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Baconian Ciphers - Misc.


CAB

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Recently I was following work by a couple scholars who are looking to prove that the universe shows evidence of having been created by Intelligent Design. Two scholars, William Dembski and Winston Ewert held a webinar to discuss their new book on the subject. What they discussed made me think of Baconian ciphers. They said they had earlier received criticism because it appeared that they were mainly looking for seeming designs in Nature and then creating a theory or hypothesis of Intelligent design to explain what they found. So they realized they needed to strengthen their argument by first developing their theory which should then predict unsought for designs in nature and if they found these then this would strengthen their theory. They did this and were showing some of the results. 

Well, I'm confident that Baconians had done this pretty well for about a century or more now. Early researchers did know that Bacon was a cipher expert and they had come across, maybe by chance at first, some seeming ciphers in his works or in works connected to him in some way. So, for example, looking for and finding the simple cipher counts for his name in many places, beyond what they had first discovered by chance. But I knew that in addition to many of these theorectically predicted discoveries, there were many potential ciphers that had the additional characteristic of not just seeming to be by significant numbers associated with Bacon's name, but were also standing out from the surrounding text which in some way often seemed to strongly hint of their presence. 

I'm sure many of us have found or seen cipher candidates of this type. I'd like to post some that I collected when I focused on them for about a decade when I was also collecting some that I thought were among the best and together could perhaps be convincing enough to prove 'beyond resonable doubt'. I tried to look through those posted on this site already to see if many or any have already been discussed. My search hasn't been thorough so I may be posting some that many of you have already seen. Any I may present some by other Baconians that seemed especially good just because they should probably get all the attention we can give them.  

For now I will just show a Play listing where I show the many plays that I have found some cipher candidates. I imagine some of you have likely found some in the same plays or in the ones that I didn't. The numbers next to the play titles relate to particular ciphers candidates  that I discuss elsewhere.

 

Play_List.jpg

Edited by CAB
To explain image numbers next to Plays. Also, fixed two typos.
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I will now post an example of what I mentioned in the first post. But first I want to say that if I were to present evidence in a court of law arguing that Bacon was the primary author of the Shakespeare works, that I would not likely use any cipher evidence at first. Even if many of us agreed that we thought the cipher evidence was sufficient to prove the case, there's plenty of non-cipher evidence which seems superior and far easier for a jury to comprehend. My guess is that Bacon was doubtful that hardly any evidence regarding his role in the works, outside of the First Folio and the Sonnets, would survive for public perusal. And therefore perhaps the only evidence he could really count on surviving was in the FF and Sonnets themselves. But now we've seen important parts of Holinshed's Chronicles, we have his Promus, and the Northumberland manuscript and much else. So at least he left his tracks throughout the Shak works. Unless perhaps the Masons or some group is waiting for the right time to release some more evidence.

Okay, so here's a portion of AWTEW that caught my eye. You are welcome to email me if you think i'm halucinating. But I also suspect that only those very familiear with a variety of Baconian ciphers may see the pattern.

The example comes from the play All’s Well That Ends Well.  This play’s name was found in Bacon’s Promus notebook.

It’s a scene where one character is asking the name of another. Of course this is common. The name of S. Francis (congruent with Sir Francis [Bacon]) is used 13 lines prior to the dialogue of interest. The name of Francis is used in four of the plays, and variations are also found, so it’s not really unusual that it’s used here. This is on page 243 of the Comedies in the first column. Here is the passage:

   Wid. Heere you shall see a Countriman of yours

That has done worthy service.

   Hel. His name I pray you?

   Dia.  The Count Rossillion : know you such a one?        

   Hel. But by the eare that heares most nobly of him :

His face I know not.

[You can refer to the screen shot below.]

