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JULIE KEMP'S RESEARCH


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Progress indeed! It’s looking great – really clear and easy to see which is so important with family trees.

Love the background – very regal – is there maybe a purple version? You can get some Tudor rose backgrounds, but I think it’s probably best it’s not too busy, that’s why this one works well. Perhaps the bars in white or cream. But these are just minor design things which sometimes when you play around with them they look better but not always. Love how you’ve incorporated the Bacons – very special they take their rightful place. Only minor and just a personal preference – I love the Isaac Oliver painting of Lady Anne and the Nicholas one from the NPG but they may not work as well. Maybe you could do a silhouette of Eleanor West as presumably she is elusive (as you would have surely found her Eric!😀). Perfect font as well.

Great work – it’s brilliant seeing it all take shape and come together!

THANK YOU❤️❤️

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10 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Progress indeed! It’s looking great – really clear and easy to see which is so important with family trees.

Love the background – very regal – is there maybe a purple version? You can get some Tudor rose backgrounds, but I think it’s probably best it’s not too busy, that’s why this one works well. Perhaps the bars in white or cream. But these are just minor design things which sometimes when you play around with them they look better but not always. Love how you’ve incorporated the Bacons – very special they take their rightful place. Only minor and just a personal preference – I love the Isaac Oliver painting of Lady Anne and the Nicholas one from the NPG but they may not work as well. Maybe you could do a silhouette of Eleanor West as presumably she is elusive (as you would have surely found her Eric!😀). Perfect font as well.

Great work – it’s brilliant seeing it all take shape and come together!

THANK YOU❤️❤️

 

 

Hi A Phoenix

Your reaction bodes well. It's not even at mock-up stage yet, only a schematic in flux. Last week Julie sent me a list of 26 names she wanted me to remove. I'm glad you think it 'reads' better now that it's been streamlined to show only the two brothers' direct descent from Henry VII. The three members of his foster family are parked to one side for now. I put it to Julie in an email tonight that perhaps there should be two genealogies. The ancestral tree we are re-constructing was known only to Leicester and Elizabeth, Anne, Nicholas and Anthony Bacon, and his immediate circle of 'knights of the helmet'. The other tree is known to everyone, fully approved by academics. One does not invalidate the other. Seen together, both lineages (royal and common) help us to understand the existential 'trap' that "Francis Bacon" found himself in around the age of 16.

Initially, I chose the two Gorhambury terracotta busts of Nicholas and Anne Bacon because I think the artist (Italian?) has depicted them at their best. The late portraits of Nicholas Bacon are a bit intimidating. The miniature portrait of Anne Bacon by Isaac Oliver strikes me as strange - it looks nothing like the only other picture of her that we have.

ScreenShot2024-02-27at11_13_04pm.png.590e7a28f6f685ef9fa6c1c4bdee7184.png

 

A few days ago I wrote to Viscountess Grimston to ask if the original portrait (above, right) was part of the Gorhambury collection. I was also interested if the same was true of the only known image of Alice Barnham (Mrs F Bacon). Not only did Rosie confirm that both pictures are at Gorhambury, she very kindly sent me snapshots of each painting in situ. Until I have her approval, I can't post them here or anywhere, but suffice to say that I was excited to finally see these two pictures in colour for the first time.

The Anne Bacon portrait is outstanding for its psychological insight - severe yet serene. The Alice Barnham/Bacon/Underhill portrait is also a revelation. It must have been painted long after FB disappeared in 1626 when Alice was 34. Here she looks to be in her late-forties? Neither of these important pictures are in the Bridgeman Art Library's Gorhambury Collection, unfortunately. They certainly should be.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

Hi A Phoenix

Your reaction bodes well. It's not even at mock-up stage yet, only a schematic in flux. Last week Julie sent me a list of 26 names she wanted me to remove. I'm glad you think it 'reads' better now that it's been streamlined to show only the two brothers' direct descent from Henry VII. The three members of his foster family are parked to one side for now. I put it to Julie in an email tonight that perhaps there should be two genealogies. The ancestral tree we are re-constructing was known only to Leicester and Elizabeth, Anne, Nicholas and Anthony Bacon, and his immediate circle of 'knights of the helmet'. The other tree is known to everyone, fully approved by academics. One does not invalidate the other. Seen together, both lineages (royal and common) help us to understand the existential 'trap' that "Francis Bacon" found himself in around the age of 16.

