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boys 'n toys make mucho noise


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Hi folks, good day and many greetings to all.

 

I am doing some research into an ancient child's toy called a whirligig.

If anyone can throw some photons on this subject I would greatly appreciate it.

See images below:

billingsleytop.png.c60b2e147a6d30130c2095dc342ed63c.png

Taken from top of title page of Euclid's Elements by Billingsley.  Note the little boy with his rotary wind toy. Notice also the winged Time figure with his scythe who is also present in New Atlantis circular title image.

DP818429.jpg.5df3303bdb91bf4bd7727f6883c37f47.jpg

This fine looking purveyor is a French whirligig seller.

Anyone seen other examples of these wind-powered toys?

😀

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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3 hours ago, peethagoras said:

Anyone seen other examples of these wind-powered toys?

I have a childhood memory of a whirligig, or whirligigs, somewhere. Was it the Smithsonian in Washington DC during middle-school field-trips that always left an impression?

I am not sure.

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Hi Peethagoras,

I imagine that your interest in whirligig is link to the "whirlegigge of Time" 🙂 .

(Twelfe Night,or, what you Will - Act V scene 1)

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/293/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

image.png.e14fb5a240ab839f0ea8780af4bed199.png

(Notice that "whirlegigge" is the 33rd word of the column.)

I remember that when I discovered that the Kay cipher of "Lotd" was 74, I wondered if the "t" instead of "r" was really an error.

Anyway, to answer to your request, here is something that I noticed few years ago in Emblemata Sacra by Daniel Cramer (1624).

IMG_20240224_223817.jpg.ea1aae1b2b757b5280a6fccfb616305b.jpg

https://www.arkeotopia.org/en/resources/94-blog/235-ressources-article-medieval-toys.html

And personally, talking about the whirligig of Time , I like this postcard  designed by ... Robert Dudley ! 😉 

Cover design, Christmas cards, Whirligig of Time For sale as Framed Prints,  Photos, Wall Art and Photo Gifts

 

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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On 2/24/2024 at 10:18 PM, Allisnum2er said:

I imagine that your interest in whirligig is link to the "whirlegigge of Time"

Hi again Allisnum2er.

Thanks for the splendid images etc. The early one is of particular value. My interest stems mainly from the image at  the top of title page of Euclid's Elements by Billingsley/Dee. I noted the winged Time figure which brought to mind the circular image on the title page of New Atlantis. The old man reminded me of John Dee, and the younger man Bacon. The lead figure is a boy with a whirligig, boys play with toys (Richard 3: the alphabet "toy")  and this made me think of the book of Job like this:

BOY ==> BOI  his toy turns in the wind: ==> IOB   (Job).

There are some references to boys and the abc in Shakespeare, and the abc is even found in BACON. The hints about Bacon and 'boys' may well be applied here.

If the letters could turn like a whirligig in the wind, then why not turn the abc values of  I   O   B   ==>    9  14  2 :

turns around (14  2)  to make 14 29

4 turns around 1 to make 41

So finally we have Job 41:29

 

IMHO that is.  😄

 

In passing: You are probably right about Lotd, what else could it be? I wonder if that Robert Dudley was related?

Also, ref Emblemata Sacra :

When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.

I Corinthians 13:11

Not much fun in the bible.

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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Hi Peethagoras,

You say :

"My interest stems mainly from the image at  the top of title page of Euclid's Elements by Billingsley/Dee. I noted the winged Time figure which brought to mind the circular image on the title page of New Atlantis. The old man reminded me of John Dee, and the younger man Bacon."

Do you know that this title page of Euclid's Elements is based on the title page of "Cosmographical glasses" published in 1559 ?

https://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/PR-L-AST-00009-00044-C-00005/1

In 1559, Francis Bacon was not born yet.

This title page was also used much later for several books of songs by John Dowland.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_First_Book_of_Songs_(1597)

 

In regard to your reference to JOB 41:29 the problem is that King James Bible was published in 1611.

Prior, to the King James Bible, we have the Geneva Bible (1560) and the Tyndale Bible (1526) written in English.

The Tyndale Bible is a translation of the New Testament, which means that we can find a translation of Job in english only in the Geneva Bible.

The fact is that the Geneva Bible already mentions "the shaking of the speare" in 1560, but this is not in JOB 41:29.

This is JOB 41:20

https://studybible.info/Geneva/Job 41

 

Another name given to the whirligig was scopperel.

https://anjasquest.wordpress.com/tasks/toys/active-play-toys/hobby-horses-and-scopperels/

You will find more image with this word.

http://ludopetit.com/ateliers/page-d-exemple/moulin-a-vent-du-moyen-age/

(Notice, amongst the images, the one of the boy with a whirligig on the back of a Boar 🙂 )

 

"When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things."

I Corinthians 13:11

This is not the case of the FOOL. 😉 

That is the reason why you will find images of a fool with a stick-horse and a scopperel.

Pazzia_1764-1767_Perugia_pag.347_tom.IV_

PAZZIA means folly or madness

 

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Do you know that this title page of Euclid's Elements is based on the title page of "Cosmographical glasses" published in 1559 ?

Yes indeed I do. Billinglsley used the title page printing block after some changes, to suit his (and Dee's) own purposes. You may have noticed that I said I was reminded of Bacon and Dee.

 

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

The fact is that the Geneva Bible already mentions "the shaking of the speare" in 1560, but this is not in JOB 41:29.

Hi Allisnum2er.

Yes, the Geneva has no verse 29, but of course the King James version does. I imagine that those who were involved with the King James version (one being our friend FB) would have hoped someone might land on Job 41:29, after 1611, or perhaps around 1623. There is a ciphered BOY in the Stratford epitaph which might point to Job.  That would take great patience to see it, and by that method lead again to Job 41:29.

I once read somewhere that the King James version was installed in all churches, so it was far easier to access than the Geneva version, they would have been on the library shelf of some rich individuals.

Thanks for the images, I do appreciate your sharing. I did note the boy on the boar 😀

 

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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