The early Baconian cipher researchers would sometimes point to such instances of the word ‘name’ or of the word ‘Count’ as times they should pay particular attention to the possibility of a hidden signature count or some other authorship clue. Usually the dialogue suggests an allusion beyond the play’s plot to someone clued in to ‘hear’ it.  In this case the line with “Count Rossillion” in it has a dialogue count of exactly 33 letters. Then “Count Rossillion” in the Kay alphabet equals 281, and would become 282 “Francis Bacon” in Kay, if the word “one” at the end of the line was meant to be included. The casual use of named numbers in a text is a common way to provide a clue or to contribute to one. The line isn’t the only one in the column with 33 letters so what makes it significant is it being associated with a question of identity and the word ‘count’. Still, by itself, it’s not very much evidence but it turns out that there are a number of similar examples of asking for a name or some revelation of identity which are found to be connected to one of our significant Bacon name numbers. Several of these instances have the name Francis, or a version of the name, close by in the text, possibly to prime the reader’s mind. I do not claim that this is a clear case of an intended cipher. But after seeing a lot of such 'coincidences' my suspicions kept growing.

Here is the screen shot and also the cipher chart that more readers will be familiar with.

 

 

 

Count_Rosillion.jpg

Simple-Kay_Counts_Chart.jpg

Edited by CAB
Fix typos and made a word change.
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Hi CAB,
There are some very interesting Baconian elements to this play - here's a few. . .
 
7b48b1_83cea22109564c79b83cb9c35afb1d91~
Its important character Countess Roussillon is based upon the real-life person of the Countess Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell (Bacon's aunt) and refracts the relationship with her son Sir Thomas Posthumous Hoby (Bacon's cousin). The textual evidence alongside the known biographical details of the Dowager Countess Lady Elizabeth Russell compellingly demonstrates she and the Dowager Countess of Roussillon are one and the same.
 
The play alludes to the philosopher’s stone, the legendary alchemical substance, also known as the elixir of life, for prolonging of life, or the achieving of immortality long associated with Bacon’s secret Rosicrucian Brotherhood. Regarding immortality, he also wrote a treatise entitled The History of Life and Death first published in Latin the same year as the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio where All’s Well That Ends Well was first printed. The scene in All’s Well That Ends Well involving the illness and cure derived from two of Bacon’s unpublished Latin writings entitled Temporis Partus Masculus (c.1603) and Cogitata et Visa (c.1607), neither of which were translated or published until long after his recorded death.

awtew.jpg

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Thank you for sharing CAB,

Here are some thoughts regarding the passage you mention ...

image.png.d9f225d48c79fe33ab69657c50e4fff8.png

I f we take the two "Count" in count 😊 ...

They provide us with two letters C : CC # 33 = BACON

"Countriman" is the 6th word

"Count" is the 20th word

20 + 6 = 26 # B.F.

Moreover,

"eare" is the 30th word and "heares" is the 32nd word

30 + 32 = 62 # F.B.

The 26th word ot this passage is "one"

Is there a link between "one" and "twenty-six" ?

Indeed! In hebrew the letter A(1) is Aleph (ALP = 1 + 30 + 80 = 111)

It is said that the letter aleph א is made of one letter vav(6) and two letter yod(10)

Thus Aleph = 1 but also 26 and 111(ALP)

 And here is another possibility ...

image.png.2827e9c2bc6fccff5c533227b3b877e4.png

His name I pray you ?

baCon

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1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

Thank you for sharing CAB,

Here are some thoughts regarding the passage you mention ...

image.png.d9f225d48c79fe33ab69657c50e4fff8.png

I f we take the two "Count" in count 😊 ...

They provide us with two letters C : CC # 33 = BACON

 

Curious page with "hang" in the first line which to me is many times a clue that Bacon is to be found. Look at the total word count up to and including "name":

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/AWW_F1/page/14/index.html

image.png.ecc02e0ee7b5b6d90e84111f68f1e2af.png

His name I pray you?

The Count, 287, know you such a one?

But by the eare that heares most nobly of him.

 

From the first Count (not counting Countriman) to the third Count we have 100 words which is the Simple cipher for FRANCIS BACON:

image.png.152ffd66565bada22050d9b04a451faf.png

 

From the first Count (not counting Countriman) to the fourth and final Count in that column we have 174 words, which is the Simple cipher for FRANCIS BACON TUDOR.

image.png.9ad416dfa2327be30af33fe6a0101f97.png

We have "hang" in the very first line as a visual hint and we have "His name I pray you?" and both CAB and Allisnum2er have demonstrated "BACON" is represented. Then between the first occurrence of "Count" and the third we have 100 (FRANCIS BACON) words and between the second and third "Count" the line, "What's his name" is contained. Immediately below the third occurrence of "Count" we see the words "her name" contained in between the first "Count" and fourth and final "Count" which is 174 (FRANCIS BACON TUDOR).

