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Baconian Ciphers - Misc.


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HAMLET

The Tragedy of Hamlet shadows the most explosive and sensational secrets of the Elizabethan reign in which the not so Virgin Queen was secretly married to Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom she produced two concealed royal princes Francis Tudor Bacon and Robert Tudor Devereux. It tells the tale of its author a disinherited royal prince Francis Tudor Bacon in the shape of Hamlet who is denied his rightful kingship by his mother Queen Elizabeth and the exhaustion and death of the Tudor dynasty. Behind its dramatis personae lies the leading figures of the Elizabethan period: Francis Bacon Tudor concealed Prince of Wales (Prince Hamlet), Queen Elizabeth Tudor (Queen Gertrude) and her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (King Claudius), Robert Tudor Devereux (Laertes), Sir Nicholas Bacon (the Ghost of Old Hamlet) and Sir William Cecil (Polonius).

 
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The first scene of Hamlet is set in darkness at midnight with its associated themes of secrecy and concealed identity. The pregnant stage direction ‘Enter Barnardo, and Francisco, two Centinels’ is followed by Barnardo asking Francisco the profoundly meaningful question in the first line of the play ‘Who’s there?’ (1:1:1). The name Francisco is the Spanish/Portuguese form of the English name Francis. The name of the sentinel Francisco (Francis) alongside the chosen name of the other sentinel Barnardo (Barnard in English) is doubly significant. The names Francis and Barnard possess the Christian name of Bacon and the initials of Francis Bacon. The names Francisco and Barnardo also contain an anagram of Francis Bacon. To the meaningly profound question then ‘Who’s there’, the answer is Francis Bacon, secret concealed author of The Tragical Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.

Interspersed throughout the greatest tragedy in world literature telling the story of the demise of the Tudor dynasty are lines, sentences and passages identical in thought and similar in expression, providing resemblances, correspondences and parallels from more than thirty of Bacon’s writings, among them: unpublished manuscripts, private letters and speeches; various essays including Of Revenge and Of Death, the two key themes of the play; as well as An Inquiry Concerning the Ways of Death and The History of Life and Death; short occasional pieces Physiological Remains and Short Notes for Civil Conversation; political works A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of the Kingdom of England and Scotland and The Case of the Post-Nati of Scotland as well as the state sanctioned A Declaration of the Practices and Treasons of the Earl of Essex; his philosophical and scientific treatises The Advancement of Learning, Wisdom of the Ancients, Novum Organum, De Augmentis Scientiarum and Sylva Sylvarum; and several of his obscure relatively unknown and unread legal treatises A Discourse upon the Commission of Bridewell, The Argument in Lowe’s Case of Tenures, The Charge of Owen Indicted for High Treason, The Reading Upon the Statues of Uses, The Maxims of the Common Law and The Ordinances made by Lord Chancellor Bacon in Chancery.
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16 hours ago, CAB said:

Bar. Who’s there?

Fran. Nay answer me: Stand & unfold your selfe.

Bar. Long live the King.

Fran. Barnardo?

Bar. He.

Fran. You come most carefully upon your houre.

(see first image)

It struck me that the term “unfold” is the inverse of the one Bacon himself used when discussing encryption in his Bi-literarie Alphabet: “It containeth the highest degree of Cypher, which is to signifie omnia per omnia, yet so as the writing infolding, may beare a quintuple proportion to the writing infolded; no other condition or restriction whatsoever is required.” This is found on page 265 of 1640 The Advancement of Learning.  (see second image)

Now, the word “unfold” is used elsewhere by Shakespeare to mean “disclose” and here it would mean the same. But it can have an extra meaning, as Bacon himself would be likely to use, and then “unfold your self” can mean “decipher (literally) your identity”. 

Thank you again for sharing CAB.

And thank you A Phoenix for that indispensable reminder. 🙏

CAB, here is one suggestion based on your unfold/infold idea, with fran. 33 

As I read through your post, I wondered if Bacon could have used the same principle in the very first sentence beginning with Fran. and mentioning "unfold yourself".

The fact is that after Fran. there are ... 32 letters ... off by one.

But what if "&" was the key ?

Indeed "&" was used instead of "and".

undefined

Gilles-Marie Oppenord (1672-1742), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampersand

The Ampersand is originated as a ligature of "et".

Maybe (and this is just an idea) are we asking to count "&" as 2 (et).

In this way, " Fran. Nay answer me: Stand & unfold your selfe." => Fran. 33

 

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Great comments. Nice insight Light-of-Truth. A Phoenix, I hadn't seen these relationships before-Thanks very much. Also, re the listing of related Bacon writings, he also wrote on the topic of Dueling, which could connect to the play, correct? Allisnum2er, good catch on that '&' usage. Very possibly intentional! Thanks for sharing!

--------------

I had mentioned a cipher candidate on page 67 of the Comedies. Well, on page 67 of the Histories,  in the play of The First Part of King Henry the Fourth, in the first column, about 13 lines from the bottom is “S. Albones”, referring to Saint Albans.

If we know then that Bacon, would sign his name according to his title, then we can see his signature of “Francis St. Albans” in two parts (the page number and the town) on the page. Keep in mind that Bacon wrote that ciphers should be “without suspicion” and that ciphering is “an Art” requiring “a good witt” (pg. 270 of the 1640 Advancement). Below are screen shots showing his signature after he became Baron Verulam in 1618. And then after he became Viscount St Alban in 1621.

And here is an instance of the spelling of St. Albones instead of Albans from outside of Bacon's writings:

 

“one way, but the Wife goeth another. . . .

He lost his Peerage and Seal, and the Scale was wavering

whether he should carry the Tide of Viscount St. Albones  to his

grave, and that was all he did ; having only left a poor empty

fyeing, which lasted not long with him, his honour dying before him. “

The town is spelt 5 ways in the First Folio: Albans, Albones, Albone, Albons, Albon. Not counting the Parts 2 and 3 of Henry VI, as well as the play Richard III, which all have either a scene set in St. Albans or references to it related to the historical War of the Roses, there are 199 pages that could have it mentioned (since they all take place in England). These pages are from King John, Richard II, Henry Fourth parts I and II, Henry V, Henry VIII, Henry VI part 1, and Merry Wives of Windsor. In these 199 pages St. Albans is only mentioned twice, on pages 67 and 81, neither time being any kind of historical reference. Only primary  significant signature page numbers of 33, 67, 100, and 111 exist within this set and only 67 (Francis) would provide the counterpart for his St Albans’ signature. The mentioning of St. Albans on page 81 is even of some minor interest because the line directly across from it has 33 letters. Possibly his name is encoded in some additional place on page if anyone cares to search further.