Initially, I chose the two Gorhambury terracotta busts of Nicholas and Anne Bacon because I think the artist (Italian?) has depicted them at their best. The late portraits of Nicholas Bacon are a bit intimidating. The miniature portrait of Anne Bacon by Isaac Oliver strikes me as strange - it looks nothing like the only other picture of her that we have.

ScreenShot2024-02-27at11_13_04pm.png.590e7a28f6f685ef9fa6c1c4bdee7184.png

 

A few days ago I wrote to Viscountess Grimston to ask if the original portrait (above, right) was part of the Gorhambury collection. I was also interested if the same was true of the only known image of Alice Barnham (Mrs F Bacon). Not only did Rosie confirm that both pictures are at Gorhambury, she very kindly sent me snapshots of each painting in situ. Until I have her approval, I can't post them here or anywhere, but suffice to say that I was excited to finally see these two pictures in colour for the first time.

The Anne Bacon portrait is outstanding for its psychological insight - severe yet serene. The Alice Barnham/Bacon/Underhill portrait is also a revelation. It must have been painted long after FB disappeared in 1626 when Alice was 34. Here she looks to be in her late-forties? Neither of these important pictures are in the Bridgeman Art Library's Gorhambury Collection, unfortunately. They certainly should be.

 

 

Hi Eric,

I think your two trees idea is brilliant - double the work but brilliant nevertheless. A Bacon tree would also enable people to see the Cooke, Cecil and Russell links. (very important and well connected families) It's amazing how many people don't realise that the great Lord Burghley was FB's uncle and that Robert Cecil was his cousin. A distinct and different coloured background for his 'common' tree as well - what a great duo!

Very excited by the portraits. I agree, the Oliver portrait doesn't really look like the Gorhambury one, although I was struck by the pale blue eyes (apparently Sir Nicholas had blue eyes as well which would make FB having hazel/brown ones unlikely if he were their son) Would love to see the portraits in colour, let's hope Rosie gives her approval, they should certainly be seen by the public. Do you know if they are on public display at Gorhambury?

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2 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

Thanks A Phoenix for suggesting the purple background. 

ScreenShot2024-02-27at11_55_06pm.png.c95139a3d7104699802c922cf3ba99aa.png

This is Fantastic, Eric !

What a great preliminary work ! ❤️

I second A Phoenix . Indeed, this is clear and easy to read.

I like the idea of two trees.

In case you would like to make only one ancestral tree, you could swap Francis Bacon and Robert Devereux, you could place Anthony Bacon to the same level as his brothers at the bottom right with Nicholas Bacon and Anne Bacon right above him, next to Queen Elizabeth.

It would visually mark the proximity between Queen Eizabeth and both her Keeper of the Great Seal and her leading Lady-in-Waiting.

Kind regards.

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

I think your two trees idea is brilliant - double the work but brilliant nevertheless. A Bacon tree would also enable people to see the Cooke, Cecil and Russell links. (very important and well connected families) It's amazing how many people don't realise that the great Lord Burghley was FB's uncle and that Robert Cecil was his cousin. A distinct and different coloured background for his 'common' tree as well - what a great duo!

Very excited by the portraits. I agree, the Oliver portrait doesn't really look like the Gorhambury one, although I was struck by the pale blue eyes (apparently Sir Nicholas had blue eyes as well which would make FB having hazel/brown ones unlikely if he were their son) Would love to see the portraits in colour, let's hope Rosie gives her approval, they should certainly be seen by the public. Do you know if they are on public display at Gorhambury?

Hi A Phoenix

Thank you for your feedback. It all helps, as I have no idea what the end result will look like. 🙂 Yann has just dm'ed me with an improvement in the layout of the tree.

Your support of the dual ancestry idea is heartening. Shall pass on to Julie, as I don't know how often she visits this forum. The two photos Rosie sent were captured straight off the walls of Gorhambury House on her mobile. So I think, yes, they are both on display. Oh to be in England to attend the FBS Grey's Inn tour and make the pilgrimage to St Albans.

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58 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi A Phoenix

Thank you for your feedback. It all helps, as I have no idea what the end result will look like. 🙂 Yann has just dm'ed me with an improvement in the layout of the tree.

Your support of the dual ancestry idea is heartening. Shall pass on to Julie, as I don't know how often she visits this forum. The two photos Rosie sent were captured straight off the walls of Gorhambury House on her mobile. So I think, yes, they are both on display. Oh to be in England to attend the FBS Grey's Inn tour and make the pilgrimage to St Albans.