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/261/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.0303f9a923d30e5697f83a39fbe5aed2.png

 

Of the great Count (100) himselfe, she is too meane

To haue her name repeated (174)

 

Yea, I know, a lot of coincidences and just because hang, name, and Count are obvious that does not mean we should Count to find Bacon's name hanging. Right? LOL

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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I'm supposed to be working today. Oooops.

See this, and Yann I need your help finding TUDOR. 😉

CbaconC.gif.271d5c47027c96ad17b6aff60a766810.gif

Another thing that makes me curious is this:

image.png.83af957d1970997533d79b707a2cebe3.png

Now I might have to go back and read all the stuff that has been said on the B'Hive regarding Bacon's poem about the Life of Man being a Bubble. 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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15 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Rob, here are some ideas ...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/261/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.2e4947bdca35112d7bacfa3344122fea.png

243 = 100 (FRANCIS BACON) + 143 (QUEEN ELIZABETH)

The maiden Diana

https://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/996344

 

Perfect! 🙂

Did you notice the “What’s his name?” then across the page “Lord Bacon” that I missed on my giant PC but saw on my tiny phone just now eating lunch and having a beer? Lol

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10 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Perfect! 🙂

Did you notice the “What’s his name?” then across the page “Lord Bacon” that I missed on my giant PC but saw on my tiny phone just now eating lunch and having a beer? Lol

Yes, Indeed ! I noticed the possibility of  "Lord f bacOn" with the "f" of "farre" and the "c" of respect.

Edit:

But I just noticed the C of Cap 😅

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

To be honest, I really do not remember !😅

If it was it was in one of your videos as no text search is producing anything.

"243 = 100 (FRANCIS BACON) + 143 (QUEEN ELIZABETH) " sure seems very familiar to me...

Yann, please never ever delete your transcripts, slides, or whatever you have in notes!! PLEASE! 🙂

 

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11 minutes ago, peethagoras said:

All's Well That Ends Well

sum of the initial capitals is 67.

 

It looks like "All's Well That Ends Well" is the 12th play in the First Folio. What follows is "Twelfth Night."

These are weird things that make my brain sizzle. LOL

 

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My gosh, and here I was concerned I might be stretching your imaginations a bit too much! So now I doubt that's even possible as yours are already stretched much beyond mine! Thank you all for your knowledge, insights, and sharing! And though I said we may not be able to use hardly any of these cipher discoveries in a court case if we ever had that chance, still there are good reasons for this avenue of research. 1. Since we know that Bacon was a cipher expert and learned to use them while still a youth, and since many writers of the time used them, and with all the non-cipher evidence of his authorship, it would have thrown up a very big red flag if no or few hidden cipher candidates were found in the Shak works.  2. Bacon wanted the world, especially that of the sciences but also with everyday people, to use the inductive aspect of reasoning, and searching for cipher patterns in the works can help with that.  3. The more we find the better we can understand his own thinking and how stretched his mind really was.  4. And if we ever had a chance to compare some of our cipher evidence with that of the Oxfordians, I'm sure the Baconians were come out very favorable and it may even be enough to end the debate over the best alternate authorship candidate.

Now a couple of you, Light-of-Truth and Allisnum2er, mentioned the 'Lord Bacon' cipher so I will show that next. I've liked it very much too! 

This is in the play of Anthony and Cleopatra, Act 3, Scene 13, pg 357.  Again, we have an asking of a name:

 

Cleo. What’s your name?

 The line following that of Cleopatra’s also does not seem to have the potential as a hidden signature:

 “Thid.  My name is Thidias.”

 

But directly across from “What’s your name?” in the next column is “And plighter of high hearts. O that I were” which has a letter count of 33. Again, the meaning of the sentence is not the pertinent factor when we’re looking for numerical signatures. Just in front of this line, and in the previous column where we find “What’s your name” is the second syllable of “Land-lord”, so just “lord”, one of Bacon’s most common titles and how others often referred to him. Together they can be read as “lord 33” and so “Lord Bacon”. Whether this might be a planned cipher or just a suggestive coincidence we cannot know for sure. But it’s associated with an identity question as well as a significant letter count and title for Bacon. Here's the screen shot:

 

 

Lord_33-Bacon.jpg

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I suppose you all may also know of this next one. 