 

 

 

 

Fr_Verulam.jpg

Fr_St_Alban.jpg

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On 2/28/2024 at 10:08 PM, CAB said:

Thank you again A Phoenix and Eric for adding to an understanding of the play. And Allisnum2, that really is something in all that can be found in closer examinations of the texts. It seems amazing that Bacon could have planned it all out but I think he was genius enough to do just that - add in various ciphers as he is writing or possibly also as he helped in preparing the pages for printing.

-------------------

This next signature candidate is found on the first page of Hamlet in the folio (Page 152 of the Tragedies) where it begins with another question of identity. This may have been posted before somewhere on this site, in which case I am merely adding my own commentary on it. The character Barnardo, a sentinel at Ellsinore castle, is relieving his fellow sentinel “Francisco”. As in a couple of earlier examples our thoughts are primed with a name like Francis in a context of uncertain identity. Francisco responds to Barnado and there is this exchange:

 

Bar. Who’s there?

Fran. Nay answer me: Stand & unfold your selfe.

Bar. Long live the King.

Fran. Barnardo?

Bar. He.

Fran. You come most carefully upon your houre.

(see first image)

It struck me that the term “unfold” is the inverse of the one Bacon himself used when discussing encryption in his Bi-literarie Alphabet: “It containeth the highest degree of Cypher, which is to signifie omnia per omnia, yet so as the writing infolding, may beare a quintuple proportion to the writing infolded; no other condition or restriction whatsoever is required.” This is found on page 265 of 1640 The Advancement of Learning.  (see second image)

Now, the word “unfold” is used elsewhere by Shakespeare to mean “disclose” and here it would mean the same. But it can have an extra meaning, as Bacon himself would be likely to use, and then “unfold your self” can mean “decipher (literally) your identity”.  Again, the variation of the name of Francis (in “Francisco”) at this important point in the text, with a question of identity, and a demand to reveal oneself using cipher terminology that Bacon has used, then followed closely by a phrase with one of the numerical counts for a Bacon signature, does seem to be an unlikely coincidence. This is the only scene in the play with Francisco in it. The name of Francis, or a variation on it, is only slightly used by Shakespeare and the few times that it is used there seem to be hidden signatures connected with it. Incidentally, the Friedmans also used the term ‘unfold’ in their book. On page 261 they write “What this meant, in all probability, was that in any given case the sense of the message as it unfolded itself would dictate whether a letter should be assigned …”

In this case we have “Fran” and then a letter count of 33, which can allude to “Francis Bacon”. This line is the only one in this column (I didn’t check the second column) with a letter count of 33. 

We can further the suspicion if we refer to non-cipher evidence connecting Bacon to this play. He’s the only authorship candidate known to have read the play’s main source from the Norse tale by Saxo Grammaticus. This source was not printed in English until 1608, after the known date of the play. Bacon, of course, could easily have read the French version, while the actor from Stratford would not be able to, nor likely have it read to him by another:

There are also numerous language and legal idea parallels of the play related to Bacon’s writings which increase the probability of this being an intentionally coded signature.

 

 

 

Unfoldyourself.jpg

Unfold2.jpg

It's not unreasonable to think that the character names are chosen to give another level of meaning. I considered this portion of the play recently for another reason and was triggered in another way. Who are the sentinels (the guards) possibly referring to in a figurative sense? The names may be a clue. Francisco may point us to the Franciscans who acted as the sentinels of papal powers as inquisitiors with the Dominicans. Barnardo certainly does recall the most famous of the Dominican inquisitors, Bernardo Gui.

"Stand and unfold yourself" is a pretty accurate description of what it meant to be put in front of the Inquisition and to be laid bare. It's reminiscent of one's final judgement. 

The words "Long live the King " are Biblically inspired. I believe they come from the book of Daniel 2:4 (a book of end times prophecy). The King here is signaling out God, as it is Nebuchadnezzar who is expressing this to Daniel. 

The line which you point out is very evocative of the idea of "one coming upon his hour". That is to say, approaching death and judgment. The fact that it has 33 letters is only too supportive of the fact that this may be a correct interpretation.  Jesus "came upon his hour" at the age of 33. This was a very strong symbolic idea behind 33 for Christians. It is a number which repeats the 3 of the trinity. it has a meaning which is often tied to a perfect time or place.

The fact we are also coming upon page 153 is also significant in my estimation. 153 is that perfect number which is associated with the perfection of the soul in heaven. On a 360 degree circle 153 and 333 stand opposite. The pair was always assumed to have had very strong symbolic value (3 x 3 is a trinity of threes). You will come across the major emphasis that 3 ^ 3 was given also. 27 is a great Masonic carrier of meaning.

Like so many of the "clues" we see in Shakespeare there appears to be an awful lot of this obsessing over death (a Protestant obsession). It's not surprising because it was very much in vogue to reevaluate this for Protestants who stood against papal power.

It's easy to get put on many different paths with 33.  I've encountered it in many places. You'll find that Jerusalem is 33.3 degrees East of Paris, for example. 

BTW, that section starts with a W given as two Vees. This we could suspect is involving the Latin "Vivat" which stands for "long live". The other V is typically Veritas paired with it. Vivat Veritas=long live the Truth .The truth is a Christian Truth.

A "hamlet" is a small village or outpost. It' s possible to think that England itself was being signaled as being a tiny remaining hamlet of the Truth.

One could probably argue that it is not in the character of the Shakespeare from Stratford to be saying this sort of thing. This is much more in the vein of a true zealot. I'm not exactly sure how deep Bacon's beliefs ran. If he was a Rosicrucian then he had some differing point of belief about the End times which would have clashed with other Protestants.

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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11 hours ago, CAB said:

Great comments. Nice insight Light-of-Truth. A Phoenix, I hadn't seen these relationships before-Thanks very much. Also, re the listing of related Bacon writings, he also wrote on the topic of Dueling, which could connect to the play, correct? Allisnum2er, good catch on that '&' usage. Very possibly intentional! Thanks for sharing!

--------------

I had mentioned a cipher candidate on page 67 of the Comedies. Well, on page 67 of the Histories,  in the play of The First Part of King Henry the Fourth, in the first column, about 13 lines from the bottom is “S. Albones”, referring to Saint Albans.

If we know then that Bacon, would sign his name according to his title, then we can see his signature of “Francis St. Albans” in two parts (the page number and the town) on the page. Keep in mind that Bacon wrote that ciphers should be “without suspicion” and that ciphering is “an Art” requiring “a good witt” (pg. 270 of the 1640 Advancement). Below are screen shots showing his signature after he became Baron Verulam in 1618. And then after he became Viscount St Alban in 1621.

