books to read. If you Google Cervantes and jurisprudence, it is revealing and exciting. Here are three. 

----The Law in Cervantes and Shakespeare / María José Falcón y Tella.
Falcón y Tella, María José, author.
 
----The Quixote Principle, or Cervantes as a Critique of Law

Laurent de Sutter

Law and Literature
Vol. 26, No. 1 (SPRING 2014), pp. 117-126 (10 pages)
Published By: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
 
 
I have not read any of them, but surely it is a fascinating subject. Wish I had more time right now.
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/1/2024 at 2:30 AM, Lawrence Gerald said:

https://sirbacon.org/overheard.htm

This exchange appeared in Francis Carr's Fortnighly News Sheet between Professor Jonathan Bate, a British scholar of Shakespeare and Romanticism and Barry Ide, Cervantes Professor of Spanish at Stratford University :

 

Jonathan Bate : What do you think of Francis Carr's book, Who Wrote Don Quixote?
Barry Ide : I'd rather not say anything at the moment.
Bate : I've been asked by the Daily Telegraph to review it. Can you tell me if you think it's ridiculous?
Ide : I'd rather not comment, as you can understand.
Bate : If I don't write this review, they will think that Carr is right. Have they got in touch with you?
Ide : Yes, I told them I couldn't say anything now. But you don't want Bacon to get any publicity, do you?
Bate : No. But I don't think we can do nothing.
Ide : Why not?
Bate : Too many questions are being asked. That damned Internet! Is Carr right? Tell me, are you 100% certain that Cervantes wrote Don Quixote?
Ide : No. Can you wait before putting pen to paper?
Bate : Sooner or later we will have to come clean.
Ide : I'll write to you next week about this.
A week later .....

Bate : I am still waiting for your letter about Francis Carr's Who Wrote Don Quixote?
Ide : I'm sorry I have not got around to writing it.
Bate : The Telegraph rang me yesterday. They want to put my review in a special feature next month.
Ide : About what?
Bate : The Novel. They want to start with Don Quixote.
Ide : Oh dear!
Bate : They are suprised I have not said anything about Carr's book. I have asked them to postpone this feature. The press have been told not to review this book, and there has been very little advertising. But more and more of my students are asking me what I think of it.
Ide : What is your reply?
Bate : I would like to be able to tell them what you think. We have known about Cervantes, of course, for a long time. But we never encourage students to study Cervantes himself. When can you write to me?
Ide : Give me another week......

Jonathan Bate was educated at Sevenoaks School and the University of Cambridge. He teaches at Warwick University.His publications include Shakespeare and Ovid (1993), the Arden edition of Titus Andronicus (1995), The Genius of Shakespeare (1997), and he is currently editing a new edition of Shakespeare's Complete Works for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Winning and Losing

Competition creates losers. The losers naturally resent the winner, who deprives them of victory. In the race to win the real Shakespeare prize, all the contenders are----for the time being enjoying the challenge. The one event that they fear is defeat, when the winning post is reached. So it is natural that they refrain from giving their rivals any publicity. They would not review a book which supports someone who is not their favourite---unless, of course, they can rubbish it.
The Stratfordians, Oxfordians and Marlovians have all been struck dumb by Francis Carr's
Who Wrote Don Quixote. It clearly demonstrates Bacon's authorship of the Spanish novel and the Shakespeare plays. Attacks on Bacon's authorship claim are more difficult, so the professors prefer to keep their mouths shut. They have agreed with their Spanish counterparts perhaps that they will not uncover Bacon's authorship of Don Quixote, as that will also uncover his creation of the Shakespeare plays. With the publication of Carr's book the case for Bacon becomes even more difficult to refute. It is in fact impossible.

 

 

Thanks in part to SirBacon.org, Francis Carr's brilliance shines on: https://sirbacon.org/carrcrisis.htm

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

This exchange appeared in Francis Carr's Fortnighly News Sheet between Professor Jonathan Bate, a British scholar of Shakespeare and Romanticism and Barry Ide, Cervantes Professor of Spanish at Stratford University :

Any idea how this conversation made its way to Francis Carr? I just read Francis Carr's "The Impending Crisis." https://sirbacon.org/carrcrisis.htm.  I have always thought that academic scholars would welcome having the authorship controversy opened up. It would give them lots of new things to write about.

Edited by Christie Waldman
typo
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This Carr page may have already been mentioned, so apologize if I am being redundant. Below the link is one paragraph that sums up a lot.

https://sirbacon.org/links/carrlegalquixote.html

Strangely enough, there is no evidence that either Cervantes or Shakespeare had any legal training. If they had been to a law school or had worked as a lawyer for even a brief period, some record of such attendance or membership would have been written down. Even if Shakespeare had been merely a lawyer's clerk, which some Shakespeareans hazardously suggest, we could at least expect that someone would have recorded that the great playwright was once employed in a certain lawyer's chamber. The records have been examined for such evidence, but nothing has been found. Spanish historians have met with similar lack of success in finding anything to suggest that Cervantes once worked in any law office. He was twice imprisoned for commandeering wheat from land owned by the Church and for discrepancies in his accounts as a government fodder collector. But such contact with the law is surely insufficient for any serious law student. A further brush with the law occurred in 1605, five months after the publication of Don Quixote when he found himself in gaol for a couple of days, accused of complicity in the death of a young nobleman outside Cervantes's house in Valladolid. As Miguel was perhaps using his house as a brothel at the time, the police thought, without sufficient evidence, that he may have been the murderer.

  • Like 4

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In "The Writer's Finger Prints: Francis Carr Explores the Legal Link Between Quixote and Shakespeare," https://sirbacon.org/links/carrlegalquixote.html Carr mentioned Mark Edwin Andrews' book, Law versus Equity in The Merchant of Venice: A Legalization of Act IV, Scene 1 (Boulder: University of Colorado Press, 1965). It can be read on the Internet Archive. Andrews was Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President Truman. Here's his military biography. https://www.history.navy.mil/research/library/research-guides/modern-biographical-files-ndl/modern-bios-a/andrews-mark-edwin.html

When Carr writes, "Shakespeare's views harmonized perfectly with recognized court procedure of the time," he is quoting from U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harlan F. Stone's letter to Andrews in 1937 after he had examined the manuscript, quoted in the book's preface by editor J. K. Emery,

"Often, in listening to The Merchant of Venice, it has occurred to me that Shakespeare knew the essentials of the contemporary conflict between law and equity. But until I read your manuscript I had never realized how completely the play harmonized with recognized court procedure of the time. You have done an admirable piece of work." (ix)

In my opinion--and I'm sure I"m not alone--there is much more going on inside this play than what appears on the surface. Yes, the play's author understood court procedure, the jurisdictional conflict between the courts of equity and the courts of law at the time. But his purpose in writing the play went far deeper than that, I believe. Academic Shakespeare scholar Marjorie Garber wrote that The Merchant of Venice was a play about decipherment.

It is good that Carr drew attention to Andrews' book. It is a worthy book. I first saw it around 1980 and never forgot it. Andrews wrote his manuscript in 1935 (having begun his research in a summer Shakespeare class he took when he was a law student). It was rediscovered and published in 1965. It was 15 years later that I first saw it as an undergraduate. What are the odds, really, of that happening? Thirty-five years after that, in 2015, at Lawrence's invitation, I began to write a review of it for SirBacon, and my research turned into my 2018 book. The flame of this spirit of equity must be kept alive if humane civilization is to survive and thrive (in my opinion). The more we learn, the enormity of Shakespeare's accomplishment, in a time of political oppression and censorship, cannot cease to amaze us.

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...