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The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument


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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

14.

ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST NOBLE FRANCIS LORD

VERULAM VISCOUNT ST. ALBANS.

You at length being dead exultant death in triumph exclaims:- “Nothing greater than this could I have laid low”; Achilles alone destroyed magnanimous Hector, Caesar perished overwhelmed by one blow; death against you a thousand diseases, a thousand shafts had sent, is it credible that otherwise you could have died?

                                                                      THOMAS RHODES, KING’S COLLEGE.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

XIV

ON THE DEATH OF THE NOBLEST OF MEN,

FRANCIS LORD VERULAM, VISCOUNT

ST. ALBAN.

When o’er thee Death at last triumphed, cried he in wild exultation:

“Nothing in all the world greater could I have slain with my arrows.”

All single-handed Achilles1 mangled the great hearted Hector2

Caesar with one blow was murdered, yet at thee Death struck a thousand;-

Aimed thousand shafts at thy vitals, otherwise, could he have slain thee?

                                            THOMAS RHODES, Of King’s College, Cambridge.

1. Homer’s Hero. Legendary Greek Warrior.

2. Trojan Hero. Slain by Achilles.

 

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 14]

On the Death of the Most Noble Francis of Verulam, &c.

“At length thou’rt passed away! Death triumphs joyfully.

‘None greater than this Man,’says he, ‘could I lay low.’

 By bold Achilles’ hand, and with unaided might,

 he great-souled Hector mangled was, and slain,

 So, by one blow, great Caesar fell and died.

 But Death to thee dealt out a thousand illnesses,

 A thousand murd’rous shafts, and had it not been so,

 Can one believe that else thou should’st have died?”

-Thos. Rhodes, Coll. Regal.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND

XIV

On the Death of the Most Noble Man Francis Lord

Verulam, Viscount St. Alban.

At length at thy demise, gay Death holds triumph with himself and says: “Nothing greater than this man could I lay low.” Achilles all alone mangled great hearted Hector, and Caesar struck by one blow fell. To thee had Death given a thousand ills, and sent a thousand darts at thee. Can we believe that thou couldst else have died?

                                                                                                        THOMAS RHODES,

                                                                                  OF KING’S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

 

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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Hi A Phoenix,

I wonder if Thomas Rhodes could have written his Eulogy with the First Folio in mind.

"Caesar struck by one blow fell"

image.png.9bbe72dded29d21f3b288dfc48150195.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/735/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

By one blow or ... 33 wounds ?

And here are the two pages of Troylus and Cressida to explore...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/613/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/614/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

 

 

 

 

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 14]

On the Death of the Most Noble Francis of Verulam, &c.

“At length thou’rt passed away! Death triumphs joyfully.

‘None greater than this Man,’says he, ‘could I lay low.’

 By bold Achilles’ hand, and with unaided might,

 he great-souled Hector mangled was, and slain,

 So, by one blow, great Caesar fell and died.

 But Death to thee dealt out a thousand illnesses,

 A thousand murd’rous shafts, and had it not been so,

 Can one believe that else thou should’st have died?”

-Thos. Rhodes, Coll. Regal.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Very clear and elegantly economical...

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND

XIV

On the Death of the Most Noble Man Francis Lord

Verulam, Viscount St. Alban.

At length at thy demise, gay Death holds triumph with himself and says: “Nothing greater than this man could I lay low.” Achilles all alone mangled great hearted Hector, and Caesar struck by one blow fell. To thee had Death given a thousand ills, and sent a thousand darts at thee. Can we believe that thou couldst else have died?

                                                                                                        THOMAS RHODES,

                                                                                  OF KING’S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

 

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Fiery Phoenixes, thank you for all the work you do in general, and specifically for bringing these memorials to Francis Bacon into the open so we can read them. Eulogistic poetry is not much of a "thing" these days, but back then poets wrote their grief in blood on the page... to mourn with words that carry the weight of an epitaph for someone whose non-existence is an unthinkable fact. Highfaluting Ideals permeate all the texts you have shown us so far. Is this part of the fabric of camouflaged allusions to Francis Bacon's true greatness?

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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

15.

TO THE MEMORY OF THE ILLUSTRIOUS FRANCIS

BACON, BARON VERULAM, VISCOUNT ST. ALBANS.