In Anthony and Cleopatra (page 365) there is a another suggestive finding, when we have:

 

Cleo. What’s thy name?

Pro. My name is Proculeius.

Cleo.  Anthony

 

Here, neither the name “Proculeius” nor the letter count of this line or the line directly across equals a significant number. However, the following line with Cleopatra speaking “Anthony”, which is the only word on that line, is across from the line in the next column which is

 

“It shall content me best: Be gentle to her”.

 

This line does have a count of 33, again the simple count for “Bacon”. And being opposite the name of Anthony we have the name of Francis’ brother “Anthony Bacon”. This Anthony, who likewise had superb language skills, has received some speculation as being a collaborator with Francis in writing plays.  Elsewhere Anthony seems to be likened to the mythical Phoenix in “Thou Arabian bird!”, and in this same play, this would make another unlikely coincidence, if that’s what it is. Now in this case the line count of 33 is found in the adjacent column directly across from the name Anthony. We know now that this is not so strange since we are seeing it multiple times.

 

Anthony_33.jpg

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7 hours ago, CAB said:

My gosh, and here I was concerned I might be stretching your imaginations a bit too much! So now I doubt that's even possible as yours are already stretched much beyond mine! Thank you all for your knowledge, insights, and sharing! And though I said we may not be able to use hardly any of these cipher discoveries in a court case if we ever had that chance, still there are good reasons for this avenue of research. 1. Since we know that Bacon was a cipher expert and learned to use them while still a youth, and since many writers of the time used them, and with all the non-cipher evidence of his authorship, it would have thrown up a very big red flag if no or few hidden cipher candidates were found in the Shak works.  2. Bacon wanted the world, especially that of the sciences but also with everyday people, to use the inductive aspect of reasoning, and searching for cipher patterns in the works can help with that.  3. The more we find the better we can understand his own thinking and how stretched his mind really was.  4. And if we ever had a chance to compare some of our cipher evidence with that of the Oxfordians, I'm sure the Baconians were come out very favorable and it may even be enough to end the debate over the best alternate authorship candidate.

Now a couple of you, Light-of-Truth and Allisnum2er, mentioned the 'Lord Bacon' cipher so I will show that next. I've liked it very much too! 

This is in the play of Anthony and Cleopatra, Act 3, Scene 13, pg 357.  Again, we have an asking of a name:

 

Cleo. What’s your name?

 The line following that of Cleopatra’s also does not seem to have the potential as a hidden signature:

 “Thid.  My name is Thidias.”

 

But directly across from “What’s your name?” in the next column is “And plighter of high hearts. O that I were” which has a letter count of 33. Again, the meaning of the sentence is not the pertinent factor when we’re looking for numerical signatures. Just in front of this line, and in the previous column where we find “What’s your name” is the second syllable of “Land-lord”, so just “lord”, one of Bacon’s most common titles and how others often referred to him. Together they can be read as “lord 33” and so “Lord Bacon”. Whether this might be a planned cipher or just a suggestive coincidence we cannot know for sure. But it’s associated with an identity question as well as a significant letter count and title for Bacon. Here's the screen shot:

 

 

Lord_33-Bacon.jpg

Thank you again CAB !

I love this one too. 😊

image.png.9f6a35e5e45033f55e57a4ceadf4dcd2.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/865/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

Notice that by counting from "To let a Fellow ..." , "were" is the 33rd word.

Thus "And plighter of high hearts. O that I were" has 33 letters and ends on the 33rd word.

Rob, yesterday you asked me to find TUDOR bu t I did not find one that satisfied me.

But today, I found an interesting one thanks to "Kingly Seale" 😉 

image.png.d56fc0c07ca11cc1fa448d241a720af8.png

W. TUDOR

And here is another possible reference to Anthony Bacon a few lines earlier ...

image.png.98db745bbffbce15d740d8a8dcdb2a65.png

I am Anthony BAcon

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7 hours ago, CAB said:

I suppose you all may also know of this next one. 