And here is an instance of the spelling of St. Albones instead of Albans from outside of Bacon's writings:

 

“one way, but the Wife goeth another. . . .

He lost his Peerage and Seal, and the Scale was wavering

whether he should carry the Tide of Viscount St. Albones  to his

grave, and that was all he did ; having only left a poor empty

fyeing, which lasted not long with him, his honour dying before him. “

The town is spelt 5 ways in the First Folio: Albans, Albones, Albone, Albons, Albon. Not counting the Parts 2 and 3 of Henry VI, as well as the play Richard III, which all have either a scene set in St. Albans or references to it related to the historical War of the Roses, there are 199 pages that could have it mentioned (since they all take place in England). These pages are from King John, Richard II, Henry Fourth parts I and II, Henry V, Henry VIII, Henry VI part 1, and Merry Wives of Windsor. In these 199 pages St. Albans is only mentioned twice, on pages 67 and 81, neither time being any kind of historical reference. Only primary  significant signature page numbers of 33, 67, 100, and 111 exist within this set and only 67 (Francis) would provide the counterpart for his St Albans’ signature. The mentioning of St. Albans on page 81 is even of some minor interest because the line directly across from it has 33 letters. Possibly his name is encoded in some additional place on page if anyone cares to search further.

 

 

 

 

Fr_Verulam.jpg

Fr_St_Alban.jpg

Be careful. Bacon certainly understood that a cipher had to be well hidden, but he also understood that it had to have a clear solution (be explicitly decipherable). Where there is the least bit of subjective leeway there is no powerful cipher. 

The witt cannot reasonably apply to the deciphering, but it can to the hiding. This we have covered often with his bi-lateral cipher which is incredibly easy to hide using any covert binary. With a proper key the solution is precisely given.

A cipher that has many possible solutions is akin to a suggestion generating machine. Who would go out of his way to be so imprecise? Maybe one playing games.

It's possible that someone is in fact bombarding us with suggestions, but I see no easy way to narrow them down to anything specific. Finding Bacon suggested all over the printed works does not tell you if he is being presented as the author of the works, an exploiter or partner of Shakespeare or a mastermind behind a collective undertaking, for example. 

A lot of the artifices we get presented with are related to the First Folio printing layout. What is to stop us from thinking that Bacon may have had an involvement in that only?

There are many ways to convince one's self and/or poke holes in ideas when there are only suggestions. Some of the suggestions you will encounter are more palatable than others, meaning that there is an obvious need to not take too many liberties.  I've often expressed that there is no shortage of opportunity to state that Francis Bacon was Jesus Christ if we are going to rely only of what is possible to suggest and what might want to be believed.

It would be a great coup to find a bi-lateral cipher that was explicitly stating something of the grandeur that some suggest is being given by less. So far, I have seen only collections of things which are stacked in an effort to build an impressive pyramid of hope. To say that some dearly hope that Bacon wrote Shakespeare is not an exaggeration. There is even what I call "hope beyond hope" in some instances. 

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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5 hours ago, CAB said:

The mentioning of St. Albans on page 81 is even of some minor interest because the line directly across from it has 33 letters. Possibly his name is encoded in some additional place on page if anyone cares to search further.

I have your answer CAB ! 😉 

This is something that I noticed as I was researching about the use of the letter "yogh" instead of a letter "B" in the First Folio.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/401/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

image.png.793c8f4d2549c65e791677d8d53f1908.png

Franke (Francis) Bore (Bacon)

Notice that these are lines 61 and 62.

In my view, 61 is the simple cipher of JANUS and 62 is F.B.

Interestingly, 61 + 62 = 123 with 1+2+3=6  (F.BAC.)

image.png.e7d3b569609af9bd5a505fbc27d525f8.png

Prince F. BAC

"A Crownes-worth of good Interpretation" contains 33 letters.

Prince. 33

You will probably tell me "I do not see any yogh !"😊

Indeed! In this copy of the First Folio a vertical line was added but not in the following one ...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/401/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.dd897d5a0fddbbc02774746621d7b0f8.png

The letter yogh or ȝoȝ was used in the middle english and it hides the number 33.

33 = BACON

I shared one part of my research on the page 303 of the First Folio and its link with The myth of Icarus and "mediocria firma"(Francis Bacon's motto) at the end of my video "Filum Labyrinthi".

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/811/index.html%3Fzoom=1275.html

EDIT :

"In these 199 pages St. Albans is only mentioned twice, on pages 67 and 81, neither time being any kind of historical reference."

67 + 81 = 148

148 is the simple cipher of ...

WILLIAM TUDOR

😊

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8 hours ago, CAB said:

Great comments. Nice insight Light-of-Truth. A Phoenix, I hadn't seen these relationships before-Thanks very much. Also, re the listing of related Bacon writings, he also wrote on the topic of Dueling, which could connect to the play, correct? Allisnum2er, good catch on that '&' usage. Very possibly intentional! Thanks for sharing!

--------------

I had mentioned a cipher candidate on page 67 of the Comedies. Well, on page 67 of the Histories,  in the play of The First Part of King Henry the Fourth, in the first column, about 13 lines from the bottom is “S. Albones”, referring to Saint Albans.

If we know then that Bacon, would sign his name according to his title, then we can see his signature of “Francis St. Albans” in two parts (the page number and the town) on the page. Keep in mind that Bacon wrote that ciphers should be “without suspicion” and that ciphering is “an Art” requiring “a good witt” (pg. 270 of the 1640 Advancement). Below are screen shots showing his signature after he became Baron Verulam in 1618. And then after he became Viscount St Alban in 1621.

And here is an instance of the spelling of St. Albones instead of Albans from outside of Bacon's writings:

 

“one way, but the Wife goeth another. . . .

He lost his Peerage and Seal, and the Scale was wavering

whether he should carry the Tide of Viscount St. Albones  to his

grave, and that was all he did ; having only left a poor empty

fyeing, which lasted not long with him, his honour dying before him. “

The town is spelt 5 ways in the First Folio: Albans, Albones, Albone, Albons, Albon. Not counting the Parts 2 and 3 of Henry VI, as well as the play Richard III, which all have either a scene set in St. Albans or references to it related to the historical War of the Roses, there are 199 pages that could have it mentioned (since they all take place in England). These pages are from King John, Richard II, Henry Fourth parts I and II, Henry V, Henry VIII, Henry VI part 1, and Merry Wives of Windsor. In these 199 pages St. Albans is only mentioned twice, on pages 67 and 81, neither time being any kind of historical reference. Only primary  significant signature page numbers of 33, 67, 100, and 111 exist within this set and only 67 (Francis) would provide the counterpart for his St Albans’ signature. The mentioning of St. Albans on page 81 is even of some minor interest because the line directly across from it has 33 letters. Possibly his name is encoded in some additional place on page if anyone cares to search further.