Roger Bacon of yore a most distinguished Englishman potent in art with burning zeal in days gone by searched out and made known the forces of Nature and the works of art: joining optics to chemistry, mathematics and perspective to physics, the glorious enterprises of his genius, he lives immortal through the gift of distinguished fame. Another Englishman, John Bacon, became famous by explaining the obscure oracles of Holy Scripture. Though the Baconian stock had given many noble pledges, widely celebrated throughout the world, to England, at length it produced this Francis: was ever other of nobler genius? of greater enterprise? of richer eloquence? of ampler mental range? His writings answer; wherein with sharp censure he corrects the works of ancient sages; and in modest volume the Great Instauration, the History of the Winds, the Image of Life and Death reveal his stupendous aims. Who of loftier soul exists unravelling nature and art? Why should I mention each separate work, a number of which of high repute remain? A portion lies buried; for some also Rawley his fidus Achates ensures for Francis, that they should see the light.

                                                                                          ROBERT ASHLEY, OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

XV

IN MEMORY OF THAT MOST ILLUSTRIOUS OF

MEN, FRANCIS BACON, BARON VERULAM,

VISCOUNT ST. ALBAN.

Famed of old was Roger Bacon,1 who, Nature’s forces revealing,

 Followed the quest-eager-breathless. Honored was he by all England.

 Optical Science uniting unto the Chemical wisdom;

 Physical lore-Mathematics, joined unto Knowledge perspective;

 Glorious works of his genius earned him a name most distinguished.

 Also renowned was John Bacon.2 England is proud as his birthplace,

Who from the Scriptures most Sacred unlocked the oracles secret.

 Then, when the same race had yielded many great pledges to England,

 Famed through the world, it bore Francis, than whom none greater in genius!

What man of greater achievements? Who of an eloquence richer?

 Such versatility wondrous, lo! is shown forth in his writings.

 Which with a judgment most piercing censure the works of the Ancients;3

 And in his volume so modest, even The Great Instauration,4

 Shows he his aims most stupendous;-Life and Death’s Image,5 Winds’ History.6

 Who with a spirit more lofty unraveled Art and all Nature?

 Why give them separate mention? His works abound in profusion.

 Part of them truly lie buried,7

but that some part shall be brought forth

 Doth still ensure unto Francis, Rawley,8 his faithful Achates.9

                                                                                             ROBERT ASHLEY,

                                                                                             Of the Middle Temple.

1. Celebrated English Philosopher, 1214-1294. The late Prof. Newbold, of University of Pennsylvania, spent much time studying and interpreting the cryptograms in his work.

2. Celebrated English Divine.

3. Bacon’s great work “The Wisdom of the Ancients.”

4. Bacon’s Philosophical work, literally The Great Restoration.

5. History of Life and Death.

6. History of the Winds.

7. Doubtless refers to his many pseudonymous works, buried under others’ names.

8. Bacon’s chaplain who published his life and work under the title of Resuscitatio. He told much, half revealed much, but left much for the research of future ages.

9. “Fidus Achates,” the faithful companion of Aeneas, Prince of Troy.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 15]

To the Illustrious Man, Francis Bacon, &c.

There was an Englishman of old renowned,

 Great Roger Bacon, who with pains and skill

 Studied the ways of Nature and of Art,

 Tracking their paths with ceaseless, breathless zeal.

 He joined together Optics, Chemistry,

 Physics and Mathematics, too, he joined

 Unto Perspective: this the brilliant work

 Of his own mind. For ever will he live

 In fame as brilliant as imperishing.

 There was another Bacon most illustrious,

 Ioannes, who interpreted the true

 But hidden meaning of the Oracles

Enshrined in Holy Writ. What noble scions

 This house of Bacon has to Britain given;

 Men through the wide world famed. But now at length

 It bears this FRANCIS. Was there e’er a man

Of nobler mind, greater capacities,

 A richer flow of polished eloquence,

 A mind more comprehensive and complete?

 This do his writings teach, wherein he dares

 To censure e’en the monumental works

Of ancient sages, and chastise their errors.

 In one small book we see stupendous boldness:

 The Instauration, History of the Winds,

 The Image that he draws of Life and Death!-

 Who e’er unravelled with a loftier soul

 The mysteries of Nature and the Arts?

