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Marvin Haines - Who is That Crazy Kid??


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My name is Marvin Haines. I'm sure everyone here knows me already, but I decided to make this post anyway - just for the proverbial hell of it.

I'm (currently) 17 years old. I was 15 when I first joined the B'Hive, and I've learned a lot in the past few years.

My interest in Bacon/Shakespeare began a little over three years ago. It was Sarah Winchester - perhaps the most interesting (and misunderstood) Baconian of the last century - who really got me started down this rabbit hole. Despite never having visited Llanada Villa, her notorious House, I had been fascinated by it since the third grade. (I've always loved historic American architecture, and Queen Anne style has long been a favorite. The House is, in my humble opinion, the greatest example of this style in the country.)

When I first heard about Mrs. Winchester, I fully accepted the sensationalized legend that has become synonymous with her name. My 8-year-old brain was desperately confused. I loved "spooky" stories, and I ate the legend up. I drew the house from every angle, fascinated with its bizarre design - in particular, its 7-story appearance before the 1906 earthquake muddled it up. I was (and still am) very well-versed in the High and Late Victorian styles, so drawing it was a simple enough task.

At some point, maybe around 6th grade, I started to realize how inaccurate the "Folklore" was. The more I thought, the more I began to suspect that something was missing from the age-old story. But without context, I had no idea what it was.

I discovered Richard Allan Wagner's superb article, "The Truth About Sarah Winchester," early in 9th grade, not long after my infamous 3-month hiatus in the mental health system, (during which I was diagnosed with autism and extreme OCD). The article, if you haven't read it, is a stroke of mind-boggling genius. I had so many questions: Who was this Francis Bacon character? Why was Mrs. Winchester so obsessed with him? Is there anyone else who believes this theory?

I just went with it, and pretty soon, I was convinced.

I've written and illustrated a pamphlet, which I hope will be a companion to Wagner's work. I've cleared up some of his apparent mistakes and completely analyzed the House from an architectural (as well as symbolic) perspective, with particular emphasis on its pre-1906 configuration.

A little over a year ago, I dropped out of High School after nearly being expelled. (Believe me, that's a long and painful story.) I spend most of my time writing, playing the piano, dreaming up architectural designs, and pursuing esoteric knowledge. I'm soon to traditionally publish my first novel, The Life of Arti Usher. I'm also a member of the Oregon Repertory Singers Youth Choir, and I sing regularly.

Ok. Enough yapping. Here are some things I like:

Sir Francis Bacon/Shakespeare

Sarah Winchester/Llanada Villa

Bow ties (usually bright colors) - I wear them almost every day

High and Late Victorian architecture (Second Empire, Queen Anne, etc.)

Palladian architecture

Gothic architecture

Warm scarves and leather gloves

Goggles (worn as a fashion accessory)

Fish & Chips

Sushi

Suits, sweater-vests, etc.

Ragtime

Edward Gorey

Everything related to Edward Gorey

Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, and All the Wrong Questions

The Shining (first adaptation)

Fantastic Mr. Fox (the only adaptation)

Dr. Strangelove; or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

...and many more things that I won't bother to list!

 

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6 hours ago, Marvin Haines said:

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Hey Marvin, do you happen to have any links to old books on Elizabethan architectural ornament design? Decorative mouldings, that sort of thing. Could also be Italian Renaissance. If so, could you please post them here. Much obliged! 

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One of Marvin's list of  likes : Dr. Strangelove; or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

 

Hi Marvin,
One of our generous contributors to sirbacon.org has been the writer,  Harvey Wheeler,  a life long admirer of the political philosophy and Constitutional law  writings of Francis Bacon. Harvey  also co wrote a very successful  novel, "Fail Safe" which was adapted to make the screenplay for Dr. Strangeglove.

 

Fail-Safe (1962) Eugene Burdick & Harvey Wheeler, McGraw Hill; Re-published, 1999, by Ecco Press, now part of Harper-Collins.

https://sirbacon.org/wheelerbooks.html

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Eric!

With regard to your question, I would have to recommend Andrea Palladio's Quatre Libre Dell'Architettura (Four Books of Architecture.) I've read much of it... It can be rather daunting and information-heavy, with all the precise units, modules, dimensions etc. Palladio was a great architect. He was a contemporary of Bacon and singlehandedly fathered a style of Classicism known as Palladianism. His villas are often mislabeled as "baroque," but in terms of design, they are about as far as you can get from Baroque without exiting the Classical realm. Palladianism was briefly taken up in England in the 17th century, but was superseded by Georgian Classicism in the 1700s. Christopher Wren would occasionally use elements of it, but a more quintessentially British Palladian architect would be the 3d Earl of Burlington, whose Masonic-inspired Chiswick House draws heavily on Palladio's Villa Rotunda. Sorry for the ramble.

If you want a more approachable work on Classical Design, check out The American Vignola, by William Ware. It outlines the Classical system in much simpler terms than Quatre Libre, while somehow still delivering the same essential information. It's a remarkable book, also heavily illustrated, and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in Classical design.