 

 

 

 

Fr_Verulam.jpg

Fr_St_Alban.jpg

 

THE HENRY IV PLAYS

The Henry IV plays are some of the most Baconian in the whole of the Shakespeare canon and are replete with references and allusions not only to their author Francis Bacon but to several members of the Bacon family and St Albans close to Gorhambury, the Bacon family estate.

Our supreme philosopher-poet and dramatist hilariously sends himself up in the character Francis, the drawer who serves drinks at the Boar’s Head and he also uses his own Christian name for the effeminate character Francis Feeble, one of the men enlisted to fight for King Henry IV.
 
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Bacon alludes to his father Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon in the form of Saint Nicholas in reference to a case presided over by the great Elizabethan Lord Keeper. In Act 2 Scene 1 two Carriers engage in some lively banter in a scene which contains allusions to his father Sir Nicholas Bacon. The First Carrier points the way by cueing the allusions to come with ‘be hanged, and come away’ (2:1:22) the first of half-a-dozen uses of ‘hang’ and ‘hangman’ as the scene unfolds. Gadshill says ‘Sirrah, if they meet not with Saint Nicholas’s clerks, I’ll give thee his neck’ (2:1:61-2). The Chamberlain replies ‘No, I’ll none of it: I pray thee keep that for the hangman, for I know thou worshippest Saint Nicholas as truly as a man of falsehood may’ (2:1:63-5). The passage alludes to a story later recalled by Bacon in his Apophthegms relating to a case presided over by Lord Keeper Nicholas Bacon which is also alluded to in The Merry Wives of Windsor.
 
Much of the action in the play takes place at the Boar’s Head Inn-a boar is a wild pig from which is derived bacon-a convenient device for suggesting the Bacon’s Head Inn. A figure of a boar appears on Bacon’s family crest.
 
The inspiration for the character of Mistress Quickly hostess of the Boar’s Head Inn came in the shape of Bacon’s aunt Lady Elizabeth Hoby Cooke Russell (younger sister of Bacon’s mother Lady Anne Cooke Bacon). One of Falstaff’s motley crew was named after her husband John, Lord Russell (namely Sir John Russell), the son and heir of Francis Russell, second Earl of Bedford, Bacon’s godfather and political patron.
 
The little-known brother of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon and Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell, William Cooke, had a son known as William Cooke of Highnam Court in Gloucestershire, whose name served for the cook William Cook at the Gloucester home of Robert Shallow, Justice of the Peace.
 
In I Henry IV there is repeated play or punning on the name BACON ‘I have a gammon of bacon and two races of ginger to be delivered as far as Charing Cross’/‘Ah, whoreson caterpillars, bacon-fed knaves! They hate us youth’/ ‘Hang ye, gorbellied knaves, are ye undone? No, ye fat chuffs; I would your store were here. On, bacons, on! What, ye knaves! Young men must live. You are grand-jurors, are ye? We’ll jure ye, faith.’
 
7b48b1_178cc01458964c45a0e44ba4f72cb117~
 
There are also several needless references to St Albans the near location of the Bacon family seat at Gorhambury. In I Henry IV Falstaff and Sir John Russell with their company march through the Midlands towards Shrewsbury. The scene is taken up with a long speech by Falstaff complaining that his bedraggled company have but a shirt and half between them containing a reference to St Albans ‘and the shirt, to say the truth, stolen from my host at Saint Albans, or the red-nose innkeeper of Daventry. But that’s all one; they’ll find linen enough on every hedge.’ What appears to be another seemingly superfluous reference to St Albans is found in 2 Henry IV ‘I warrant you, as common as the way between Saint Albans and London.’
 
Following the robbery scene Hal and Poins return to the Boar’s Head Inn (Bacon’s Head Inn). Hal is fraternising with the bar staff and he and Poins perplex the drawer Francis before the other robbers arrive. In his speech Prince Hal sets the scene ‘Sirrah, I am sworn brother to a leash of drawers, and can call them all by their christen names, as ‘Tom’, ‘Dick’, and ‘Francis’. It was Ben Jonson who famously said that Bacon could never pass by a jest and he humorously sends himself up in 1 Henry IV in which there are 33 instances of his name Francis in the specially formatted 1st column on page 56 in the Shakespeare First Folio: 33 being simple cipher for Bacon.
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17 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

This is something that I noticed as I was researching about the use of the letter "yogh" instead of a letter "B" in the First Folio.

I had no idea so had to research myself. Very interesting how our language was reduced to what could be printed. Reminds me of the idea of how reality was reduced to what could be spoken. 😉

https://ianchadwick.com/blog/bring-back-the-yogh-and-the-thorn/

 

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Thank you again A Phoenix for the historical context of the play! You probably have all these vignettes in one of your many papers. If so I hope it's easy to find them somewhere on this site or your academic blog :classic_smile:. Thanks also Light-of Truth and Allisnum2er for your usual insights! And especially thanks to RoyalCraftiness for the very deep comments. About the thought of some veiled cipher or allusion producing a bombardment of suggestive interpretations - that's one reason I prefer to limit the signature code numbers to what I call "Primary" ones so that this reduces the number of 'hits' found and so also reduces their probability of occurring by chance. Quite likely they could not be used by themselves to prove authorship. But as an adjunct to all the other non-cipher evidence they can be seen as more likely to be implanted by the author than as Baconian halucinations. Also, I can see that a highly learned genius like Bacon could have many of the thought levels and idea associations in mind that you allude to as he produced these plays. But also, as you say, the texts can produce more associations than even he could have intended. If modern Shakespeare scholars actually acted like scholars then they could each write long commentaries on the various possible allusions the author could be making. And then each reader would benefit from contemplating such possibilities. But alas, for now, it is only the likes of us that may be able to do so.  You've really stretched my mind at least on the possibilities!