In Anthony and Cleopatra (page 365) there is a another suggestive finding, when we have:

 

Cleo. What’s thy name?

Pro. My name is Proculeius.

Cleo.  Anthony

 

Here, neither the name “Proculeius” nor the letter count of this line or the line directly across equals a significant number. However, the following line with Cleopatra speaking “Anthony”, which is the only word on that line, is across from the line in the next column which is

 

“It shall content me best: Be gentle to her”.

 

This line does have a count of 33, again the simple count for “Bacon”. And being opposite the name of Anthony we have the name of Francis’ brother “Anthony Bacon”. This Anthony, who likewise had superb language skills, has received some speculation as being a collaborator with Francis in writing plays.  Elsewhere Anthony seems to be likened to the mythical Phoenix in “Thou Arabian bird!”, and in this same play, this would make another unlikely coincidence, if that’s what it is. Now in this case the line count of 33 is found in the adjacent column directly across from the name Anthony. We know now that this is not so strange since we are seeing it multiple times.

 

Anthony_33.jpg

Great find CAB !

I also C BACON 😊

image.png.920ec78a4a1be960fb8da5b9db6bab10.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/873/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

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I think that there are far more things hidden on this page 365.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/873/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

image.png.3188ab2a9645404ac8956e5a0c795cdd.png

"Looke him i'th'Face" is line 33 (33 = BACON).

Interestingly, if there was not this contraction of "in the Face" then Face would be the 33rd word by counting from "Pray you ... ".

Right below "Looke" we have a hanged HOG in acrostic.

And as you know HANG-HOG is latten for BACON.

But can we find the word "hang" ?

Indeed !

On line 67 🙂 (67 = FRANCIS)

image.png.baa19173ae3ad54288b17cbabf5f48bb.png

One last idea ...

"Royal Queene" is on line 39 (C.I.) that is the simple cipher of F. BACON

 

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Very very interesting again. Okay, here is a short but sweet one that wouldn't surprise me if you all already are familiar with it. So just to make sure, since I didn't see it in my first perusal, here it is:

11)  A line count of 33 is also found in the Prologue of The Life of Henry the Fift. It’s worth a mention because the line has the word “Cyphers” in it as well as the word “Figure’ nearby. It can suggest that we can be “Cyphers” in the sense of having numerical names. It seems to say that the writer, at least, is a ‘cypher’ and he’s associated this claim with the number 33.

The word “Accompt”, though outwardly meaning a “narrative” accords with “Figure” and “Cyphers” in its other usage as a term related to “reckoning” or “counting”.

 

 

Ciphers_Accompt.jpg

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Here's one that with the usual cues shown earlier but with a different signature number.

15)  Being alerted to possible clues in the text to a hidden signature earlier researchers knew that a number or the word ‘name’ or ‘count’ can indicate that one of Bacon’s significant numbers is very close by. In the ‘Rossilion’ candidate we have the words ‘name’ and ‘count’ together along with the number ‘one’.

 

Now in the play Twelfth Night, soon after Act 1, Scene 4 begins, on page 257 of the Comedies, in the first column, we have this exchange:

 

    Enter Duke, Curio, and Attendants

VioI thanke you: heere comes the Count.

DukeWho saw Cesario, hoa?

 

Now, the word “count”, or “Count” as the title of a character is used often in the plays. There’s no suggestion that each one would be a signal of some cipher or code. It’s just that sometimes the text is such that it seems to hint at this and so stands out from other instances. Here, the line count reveals nothing, but the name Cesario, being emphasized with “Who saw….” appeared to be the best place to test. The Simple count for “Cesario” is 67, the same count as for “Francis” in the Simple alphabet. This finding wasn’t identified by earlier Baconians, nor was the Count Rossillion example but searching through the options with the key word ‘count’ led to them as promising candidates. To judge whether or not they are unlikely to be by coincidence we need to look at more examples.

 

Cesario.jpg

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Every 1 is searching for Cyphars:

a.png.5b5a440a93d6956e28c10785598a3d0d.png

In case this was missed: 

First note: Much Ado III.i.61 [Hero to Ursula, of Beatrice] I never yet saw man ... / But she would spell him backward

      563 - 365 = 198 = 6 times 33 or   F (times) Bacon.

and possibly: see CLEOPATRA, 3rd, 6th and 5th are E P and A which make the sum of 21, as in W for Will.