 Nor need I number the illustrious works

Which he has left behind. Some buried lie;

 But Rawley, his “Achates” ever true,

 Has given leave that some may see the light.”

 Robert Ashley of the Middle Temple.

Can anyone pass these last four lines without inquiry, or effort to ascertain what works were they which at the time when these verses were printed (1620-1626) lay buried? Where are the manuscripts which Francis Bacon entrusted to the charge of his “faithful Achates,” Dr. William Rawley? In that same collection we should expect to find the original copies of these memorial verses.

 The somewhat occult allusion which compares Bacon to Ioannes tends to confirm a conclusion arrived at by some amongst us, that our poet-theologian was the first who endeavoured to interpret the mysterious symbols and utterances of the Apocalypse. The allusion may, however, be more general, and may refer to his fixed and ever present belief that “every good gift cometh from the Father of Lights,”and that by God’s help all things are possible to him who believes them possible.

 

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TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND

XV

To the Memory of the Most Eminent Man, Francis

Bacon, Baron Verulam, Viscount St. Alban.

Revealing Nature’s powers and the works of Art, potent himself in art, a man of England once1 followed his quest in breathless zeal-Roger Bacon, in former times far famed. Who, uniting Optic Science with Chemical, with Physical, Perspective-these glorious emprises of the mind -liveth forever with the boon of glorious fame. Another man of England too attained renown[1]John Bacon, who unlocked the secret oracles of Sacred Scripture. Albeit the race of Bacon gave to the Britains many pledges, far famed in all the world, at last it bare our Francis. Whoe’er in genius was better born than he? What man of greater undertakings? Who with more wealth of eloquence? Who that revolved more thoughts in his mind? His writings show. In them with piercing judgement, he castigates the works of ancient Sages: in a little book, his great Instauration reveals its stupendous aims: The Histories of Winds, the Image of Life and Death. Who greater-souled than he unbarred Nature and the Arts? Why should I speak of each in turn, when many writings of great fame abound? A part of them lies buried;2 that a part should see the light, Rawley, faithful Achates unto Francis, hath achieved.

                                                                                                               ROBERT ASHLEY,

                                                                                                   OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE.

_____________________________________________________________________

1. Like Lucretius’ primum Graius homo, i. 66.

2. i. e. still in the manuscript, unedited.

 

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Nor need I number the illustrious works

Which he has left behind. Some buried lie;

 But Rawley, his “Achates” ever true,

 Has given leave that some may see the light.”

"...some may see the light." 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Robert Ashley (1565-1641)

founder of Middle Temple library

 

RobertAshleyfull-length.jpeg.e59dec4914afcf57ae38a97c1b7e3ad8.jpeg

Robert Ashley, a member of the Middle Temple, died in 1641,

bequeathing all of his books to the Inn to found a library there,

and £300 to employ a Library Keeper. 

https://www.middletemple.org.uk/archive-history/archive-information-access/sources-resources/digitised-records/library-manuscript

 

 

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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

16.

ON THE HISTORY OF LIFE AND DEATH, BY LORD

FRANCIS BACON, LATELY DECEASED.

Writer of the History of Life and Death, O! Bacon! deserving to die late, nay rather to live for ever, why, departed one, do you prefer the everlasting shades, and so destroy with yourself us, who will not survive you? You have written, O! Bacon! the history of the life and death of us all; who, I ask, is capable of (writing) the history either of your life or death? alas! Nay, give place, O Greeks! give place, Maro, first in Latin story.1 Supreme both in eloquence and writing, under every head renowned, famous in council chamber and lecture hall;  In war too, if war would submit to art,2 surpassing in every pursuit, under every title, a very Chiron;3 a despiser of wealth, and while he reckons gold less than light air, he exchanges earthly realms for the sky, the ground for the stars.

1. Cf., “Leave thee alone, for the comparison Of all that insolent Greece or haughtie Rome Sent forth."- From Ben Jonson’s Poem prefixed to First Folio. In his “Discoveries” he gives to Bacon the self-same superiority over “insolent Greece and haughtie Rome.”

2. Marte idem. Bacon here is declared great alike “in the field and in the Cabinet.” But where did he distinguish himself as a military genius except in the plays of Shakespeare, where the soldiership is said to be as perfect as the seamanship or any other excellency of knowledge of all the “mysteries” of arts and crafts therein contained? It is known that Bacon was a master in all (or nearly all) arts and crafts, liberal and mechanical; nothing of the kind is known about Shakspere the actor.