----------------------------

Here is just a brief cipher candidate extracted from a more involved one. But you are all very familiar with the Love’s Labours’ Lost hornbook and seely sheep sceneSo I just want to focus on a part of it. Again, it has the question "What is the figure? What is the figure? " So I was interested in the emphasis on the Vowels and the strange ‘wit’ about them which isn’t clear. We note that the vowels ‘a e I’ were separated in the dialogue from the final two of ‘o u’. It turns out that ‘a e I’ sum to ‘15’ in the simple count and reduce further to a sum of ‘6’. Then the vowels ‘o u’ sum to ‘34’ and reduce to ‘7’, providing another possbie clever embedding of ‘67’, and also answering what the “figure” is. Further, with the letter ‘I’ capitalized, unlike the other vowels, it can suggest the phrase “I, Francis”. And with the letter count of the second line, which equals 33, we find “I, Francis Bacon”. I was surprised to find this but I also am sure that Bacon knew the letter counts like the back of his hand and so may have added this bit of dialogue for the enjoyment of future sleuths. Of course, that will likely be as far as it will every go. 

 

AEIOU_33.jpg

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5 hours ago, CAB said:

Here is just a brief cipher candidate extracted from a more involved one. But you are all very familiar with the Love’s Labours’ Lost hornbook and seely sheep sceneSo I just want to focus on a part of it. Again, it has the question "What is the figure? What is the figure? " So I was interested in the emphasis on the Vowels and the strange ‘wit’ about them which isn’t clear. We note that the vowels ‘a e I’ were separated in the dialogue from the final two of ‘o u’. It turns out that ‘a e I’ sum to ‘15’ in the simple count and reduce further to a sum of ‘6’. Then the vowels ‘o u’ sum to ‘34’ and reduce to ‘7’, providing another possbie clever embedding of ‘67’, and also answering what the “figure” is. Further, with the letter ‘I’ capitalized, unlike the other vowels, it can suggest the phrase “I, Francis”. And with the letter count of the second line, which equals 33, we find “I, Francis Bacon”. I was surprised to find this but I also am sure that Bacon knew the letter counts like the back of his hand and so may have added this bit of dialogue for the enjoyment of future sleuths. Of course, that will likely be as far as it will every go. 

 

AEIOU_33.jpg

Hi CAB,

I like this one too !😃

Here are some thoughts ...

B = two

image.png.beee9e8097f70ce8f79f31fa0aa27e34.png

I, Bacone

Bacone is one another valid spelling of Bacon

Here are the Dedications to Anthonie Bacone by Josuah Sylvester in "Du Bartas, His divine weekes"(1633)

https://books.google.fr/books?id=XN8rKQZfZwEC&pg=PP7&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q&f=false

image.png.2794170fe532639ce1b3f8bbecabc062.png

image.png.2b8525c648531730112e2d618e463ade.png

image.png.d58c05c3c0fee7eff505e61d83bd2dc2.png

And just for fun, you say ...

"So I was interested in the emphasis on the Vowels and the strange ‘wit’ about them which isn’t clear."

aei = 15

ou = 34

aeiou = 49

49 is the simple cipher of ... "WIT"

image.png.0f9e8a7f0a7819ee65f2a0a6f9e4e88c.png

Strange 'wit', indeed ! 😄

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FRANCIS BACON, LOVE'S LABOURS LOST AND THE BACON FAMILY

The early comedy Love’s Labour’s Lost is set in Navarre a kingdom between France and Spain at a time when Bacon was in France and when some of the historical events referred or alluded to in the play were happening and the kingdom where his brother Anthony Bacon, an intimate friend and correspondent of King Henry of Navarre, spent several years of his life. It was likely out of respect for a living king that Francis Bacon named the monarch in the play Ferdinand, King of Navarre and why the Princess of France (partly modelled upon Princess Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre and Queen of France with whom Bacon had a secret love affair) is not given a name in the play.

 
7b48b1_45f285afb2bb456f9938d2a73e15043c~
 

The lords attending the King of Navarre in the play Berowne, Longueville and Dumaine are named after historical persons-Duc de Biron and Duc de Longueville military leaders and loyal servants of Henry of Navarre, and Geraud de Lomagne, a Huguenot commander. Boyet the lord attending the Princess of France in the play is styled after another of Navarre’s lords, named Boyresse.

The passports of Anthony Bacon and his entourage providing them with official permission to travel through Navarre and parts of France are signed by Biron, Lomagne and Boyresse. The character Don Adriano de Armado in Love’s Labour’s Lost is based upon the notorious Antonio Perez, Spanish statesman and secretary of King Phillip II who left Spain in November 1591. He twice travelled to England as an envoy to King Henry IV of France and Navarre where he formed a close friendship with Francis and Anthony Bacon, remaining in England until July 1595. One of the Ladies-in-Waiting attending the Princess of France is named Katherine, Christian name of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon’s younger sister Katherine Cooke Killigrew. Two of the other characters in Love's Labour's Lost Anthony Dull and Sir Nathaniel are named by Bacon after his two brothers Anthony and Sir Nathaniel Bacon.

In the play Sir Nathaniel, Anthony Dull and Holofernes engage in a convoluted exchange on learning. Armado in an aside to Holofernes asks, 'are you not lettered?’ to which Mote interjects ‘Yes, yes, he teaches boys the horn-book. What is ‘a, b’ spelled backward, with the horn on his head?’ The Latin for ‘horn’ is ‘cornu’, thus A B spelled backwards with a horn on its head is BACORNU phonetically indicating BACON-YOU BACON.
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On 3/1/2024 at 8:19 AM, Allisnum2er said:

The letter yogh or ȝoȝ was used in the middle english and it hides the number 33.

33 = BACON

I shared one part of my research on the page 303 of the First Folio and its link with The myth of Icarus and "mediocria firma"(Francis Bacon's motto) at the end of my video "Filum Labyrinthi".

Few days ago, I told you that in my video "Filum Labyrinthi", I had shared only ONE PART of my research on page 303.

Today, we are March 3 or 3/03.

It is the perfect day to share with you the OTHER PART ! 😊

Here are 3 of the 8 medals from Jean Dassier's Series, The British Worthies (c.1730-1733).

Note that the portrait of Shakesepare on Dassier's medal is taken from the Chandos picture.

image.png.ff16c219ecb1b7911994e2536f507a81.png

For me, these medals hide the fact that Francis Bacon was Shakespeare.

HERE IS WHY !

image.png.01c4135ca281c87d3247c389461e1e78.png

Let's take a look at pages 156 and 259 of the First Folio.

image.png.ea88c444a4120130dd932521855b0559.png

The Goddess Aurora, engraved on the reverse of Bacon's Medal, is mentioned on page 156 of the First Folio.

And she is mentioned on line 53.

2024-02-25(5).png.32734bc8eeca1fd388aca2cfd4c926c2.png

We all know that Bacon, buccinator novi temporis (Trumpeter heralding a New Age), appears on both page 53 of COMEDIES and HISTORIES.