APE: William Shakespeare?

 

All of this only goes to strengthen a theory I've held for many years: Just like the New Testament (imo) , the Shakespeare name and Cannon are in effect a compilation of many spells. The text being a kind of pharoh's sarcophagus, the enclosed body being the RC wisdom and knowledge etc. This is the reason why names and words are broken up and scattered in many various locations.

Edited by peethagoras
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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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19 hours ago, CAB said:

Very very interesting again. Okay, here is a short but sweet one that wouldn't surprise me if you all already are familiar with it. So just to make sure, since I didn't see it in my first perusal, here it is:

11)  A line count of 33 is also found in the Prologue of The Life of Henry the Fift. It’s worth a mention because the line has the word “Cyphers” in it as well as the word “Figure’ nearby. It can suggest that we can be “Cyphers” in the sense of having numerical names. It seems to say that the writer, at least, is a ‘cypher’ and he’s associated this claim with the number 33.

The word “Accompt”, though outwardly meaning a “narrative” accords with “Figure” and “Cyphers” in its other usage as a term related to “reckoning” or “counting”.

 

 

Ciphers_Accompt.jpg

Hi CAB,

Thank you. Personally, I was not familiar with this one.

image.png.fdb5c51f444587376a1088324af4a024.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/423/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

Here is something interesting.

If the last line has 33 letters, the previous line has 27 letters (3^3).

And these two lines are lines 16 and 17.

16 + 17 = 33

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19 hours ago, CAB said:

Here's one that with the usual cues shown earlier but with a different signature number.

15)  Being alerted to possible clues in the text to a hidden signature earlier researchers knew that a number or the word ‘name’ or ‘count’ can indicate that one of Bacon’s significant numbers is very close by. In the ‘Rossilion’ candidate we have the words ‘name’ and ‘count’ together along with the number ‘one’.

 

Now in the play Twelfth Night, soon after Act 1, Scene 4 begins, on page 257 of the Comedies, in the first column, we have this exchange:

 

    Enter Duke, Curio, and Attendants

Vio. I thanke you: heere comes the Count.

Duke. Who saw Cesario, hoa?

 

Now, the word “count”, or “Count” as the title of a character is used often in the plays. There’s no suggestion that each one would be a signal of some cipher or code. It’s just that sometimes the text is such that it seems to hint at this and so stands out from other instances. Here, the line count reveals nothing, but the name Cesario, being emphasized with “Who saw….” appeared to be the best place to test. The Simple count for “Cesario” is 67, the same count as for “Francis” in the Simple alphabet. This finding wasn’t identified by earlier Baconians, nor was the Count Rossillion example but searching through the options with the key word ‘count’ led to them as promising candidates. To judge whether or not they are unlikely to be by coincidence we need to look at more examples.

 

Cesario.jpg

Using the great tool of Rob (Light-of-Truth) it seems that CESARIO share more than just the same simple cipher with "FRANCIS" 🙂

image.png.757148db11aea2faf14dc24b7cb13f74.png

image.png.147f73611ce345ea3c70fd9fe0300271.png

In this case, it is easily understandable as the E  and the O of cEsariO  transform themselves into the F and the N of FraNcis.

 

EDIT :

Did you notice the reference to Sir Toby on the same "line" ?

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/275/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

image.png.7e45094119c003e5de5eda6a24b905e6.png

Another hidden reference to Toby/Tobie Matthews, Bacon's best friend and alter ego ?

image.png.bbe1e3358e844c5df1118c5fcc8b9750.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/20/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

(Sorry for the lack of references but I do not know who noticed these acrostics in the first instance.)

 

 

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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4 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

(Sorry for the lack of references but I do not know who noticed these acrostics in the first instance.)

Mather Walker? Maybe. 😉

It's in a popula YouTube video too, but not sure who came up with it first.

Here is a classic SirBacon.org article, "tobiematthew".

Funny when I first started doing cipher counts in my head, CESARIO was one of the very first Shakespeare names I added up. Now I want to try to remember what else I was finding when I did that. LOL

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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