3. Semihomo. This word here means Centaur. Chiron, the wisest and justest of the Centaurs and the son of Saturn, was renowned for skill in hunting, medicine, music, prophecy, &c. Himself the pupil of Apollo and Diana, he became the teacher in the above-mentioned arts of the most famous heroes of Grecian story-Peleus, Achilles, Diomedes, &c

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

XVI

ON THE HISTORY OF LIFE AND DEATH1 BY

THE LATE SIR FRANCIS BACON.

 Writer of Life and Death history, long life deservedst thou, Bacon!

 Yea! worthy life everlasting; why, pray, departed one, wilt thou

 Dwell with the shades and them cherish, slaying us who’ll not survive thee.

 Life and Death history, Oh Bacon, of all of us hast thou written;

 But, who shall write thy great story, who, pray, of thy life or thy death?

 Give place, Oh Greece! Yield thee Maro,2 first tho thou be in Rome’s Story.3

 Eloquence thine in supremacy; powerful of pen, great in all things,

 Famous in council, on platform; Aye, even Mars thou excellest,

 If Mars4 to art proves submissive. Superman, thou in all titles,-

 Wealth thou despisest, regarding gold as the breeze of the night-air;

 This world exchanging for heaven; earth for the stars and their brightness.

 

1. Bacon’s great work.

2. Vergil’s full name was Publius Vergilius Maro.

3. Meaning that the greatest historians of neither Greece nor Rome are competent to write Bacon’s history. Suggests Jonson’s Preface to First Folio, and his article on Bacon in the Discoveries. In the former, he says:

“Leave thee alone for the comparison

Of all that insolent Greece or haughtie Rome

Sent forth.”

In the latter:

“He who hath filled up all numbers, and performed that in our tongue which may be compared or preferred either to insolent Greece or haughtie Rome.”

In the same paragraph, Jonson gives a list of the men noted for letters in his day but makes no mention of Shakespeare the Actor whom he mentions only in his connection with the theatre and plainly intimates his illiteracy.

4. God of War. As Bacon was a man of Peace, this reference suggests that Mars was pictured as the Shaker of the Spear, Quirinus.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 16]

On the Death of the Lord Francis Bacon, Historian of Life and Death.

“Thyself Historian of Life and Death,

 Thou should’st, O Bacon, late in life have died,

 Or else for ever lived. Why dost thou bring

 Such darkness, by th’ extinction of thy life?

 And why, since without thee we cannot live,

 Dost thou, departing, also blot us out?

 The life and death of each of us thou hast,

 O Bacon! in thy writings chronicled;

 But of thine own life, or thy death, I ask,

 What true, sufficient history has been writ?

 Give place, ye Greeks, great Maro e’en give way,

 Foremost in history of Latium;

 In speech, in writing most excelling; famed

 In Council-Chamber as in Learning’s Schools.

 In arts of Mars (if Mars submit to Art)

 He still excelled: a Demi-god in skill,

 In every branch of knowledge, all pursuits

 Which have a glorious title, he excelled.

 Wealth he despises; gold he holds to be

 Far lighter than the unsubstantial air.

 The kingdoms of the world he quits for Heaven,

 And joyfully exchanges Earth for Stars.”

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND

XVI

On the History of Life and Death, by the late Sir

Francis Bacon.

Thou writer of the history of life and death, Bacon, worthy late to die, aye, rather ever to live, why dost thou, extinct, so cherish the shades, and thus efface us with thyself, who shall not live after thee? Thou hast written, Bacon, the history of the life and death of us all. Prithee who shall write well the story either of thy life or death-ah who? Nay, yield, ye Greeks, yield Maro, first in Latin history.1

Most excellent in both the spoken and the written word, and famed in whatever way,2 great at counsel3 and in the school;4 excelling too in Mars, if Mars could suffer art,5 and in every title, in every aim, more than a man.6 Despiser of wealth, the while he rates gold lower than the unsubstantial breeze, he changes earthly realms for the sky, and the ground for the stars.

_____________________________________________________________________

1. cf. Propertius, iii. 34, 65, cedite Romani Scriptores cedite Graii.