And here is what can be found on page 259 (Kay cipher of WILLIAM SHAKESPERE) that is the 277th page.

image.png.f2a5565c435c5a2f17d7287454e54098.png

To be continued ...

 

 

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image.png.1b93152eed6860e23bdfe5b341782446.png

image.png.d44185559cf54328a08ae935d272e86f.png

I think that this sentence from "Paradist Lost" was used instead of a sentence from Shakespeare's Work, so that we wonder about the phrase taken from Shakespeare which could replace it.

The answer ?

image.png.985daa2eb311f0af8d4c639d47db6aeb.png

The answer can be found on page 303 (Yogh) of the First Folio in the play the King Lear. 

And here is one last suggestion ...

image.png.85e25a9029d40d501f6ca01a89189a82.png

image.png.d55426e4461ac06c70021f9e710d1f36.png

 

 

HAPPY 3/03 !

😊

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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Few days ago, I told you that in my video "Filum Labyrinthi", I had shared only ONE PART of my research on page 303.

Today, we are March 3 or 3/03.

It is the perfect day to share with you the OTHER PART ! 😊

Here are 3 of the 8 medals from Jean Dassier's Series, The British Worthies (c.1730-1733).

Note that the portrait of Shakesepare on Dassier's medal is taken from the Chandos picture.

image.png.ff16c219ecb1b7911994e2536f507a81.png

For me, these medals hide the fact that Francis Bacon was Shakespeare.

HERE IS WHY !

image.png.01c4135ca281c87d3247c389461e1e78.png

Let's take a look at pages 156 and 259 of the First Folio.

image.png.ea88c444a4120130dd932521855b0559.png

The Goddess Aurora, engraved on the reverse of Bacon's Medal, is mentioned on page 156 of the First Folio.

And she is mentioned on line 53.

2024-02-25(5).png.32734bc8eeca1fd388aca2cfd4c926c2.png

We all know that Bacon, buccinator novi temporis (Trumpeter heralding a New Age), appears on both page 53 of COMEDIES and HISTORIES.

And here is what can be found on page 259 (Kay cipher of WILLIAM SHAKESPERE) that is the 277th page.

image.png.f2a5565c435c5a2f17d7287454e54098.png

To be continued ...

 

 

"Aurora" is Jakob Böhme's master work which caused the greatest stir in Europe among intellectuals like Bacon. It was described in its day as a work issued of pure revelation (ca. 1600, the year of the Stella Nova).  It's considered to be a major influence on German mysticism and of Rosicrucianism.  It is famous for it mystical delving into the natural links of God to the Sun and the stars. When you see 53 think Sun, as it is clearly shown to you descriptively in Sonnet 53. 

This is a portion of what is said abut the Sun:

"Now if we consider rightly of the sun and stars, with their corpus or body, operations and qualities, then the very divine being may be found therein, and we may find that the virtues of the stars are nature itself.

If the whole wheel, circumference or sphere of the stars be well considered, then it is soon found that the same is the mother of all things, or the nature out of which all things are come, and wherein all things stand and live, and whereby everything moveth; all things are made of these powers, and therein they all abide eternally."

 

Furthermore one can sense that there are in this work the roots of the stories which revolve around the lone tree in the forest. I am partial to the idea that it is what is informing the Bacon title "Sylva Sylavrum" with its obvious solar imagery and its linking of it to the "mundus intellectualis" of men.

 

From the preface there are these point that JB has made. (there are 86 listed).

 

33. But because they knew not the precious tree, which spread its branches over them all, all of them ran after and to the factors, and bought of them mixed false wares instead of good, and supposed they served for health: But because all of them longed after the good tree, (which, however, moved over them all), many of them were healed, because of  their great desire they had to the tree. For the fragrancy of the tree, which moved over them, healed them of their wrath or fierceness and wild nature, and not the false wares of the factors: this continued a long time.

40. For the prince of wrath or fierceness in nature gave his power to the tree, to spoil men that did eat of the wild fruits of the factors: Because they forsook the Tree of Life, and sought after their own cleverness, as mother Eve did in Paradise, therefore their own innate quality predominated in them, and brought them into strong delusions, as St Paul saith. [2 Thess. ii. 11] And the prince of wrath or fierceness raised wars and tempests from the wild tree towards the north, against the people and nations that were not born of the wild tree; and the tempest that came from the wild tree overthrew them in their weakness and faintness.

53. In the meanwhile they served the prince of darkness according to the impulse of the wild nature, and the precious tree stood there only for a May-game or mocking- stock, and many lived like wild beasts, and led a wicked life, in pride, pomp, stateliness and lasciviousness, and the rich consumed the labour and sweat of the poor, and oppressed him in addition.

 

By tying your to expose to the medals' creator you are exposing us to potentially only that person's beliefs which may be informed by the same counting game you are presenting. If it is correctly seen and interpreted in error who will be the wiser to it? I think you are discovering the logic of previous men and the suggestions that grabbed them. I don't think it is useful to show that men have believe that Bacon had written Shakespeare.  To show it is not to know it.

Rosicrucianism is so closely tied to JB that it would impossible to suggest that Bacon could be involved in that German phenomena and not know of him.

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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5 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

image.png.1b93152eed6860e23bdfe5b341782446.png

image.png.d44185559cf54328a08ae935d272e86f.png

I think that this sentence from "Paradist Lost" was used instead of a sentence from Shakespeare's Work, so that we wonder about the phrase taken from Shakespeare which could replace it.

The answer ?

image.png.985daa2eb311f0af8d4c639d47db6aeb.png

The answer can be found on page 303 (Yogh) of the First Folio in the play the King Lear. 

And here is one last suggestion ...

image.png.9b3a2ab2197274b545684e5769b60f46.png

image.png.f31d95a72b5a83e76813033d8431f203.png

HAPPY 3/03 !

😊

Awesome work, Yann. I am speechless!

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7 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

HAPPY 3/03 !

Happy 303!!

Crazy here, but I'm celebrating as best  I can.

Today is the birthday of Doc Watson, a bluegrass artist.