As for Elizabethan architecture, I can't say I'm an expert on it, nor would I know of any book that might help you learn more about it... I can say that it was the first post-Roman period in English architecture to make use of the Classical System.

I don't know if Quatre Libre is available in PDF format - I assume it is. I'm going for a walk now, but I'll look after.

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11 hours ago, Marvin Haines said:

Eric!

With regard to your question, I would have to recommend Andrea Palladio's Quatre Libre Dell'Architettura (Four Books of Architecture.) I've read much of it... It can be rather daunting and information-heavy, with all the precise units, modules, dimensions etc. Palladio was a great architect. He was a contemporary of Bacon and singlehandedly fathered a style of Classicism known as Palladianism. His villas are often mislabeled as "baroque," but in terms of design, they are about as far as you can get from Baroque without exiting the Classical realm. Palladianism was briefly taken up in England in the 17th century, but was superseded by Georgian Classicism in the 1700s. Christopher Wren would occasionally use elements of it, but a more quintessentially British Palladian architect would be the 3d Earl of Burlington, whose Masonic-inspired Chiswick House draws heavily on Palladio's Villa Rotunda. Sorry for the ramble.

If you want a more approachable work on Classical Design, check out The American Vignola, by William Ware. It outlines the Classical system in much simpler terms than Quatre Libre, while somehow still delivering the same essential information. It's a remarkable book, also heavily illustrated, and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in Classical design.

As for Elizabethan architecture, I can't say I'm an expert on it, nor would I know of any book that might help you learn more about it... I can say that it was the first post-Roman period in English architecture to make use of the Classical System.

I don't know if Quatre Libre is available in PDF format - I assume it is. I'm going for a walk now, but I'll look after.

Hi Marvin

Very incisive, erudite and helpful. I knew that you would know some of the best references on classical architecture. Many Thanks!

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On 2/15/2024 at 10:42 PM, Marvin Haines said:

My name is Marvin Haines. I'm sure everyone here knows me already, but I decided to make this post anyway - just for the proverbial hell of it.

I'm (currently) 17 years old. I was 15 when I first joined the B'Hive, and I've learned a lot in the past few years.

You may be a Crazy Kid, at the very least quite Unique. LOL
 

On 2/15/2024 at 10:42 PM, Marvin Haines said:

A little over a year ago, I dropped out of High School after nearly being expelled. (Believe me, that's a long and painful story.) I spend most of my time writing, playing the piano, dreaming up architectural designs, and pursuing esoteric knowledge.

Bright colored bow ties and goggles, no wonder they almost kicked you out of school. LOL

Plus you were probably smarter than all of the teaching and administrative staff which had to have created some issues.

Have you considered attending the University of Amsterdam in their Western Esotericism program?

https://www.uva.nl/en/discipline/religious-studies/western-esotericism/article.html?cb

The UvA is the only university to offer a specialisation in Western esotericism. A series of courses at the Bachelor’s level are offered as part of the Religiewetenschappen programme. This cluster can also be taken in the form of a minor. At the Master’s level, a specialisation in Western esotericism is possible within the one-year programme Spirituality and Religion and the two-year research master’s Religious Studies.

Due to its interdisciplinary approach, the Research Master’s forms the perfect starting point for eventual PhD research within virtually all humanities disciplines.

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
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On 2/17/2024 at 10:24 AM, Marvin Haines said:

Eric!

With regard to your question, I would have to recommend Andrea Palladio's Quatre Libre Dell'Architettura (Four Books of Architecture.) I've read much of it... It can be rather daunting and information-heavy, with all the precise units, modules, dimensions etc. Palladio was a great architect. He was a contemporary of Bacon and singlehandedly fathered a style of Classicism known as Palladianism. His villas are often mislabeled as "baroque," but in terms of design, they are about as far as you can get from Baroque without exiting the Classical realm. Palladianism was briefly taken up in England in the 17th century, but was superseded by Georgian Classicism in the 1700s. Christopher Wren would occasionally use elements of it, but a more quintessentially British Palladian architect would be the 3d Earl of Burlington, whose Masonic-inspired Chiswick House draws heavily on Palladio's Villa Rotunda. Sorry for the ramble.

If you want a more approachable work on Classical Design, check out The American Vignola, by William Ware. It outlines the Classical system in much simpler terms than Quatre Libre, while somehow still delivering the same essential information. It's a remarkable book, also heavily illustrated, and I'd recommend it to anyone interested in Classical design.

As for Elizabethan architecture, I can't say I'm an expert on it, nor would I know of any book that might help you learn more about it... I can say that it was the first post-Roman period in English architecture to make use of the Classical System.

I don't know if Quatre Libre is available in PDF format - I assume it is. I'm going for a walk now, but I'll look after.

Thanks Marvin! 

Palladio's Quatre Libre Dell'Architecttura is amazing. 

It must be one of the most influential architectural 'manuals' ever published.

https://archive.org/details/iquattrolibridel01pall/page/n183/mode/2up

American Vignola is more of a text book but interesting nevertheless.

https://archive.org/details/cu31924091026504/page/n73/mode/2up

 

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