It starts to get pretty wild if you go back a couple hundred years. I know my tree on Ancestry has hundreds or maybe thousands of little icons! It doubles every generation just counting parents!

2, 4, 8 , 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1,024, 2,048, 4,096, 8,192...

ChatGPT:

If you make a family tree only counting parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc., for 300 years, you would expect to include approximately 8,190 ancestors. This accounts for the doubling of ancestors with each ascending generation, covering 12 generations based on the average generation span of 25 years.

 

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43 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

It starts to get pretty wild if you go back a couple hundred years. I know my tree on Ancestry has hundreds or maybe thousands of little icons! It doubles every generation just counting parents!

2, 4, 8 , 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1,024, 2,048, 4,096, 8,192...

ChatGPT:

If you make a family tree only counting parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc., for 300 years, you would expect to include approximately 8,190 ancestors. This accounts for the doubling of ancestors with each ascending generation, covering 12 generations based on the average generation span of 25 years.

 

Exactly. Everyone has millions of ancestors. We had to abandon the extended family members, which was a difficult decision for Julie and I, and show only the direct path of descent. The worry is that it's too simple, but it gets the point across. The next step is to add in the heraldry (escutcheons that Julie has been collecting). This will add to the visual impact. What I'm struggling with is a suitable background image to give the tree a third dimension and tie everything together in space. Looking through various books on Elizabethan architecture, ornament, etc., as well as searching for the right 'tree' which I have yet to find. It may not exist yet.

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22 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

What I'm struggling with is a suitable background image to give the tree a third dimension and tie everything together in space.

When I play with AI art trying to tie to Bacon's time, "16th century woodcut" designs are one theme I use. 😉

 

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16 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Exactly. Everyone has millions of ancestors. We had to abandon the extended family members, which was a difficult decision for Julie and I, and show only the direct path of descent. The worry is that it's too simple, but it gets the point across. The next step is to add in the heraldry (escutcheons that Julie has been collecting). This will add to the visual impact. What I'm struggling with is a suitable background image to give the tree a third dimension and tie everything together in space. Looking through various books on Elizabethan architecture, ornament, etc., as well as searching for the right 'tree' which I have yet to find. It may not exist yet.

Hi Eric,

To add escutcheons is a great idea.

Talking about a suitable background image, here is another idea. 😉

"Francis Bacon, the Glory of his Age and Nation, the Adorner and Ornament of Learning, was borne in York House or York Place in the Strand"

The_Old_Palace_of_Whitehall_by_Hendrik_D

It could be another image of Whitehall in color, or in black and white for the contrast with the portraits.

Edit:

To stay within the theme of "trees", I also love the following general view of St Albans.

https://www.stalbanshistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/February_2018.pdf

 

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5 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Eric,

To add escutcheons is a great idea.

Talking about a suitable background image, here is another idea. 😉

"Francis Bacon, the Glory of his Age and Nation, the Adorner and Ornament of Learning, was borne in York House or York Place in the Strand"

The_Old_Palace_of_Whitehall_by_Hendrik_D

It could be another image of Whitehall in color, or in black and white for the contrast with the portraits.

Edit:

To stay within the theme of "trees", I also love the following general view of St Albans.

https://www.stalbanshistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/February_2018.pdf

 

Thank you Yann for your interest and ideas. What charming suggestions: background showing Francis's birthplace, York House, or a lithograph of St Albans. My only hesitation is that they are not of the period. Also, the portraits and text on top of either image might detract from both. Hoping for an Elizabethan/English Renaissance feel.

Following Rob's suggestion I've started dabbling in AI image generation. Using mage.space / along with Fotor and Gimp. I'll include a few first attempts for your amusement.

ef01c944eaac457ba78d0aeff65fa523.jpg.bc59f8e58456039e30fa551289726e29.jpg

b8f867d59fd84cc9bd5b57dd5cff351d.jpg.4ad5192032dcc58562732c81d79a588a.jpg

8a2d40c472f84e1c9f462f98cb18827fcopy.jpg.14c2cf14ccb27d711c480cec3abbe6f9.jpg

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

Thank you Yann for your interest and ideas. What charming suggestions: background showing Francis's birthplace, York House, or a lithograph of St Albans. My only hesitation is that they are not of the period. Also, the portraits and text on top of either image might detract from both. Hoping for an Elizabethan/English Renaissance feel.