Fun lyrics:

"Born About Six Thousand Years Ago"

I was born about six thousand years ago
They ain't nothin' in this world that I don't know
I saw Old King Pharaoh's daughter find Little Moses on the water
And I can whip the man that says it isn't so

I saw Noah when he built that famous ark
I slipped into it one night when it got dark
I saw Jonah swallowed by the whale, and I pulled the lion's tail
I can whip the man that says it isn't so

I'm an educated man, to get more sense within my head I plan

Well, I've been on earth so long, and I used to sing a little song
While all of them old timers took their stand

Queen Elizabeth fell dead in love with me, (hee, hee, she did)
We was married in Milwaukee secretly
Then I took her out and shook her, and I went with General Hooker
To fight mosquitoes down in Tennessee

I taught Solomon his little A B C's (smart feller)
And through all his books, I tutored him with ease
Then I sailed out on the bay with Methuselah one day
And I played with his flowing whiskers in the breeze

I'm an educated man, to get more sense within my head I plan

Well, I've been on earth so long, and I used to sing a little song
While all of them old timers took their stand

I seen old Satan when he searched that Garden o'er, (old booger)
Saw Adam and Eve driven from the door
When the applese they were eating, from the bushes I was a-peeping
I can prove it from the man that ate the core

I saw Cain when he killed Abel with a spade
And I know the game was poker that they played
I was hid behind the shrub when he slapped him with that club
Poor old Abel caught him a-cheatin', and now he's dead

I'm an educated man, to get more sense within my head I plan

Well, I've been on earth so long, and I used to sing a little song
While all of them old timers took their stand
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5 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

...When you see 53 think Sun, as it is clearly shown to you descriptively in Sonnet 53...

Furthermore one can sense that there are in this work the roots of the stories which revolve around the lone tree in the forest. I am partial to the idea that it is what is informing the Bacon title "Sylva Sylavrum" with its obvious solar imagery and its linking of it to the "mundus intellectualis" of men.

Sonnet 53 and the "mundus intellectualis". Interesting connection! 🙂

That puts a fresh light on a Sonnet I have known for many years.

VVHat is your substance,whereof are you made,
That millions of strange shaddowes on you tend?

https://www.cabinet.ox.ac.uk/sylva-sylvarum-london-1627-1651

image.png.4f966916973af6df691206d652223919.png

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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Sonnet 53 and the "mundus intellectualis". Interesting connection! 🙂

That puts a fresh light on a Sonnet I have known for many years.

VVHat is your substance,whereof are you made,
That millions of strange shaddowes on you tend?

https://www.cabinet.ox.ac.uk/sylva-sylvarum-london-1627-1651

image.png.4f966916973af6df691206d652223919.png

Out of continued curiosity I've examined what we can extract from the construction of the image.

spacer.png

You' ll notice that there's a  period above the tetragrammaton which is of interest. I've joined it to the first occasion of a detail which touches the border of the image below. That would be the points that represent the plane of the top surfaces of the bases on which are placed the two columns (JB). When one asks Geogeba to spit out the angle made here with the period above it produces our forementioned 53 degrees. 

Without even checking anything else this means we know that there must exist a square here going through these points with corners that are on a circle. I've shown exactly that with the dotted lines for anyone who would question it.

This is a repeat of what is seen atop the Masonic compass and square where the angle of 53 degrees  is located. Here it is very clearly in the position of he Sun.

Of note the columns J and B could be used to suggest Jakob Bohme.

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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A Phoenix, Eric, many thanks for your touching feedbacks.❤️

Rob, I have just listened Doc Watson's song and I love it.

The 33 verses of this song (11 x 3) fit perfectly with this topic. 😉 

CJ, thank you for your feedback too.

Be sure that when I post the fruit of my research, I do it keeping in mind 3 possibilities :

1) This is nothing more than the fruit of my fertile imagination,

2) Those are secrets which were concealed by persons who believed Bacon was Shakespeare,

3) Those are secrets which were concealed by persons who knew Bacon was Shakespeare .

Back to the Medals, is Aurora a reference to the Work of Jakob Boehme ? I keep open to this possibility.

Is Aurora a reference to SHAKESPEARE/BACON ?

For sure, in my view.

Yesterday, I shared only the part of my research related with 3 of the 8 medals engraved by Jean Dassier.

Let's take a closer look at the Medal of NEWTON.

image.png.a87002ee18664dc663097f0ed68c25e2.pngNotice the "Starry" Curtains of Newton's Monument that look like the "starry" veil of Aurora and the Star on top.

 image.png.880cee386db3e319614d03051bf71432.png

For me, the Truth lies in the differences between Newton's monument engraved on the reverse of Dassier's medal and the original Newton's monument in Westminster Abbey.

The Curtains were added and are a reference to the second "Aurora" of the First Folio.

image.png.3d73bba40ea5449f772f6a61fc9e2ff5.png

And I let you appreciate the similarities between this passage and ... SONNET 33 ! 😉 

image.png.f87f9a184303d63c04d543bd93601511.png

I told you that NON PROCUL DIES = 156 (Simple cipher)

image.png.60534acc83f076f230fee9d594f4de0e.png

If we take in count the Prologue of Romeo and Juliet (that is missing in the First Folio),

"The shady curtains from Auroras bed" is on line ... 156 ! 🙂 

image.png.fe91cbcb5f8175bdc2ed0bc87b1fa63b.png

Now, notice that the Globe (mundus intellectualis ?) is much more detailed in this medal than the original one in Westminster Abbey, and that a star has been added.

Does it mark an emplacement ?

Talking about Sylva Sylvarum and the Sun/YHVH, I think that two of the 8 medals hide a reference to the title page of Sylva Sylvarum, the Medal of Newton that provides the Globe and the pillars drawn by the Curtains, and the Medal of Samuel Clarke that provide the Sun/YHVH.

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_G3-IP-320

QUO VERITAS VOCAT

(Where Truth calls)

image.png.e154f2fe06253e65f6b5e3bc422fe19e.png

image.png.86cacb9c34ff7de30abda636e320b95f.png

Kind regards.

 

 

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41 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Yann,

Awesome.

You are an absolute wonder!

Phoenix. 

Thank you again A Phoenix ! 🙏❤️

I forgot to mention the connection between Jean Dassier and George Vertue.

https://bathartandarchitecture.blogspot.com/2015/10/the-medallion-of-william-wake-by-jean.html

"Jean Dassier visited England in 1728 in the hope of gaining a position at the Royal Mint which was ultimately unsuccessful but cemented his relationship with English patrons ...

Vertue wrote in his notebook in April 1733 that the set of worthies was to be produced including medals of Chaucer Shakespeare, Milton, Camden, Bacon, Selden, Harvey, Boyle, Spenser, Locke, Clarke, Duke of Marlborough and Newton in the event only eight came to fruition. 

These medallions were produced at about the same time as those by Rysbrack and Scheemakers for the Temple of British Worthies Stowe House and those by Guelfi for Queen Caroline's Grotto.