2. The full construction would be, non est nomen quo non inclytus erat.

3. Refers to his career as Privy Councillor, or to his statesmanship in general.

4. Refers to his attainments in philosophy.

5. Meurer’s interpretation (p. 111), ‘if Mars could suffer him this art,’seems pointless.

6. A queer use of semihomo. In classical Latin it means ‘half-beast,’ not ‘half-god.’

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On 2/19/2024 at 4:14 AM, A Phoenix said:

TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

15.

TO THE MEMORY OF THE ILLUSTRIOUS FRANCIS

BACON, BARON VERULAM, VISCOUNT ST. ALBANS.

Roger Bacon of yore a most distinguished Englishman potent in art with burning zeal in days gone by searched out and made known the forces of Nature and the works of art: joining optics to chemistry, mathematics and perspective to physics, the glorious enterprises of his genius, he lives immortal through the gift of distinguished fame. Another Englishman, John Bacon, became famous by explaining the obscure oracles of Holy Scripture. Though the Baconian stock had given many noble pledges, widely celebrated throughout the world, to England, at length it produced this Francis: was ever other of nobler genius? of greater enterprise? of richer eloquence? of ampler mental range? His writings answer; wherein with sharp censure he corrects the works of ancient sages; and in modest volume the Great Instauration, the History of the Winds, the Image of Life and Death reveal his stupendous aims. Who of loftier soul exists unravelling nature and art? Why should I mention each separate work, a number of which of high repute remain? A portion lies buried; for some also Rawley his fidus Achates ensures for Francis, that they should see the light.

                                                                                          ROBERT ASHLEY, OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Here's an example of someone who writes that Rawley is in possession of something that should see the light. This has been taken literally by some when in fact it could very well mean that there was much that was unprinted lying in Bacon's papers. One could chase this suggestion to Oak Island by further interpreting various texts just just as ripe for the pickings by one's imagination. 

Here someone is also telling us that Francis is of Baconian stock when others will tell you that this isn't the case at all. How can some be so wrong? 

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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

17.

TO THE SAME MOST ELOQUENT PERSONAGE.

Let expediency consider the better parts of counsel, but add, a poet from Ithaca, and you hold

all.4

   E. F., KING’S COLLEGE.

4. No one can deny the extreme obscurity of this couplet. Moniti meliora sequamur are Anchises’ words in AEn. III. 188. Admonished let us follow better counsels. But the two words moniti meliora are inscribed on the outer scroll of the left-hand title-page of the Frankfurt edition of Bacon’s works 1665, while inside is written the motto of the Bacon family, mediocria firma-moderation is strength. It seems to me that the two phrases are to be taken as forming one sentence. The meaning would then be: the best part of counsel is what combines strength and moderation. Now, applying this to the couplet, and in the light of what is now known of Bacon, the writer seems to warn the literary intimates of Bacon not to tell too much or claim too much for him, but that his memory would be best served, and the ends he had in view best promoted, by making no seemingly exaggerated claims of authorship, as in justice might be done; but to be moderate and yet to intimate that he was “a concealed poet” (ex Ithaca fandi factor), which virtually covers the whole ground of the Baconian contention. Fictor fandi Ulixes (AEn. IX. 602) means Ulysses the counterfeiter or feigner, but fictor fandi would also signify poet (“The truest poetry is the most feigning,” As You Like It III. 3); so Ex Ithaca fandi fictor well suggests the “concealed poet,” as Bacon writes to Sir John Davies he was.[William A. Sutton, ‘Literal Translation Of The “Manes Verulamiani”’, Baconiana, Vol. IV, Third Series, No. 14, April, 1906, pp. 110-16]

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

XVII

TO THE SAME MOST ELOQUENT MAN.

 

Let the best counsels, of Prudence, warned of a destiny higher

Add but the Master of Fable from Ithaca,1 then hold you all men.

                                                                                        E. F.,

                                                                               King’s College.

1. This couplet is admittedly and doubtless intentionally obscure. It reads as though intended as a warning to the other eulogists not to divulge too much of the high destiny for which Bacon was intended and to remember how as a poet “in a despised weed” he had wrought the good of all men.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 17]

Translation.-If you wish to understand Bacon, it is useful to see (the motto) “moniti meliora,”

give sage counsel. But add to this a composer of fiction, and you understand him altogether,

understand his whole character.

                                                                                                              E. F. REGAL

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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