Following Rob's suggestion I've started dabbling in AI image generation. Using mage.space / along with Fotor and Gimp. I'll include a few first attempts for your amusement.

Impressive! And it is so fun to create with AI.

MidJourney is my favorite, needs a Discord account. I pay like 10 bucks a month never using up my plan even when obsessed with my own art. NightCafe was my first AI tool, and you know how the first always touches one's emotions. I left it but now with a ton of free credits after a year or two of 5 free credits a day if I click the link, I have been enjoying it's special uniqueness.

I love them both for what they do. And of course we have to see what others are doing to learn the possibilities.

My plan was to create a 16th Century Woodcut design related to a family tree and I am satisfied by what you created, Eric! 🙂

 

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54 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Impressive! And it is so fun to create with AI.

MidJourney is my favorite, needs a Discord account. I pay like 10 bucks a month never using up my plan even when obsessed with my own art. NightCafe was my first AI tool, and you know how the first always touches one's emotions. I left it but now with a ton of free credits after a year or two of 5 free credits a day if I click the link, I have been enjoying it's special uniqueness.

I love them both for what they do. And of course we have to see what others are doing to learn the possibilities.

My plan was to create a 16th Century Woodcut design related to a family tree and I am satisfied by what you created, Eric! 🙂

 

Thanks Rob. Just getting started. Will check out the two "tools" that you suggested.

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5 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Thanks Rob. Just getting started. Will check out the two "tools" that you suggested.

I may try yours! There are so many!

What would Bacon think of what we can create in seconds and revise an infinite number of times if we want?

(Made a dozen or two and not happy so far tonight. But I am sleepy...)

 

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PORTRAIT OF NICHOLAS BACON

(A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY)

 

ScreenShot2024-03-06at9_19_50pm.png.fc95089aa83305ca04a1a0e0fa3bea25.png

 

It could be argued that this is one of the most important paintings of the Elizabethan era, and yet it appears to be in desperate need of cleaning and restoration. Most importantly, this picture which originally came from Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire and is now owned by the National Trust has been authenticated, not as a portrait of Thomas Cavendish, but of Sir Nicholas Bacon. In which case, why hasn't the crudely affixed nameplate been removed? 

This painting is new to me, having just come across it while looking for portraits for Julie's genealogy. Once restored it should be hung in the National Portrait Gallery for all to see.  It's the only portrait we have of Sir Nicholas in his fifties. It was painted in 1562 or thereabouts, and is roughly contemporary with the terracotta bust at Gorhambury. The resemblance between the picture and the bust is clear, I think.

NicholasBacon.jpeg.19c79c3ab69d39b01f48651498281af6.jpeg

 

https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/sir-nicholas-bacon-the-elder-15091579-172304/search/terms:moustache/sort_by/date_earliest/order/asc/page/3/view_as/grid

 

https://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/1129161

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

 

PORTRAIT OF NICHOLAS BACON

(A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY)

 

ScreenShot2024-03-06at9_19_50pm.png.fc95089aa83305ca04a1a0e0fa3bea25.png

 

It could be argued that this is one of the most important paintings of the Elizabethan era, and yet it appears to be in desperate need of cleaning and restoration. Most importantly, this picture which originally came from Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire and is now owned by the National Trust has been authenticated, not as a portrait of Thomas Cavendish, but of Sir Nicholas Bacon. In which case, why hasn't the crudely affixed nameplate been removed? 

This painting is new to me, having just come across it while looking for portraits for Julie's genealogy. Once restored it should be hung in the National Portrait Gallery for all to see.  It's the only portrait we have of Sir Nicholas in his fifties. It was painted in 1562 or thereabouts, and is roughly contemporary with the terracotta bust at Gorhambury. The resemblance between the picture and the bust is clear, I think.

NicholasBacon.jpeg.19c79c3ab69d39b01f48651498281af6.jpeg

 

https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/sir-nicholas-bacon-the-elder-15091579-172304/search/terms:moustache/sort_by/date_earliest/order/asc/page/3/view_as/grid

 

https://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/1129161

 

 

WOW ! Incredible ! Thank you for sharing Eric !

For the anecdote, yesterday I ordered a French Book published in 1805 because of one sketch of an engraving of Nicolas Bacon.