Vertue says that the Dassier medallion of Shakespeare is based on his engraving. The medal of Milton perhaps, should be viewed as a pendant to that of Shakespeare, and is based on an authentic pastel taken from life, engraved by Vertue and ratified by Milton's daughter Deborah."

I wonder if Alexander Pope could have been involved.

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/708308

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WS_monument_by_Vertue.png

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7 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

A Phoenix, Eric, many thanks for your touching feedbacks.❤️

Rob, I have just listened Doc Watson's song and I love it.

The 33 verses of this song (11 x 3) fit perfectly with this topic. 😉 

CJ, thank you for your feedback too.

Be sure that when I post the fruit of my research, I do it keeping in mind 3 possibilities :

1) This is nothing more than the fruit of my fertile imagination,

2) Those are secrets which were concealed by persons who believed Bacon was Shakespeare,

3) Those are secrets which were concealed by persons who knew Bacon was Shakespeare .

Back to the Medals, is Aurora a reference to the Work of Jakob Boehme ? I keep open to this possibility.

Is Aurora a reference to SHAKESPEARE/BACON ?

For sure, in my view.

Yesterday, I shared only the part of my research related with 3 of the 8 medals engraved by Jean Dassier.

Let's take a closer look at the Medal of NEWTON.

image.png.a87002ee18664dc663097f0ed68c25e2.pngNotice the "Starry" Curtains of Newton's Monument that look like the "starry" veil of Aurora and the Star on top.

 image.png.880cee386db3e319614d03051bf71432.png

For me, the Truth lies in the differences between Newton's monument engraved on the reverse of Dassier's medal and the original Newton's monument in Westminster Abbey.

The Curtains were added and are a reference to the second "Aurora" of the First Folio.

image.png.3d73bba40ea5449f772f6a61fc9e2ff5.png

And I let you appreciate the similarities between this passage and ... SONNET 33 ! 😉 

image.png.f87f9a184303d63c04d543bd93601511.png

I told you that NON PROCUL DIES = 156 (Simple cipher)

image.png.60534acc83f076f230fee9d594f4de0e.png

If we take in count the Prologue of Romeo and Juliet (that is missing in the First Folio),

"The shady curtains from Auroras bed" is on line ... 156 ! 🙂 

image.png.fe91cbcb5f8175bdc2ed0bc87b1fa63b.png

Now, notice that the Globe (mundus intellectualis ?) is much more detailed in this medal than the original one in Westminster Abbey, and that a star has been added.

Does it mark an emplacement ?

Talking about Sylva Sylvarum and the Sun/YHVH, I think that two of the 8 medals hide a reference to the title page of Sylva Sylvarum, the Medal of Newton that provides the Globe and the pillars drawn by the Curtains, and the Medal of Samuel Clarke that provide the Sun/YHVH.

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/C_G3-IP-320

QUO VERITAS VOCAT

(Where Truth calls)

image.png.e154f2fe06253e65f6b5e3bc422fe19e.png

image.png.86cacb9c34ff7de30abda636e320b95f.png

Kind regards.

 

 

 

Here's what I want to add here to give some context to the time this was produced, as opposed to trying to tie it back to things previously written we do not know apply.

97jmgII.jpg

The image has been carefully designed. It presents us with obvious lines and points of interest.

The veil or the curtain is opened by 33 degrees. The same base points for an angle of 44 degrees to the star above the globe which is in prominence. 

The other two points of prominence in the curtain are the knots (B3, C3). They form an angle of 55 degrees with the mid point of the base of the triangle formed by the curtains. We immediately discover that the intention here is to present us with the Pythagorean 3:4:5 relationship.

The knots also relate to the star in prominence (A3) by an angle of 108 degrees which is the perimeter of the perfect Masonic square ashlar (4x27). 108, in esoteric parlance, is a cosmological proportion that is informing the size and distances of the astrological bodies.

Furthermore, the coffin here has straight sides which we can project to the bottom and discover that the angle there is 27 degrees, so again the side value of the ashlar and the representation of 3^3.

The globe here is showing two great circles (wider bands) which are crossing. The other lines on it are longitudes. The detail on the globe is not sufficient for me to position anything with it. The star you mention, if it is intended to represent something with its worldly projection can be imagined to be the Ground Point for a star (using it's declination and right ascension values in lieu of coordinates). It could that of the Stella Nova, but we cannot say. 

My takes:

1: Newton was a Freemason.

2: The medal is produced by someone who knows this.

3: the maker may also be a Freemason

It is well known that there existed, and still exist, a subset of Freemasonry where part of the imagined lineage of the origin stories (which the institution of Freemasonry does not back or support) goes through Bacon. We are left with the possibility that we could very well encounter suggestions of the sort. 

Bacon is absolutely an influence on the later Freemasons by virtue of what some believed about him.  The Royal Society was loaded with Masons who recognized Bacon as a father figure. Ashmole was actually much more than that. He was a self described "disciple" of Francis Bacon. So when we talk of a cult of Francis Bacon we have an idea of where we can turn to in order to see it at work. 

Sylva Sylvarum isn't Bacon's creation. It's Rawley's. I'd love to say that Bacon was reaching for Jakob Bohme's evolving Christian ideas, but it may in fact be Rawley we are detecting. There is a very real possibility that Rawley is taking liberties, because the SS title page is an attempt to alter the similar image which we know from the Advancement of Learning. In that one there isn't the overt Christian mysticism of SS. There appears to more in that one that is about what I would call empiric relationships between shapes. 

Rawley's name on that page mentions that he is a member of the Great Council. The Great Council protected the religious interests of England. They were the sentinels. Rawley and Bacon were very close friends.  I do not know to what degree Rawley is putting words in Bacon's mouth, so to speak. All I know is that Bacon's swan song's title page is curiously of a flavor that I would call Christian with a hint of old Gnostic Christian ideas. 

 

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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15 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Today is the birthday of Doc Watson, a bluegrass artist.

Fun lyrics:

"Born About Six Thousand Years Ago"

Light-of-Truth, you got me wondering if Doc Watson was the original composer of that song. I found this at Elijah Wald's blog: "Music History: A Songobiography." He says a version written by Harry C. Clyde and H. C. Verner was first published in 1894, but in Doc's version, about half the verses are different. Also this interesting bit of trivia: "Incidentally, the line about “Peter, Paul, and Moses playing ring-around-the-roses” is what inspired Peter, Paul, and Mary to call themselves that, requiring Noel Stookey to change his name."  https://www.elijahwald.com/songblog/born-10000-years-ago/

Edited by Christie Waldman
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