"Galerie historique des hommes les plus célèbres" by Landon (1805).

https://www.istockphoto.com/fr/vectoriel/francis-bacon-philosophe-anglais-gravure-sur-cuivre-publié-en-1805-gm614420004-106316719

Notice the error ... F. BACON instead of N. BACON 🙂 

This sketch is based on the following engraving by Adriaen van der Werff c. 1713 ...

https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/explore/collection/work/38005/

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adriaen_van_der_Werff

 

 

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Posted (edited)
43 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

 

PORTRAIT OF NICHOLAS BACON

(A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY)

 

ScreenShot2024-03-06at9_19_50pm.png.fc95089aa83305ca04a1a0e0fa3bea25.png

 

It could be argued that this is one of the most important paintings of the Elizabethan era, and yet it appears to be in desperate need of cleaning and restoration. Most importantly, this picture which originally came from Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire and is now owned by the National Trust has been authenticated, not as a portrait of Thomas Cavendish, but of Sir Nicholas Bacon. In which case, why hasn't the crudely affixed nameplate been removed? 

This painting is new to me, having just come across it while looking for portraits for Julie's genealogy. Once restored it should be hung in the National Portrait Gallery for all to see.  It's the only portrait we have of Sir Nicholas in his fifties. It was painted in 1562 or thereabouts, and is roughly contemporary with the terracotta bust at Gorhambury. The resemblance between the picture and the bust is clear, I think.

NicholasBacon.jpeg.19c79c3ab69d39b01f48651498281af6.jpeg

 

https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/sir-nicholas-bacon-the-elder-15091579-172304/search/terms:moustache/sort_by/date_earliest/order/asc/page/3/view_as/grid

 

https://www.nationaltrustcollections.org.uk/object/1129161

 

 

 

This is a better image. As a portrait, it does more than capture a likeness. Whoever the artist was, they 'got' something of this great man's character too.

NICHOLASBACONHARDWICKHALLLGE.jpeg.f0711dec66625fda2565c899a8373df8.jpeg

Edited by Eric Roberts
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14 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

This is a better image. As a portrait, it does more than capture a likeness. Whoever the artist was, they 'got' something of this man's character too.

NICHOLASBACONHARDWICKHALLLGE.jpeg.f0711dec66625fda2565c899a8373df8.jpeg

 

Footnote: 

The National Trust site tells us that, "the original of the present picture is the portrait at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (of which Sir Nicholas was a benefactor)".

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Hi Eric,

this is a great portrait and like you say gets across very well the gravity of the man as well as a rather mischievous look signalling that a jest may never be far away. I hope the National Trust are persuaded to remove the false inscription and clean and restore this important painting. 

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Posted (edited)

 

 

progress report

 

THE TWO GENEALOGIES  

OF SIR FRANCIS BACON

 

project by

Julie Kemp & Eric Roberts

 

Once we decided there had to be two separate, complementary family trees

the idea of a day tree and a night tree soon followed. 

 

TWOTREES-DAYANDNIGHTcopy.png.3a45f933cba1c25a0ca4895db00702be.png

 

Day Tree = Francis Bacon's public persona

Night Tree = Francis Bacon's secret identity

 

We abandoned the idea of free-standing cut-out figures in favour of 

oval portrait frames, reminiscent of Elizabethan miniatures.

 

NIGHTTREEPORTRAITS.png.7b90ebfbd784c428a4fae9773b3aa79b.png

 

All the portraits above have to be re-framed to focus more on the faces. (Julie's advice).

 

Leaving the night tree at a preliminary mock up stage, the day tree needed to be tackled.

I assumed this would simply be a matter of finding a conventional genealogy online and 

illustrating it with rectangular portrait frames instead of ovals. It appears there is no 

official ancestral tree for Lord Verulam. At least, not that I could find.

 

Our first attempts were not successful because there are so few portraits of the 

relevant ancestors; the rectangular frames don't work as well as the ovals;

Bacon's extended family doesn't fit the image.

 

ScreenShot2024-03-07at7_52_39pm.png.aa087049fbd6031b528d591abccccb21.png

 

 

ScreenShot2024-03-07at10_21_04pm.png.8eb7569d3030d5a6c337d4c266344c7b.png

 

 

It was obvious that the schematic arrangement was wrong.

 

Our current thinking is to keep the day tree idea and try to make it work as simply as possible.

Meanwhile, a separate genealogical chart showing some of FB's extended family will be a separate document.

Here is a schematic layout (still has to be designed)

 

 

ScreenShot2024-03-08at2_36_26pm.png.7eda7dcdf966fc666c42e6049c66c3c9.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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