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The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument


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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND

VI

On the Death of the Most Honored Sir1 Francis

Bacon, of late High1 Chancellor of England, &c.

Thou bold exemplar of how far the human mind may rise; thou talented deliverer of thine age; the while thou dost happily repair the meagre arts and ease free2 necks of their ancient yoke, how shall thy funeral be mourned, that now comes on? What tears do thy fates demand, what mean they? Did Parent Nature fear lest she lie naked while thy hand stripped her sacred robe? Were the world’s hidden corners bared to thine eyes, and did no cranny escape thy gaze? Or, can it be, did she who was betrothed to ancient lords, spurn the embraces of her newest spouse? Or, in fine, ruinous to the good and envious of endeavor,3 did she snap thy life’s threads, which rather should have been prolonged? Thus, that the Sicilian old man4 might not soar beyond the crystal sphere,5 he fell by a private’s sword. Thou, too, Francis, hast for this received thy fate, that the forbidden task should not be finished.

_____________________________________________________________________

1. Perhaps domini here = ‘Lord,’ as the office of Chancellor is mentioned. Or should Magni be rendered not ‘High’ but Lord’?

2. Prolepsis, common in Latin poetry; i. e. ‘ease and set free.’

3. Read coeptis as in B., not caeptis.

4. i. e. Archimedes.

5. In the sense of Lucretiuss flammantia moenia mundi {i. 73}. He was not to pursue his investigations too far into the divine.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Hi A Phoenix

Father Sutton's translation had me flummoxed. Parker's was more transparent. Rand's though was more mysterious:    

Thou, too, Francis, hast for this received thy fate, that the forbidden task should not be finished.

Edited by Eric Roberts
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"Thus, lest Archimedes should soar beyond the crystal sphere, he fell by the sword of a legionary.
And you, O Francis, have therefore met your doom, lest the work, which should not have been essayed, should be completed."

All versions touch on this. Their translations seem to agree that Bacon's work is "unfinished." Why does that sound so familiar to me. And "New Atlantis" was not in print yet, not even registered until 4th of July, 1626.  🙂

Or was it in print when the eulogies were written?

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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

7.

TO THE SAME.

 Some there are though dead live in marble, and trust all their duration to long lasting columns; others shine in bronze, or are beheld in yellow gold, and deceiving themselves think they deceive the fates. Another division of men surviving in a numerous offspring, like Niobe3 irreverent, despise the mighty gods; but your fame adheres not to sculptured columns, nor is read on the tomb (with) “Stay, traveller, your steps”; if any progeny recalls their sire, not of the body is it, but born, so to speak, of the brain, as Minerva from Jove’s: first your virtue provides you with an everlasting monument, your books another not soon to collapse, a third your nobility; let the fates now celebrate their triumphs, who have nothing yours, Francis, but your corpse. Your mind and good report the better parts survive; you have nothing of so little value as to ransom the vile body withal.

                                                                                                    T. VINCENT, Trinity College.

3. Niobe was so proud of her numerous children that she despised Latona, mother of Diana and Apollo, who therefore slew her children. Niobe herself was changed by Jupiter into a stone.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

VII

ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST HONORABLE LORD

FRANCIS BACON, LATE LORD HIGH

CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND.

 Some there be who, when departed, still would live on in the marble,

 Trusting to long lasting columns, Memory-fame-immortality

 Some in bronze, some in gold shining, self-deceived, think the fates cheated;

 Others leave numerous offspring, scorning the great gods like Niobe.1

 Thy renown doth not depend upon columns engraven nor epitaphs,

 Halting the steps of the traveler; and, who would claim thee as parent,

 Be not the fruit of thy body, but of Jove’s brain like Minerva;2

 Virtue be now thy first monument, second, thy books long-enduring,

 Third thy nobility, Fate holding nought but thy body in triumph;

 Thy mind and fame still surviving, ne’er shall thy poor clay be ransomed.

                                                                                 T. VINCENT,

                                                                                  Trinity College.

 

1. Niobe, proud of her many children, was punished for scorning the mother of Apollo who had but

two.

2. Minerva, Goddess of Wisdom, sprang from the brain of Jupiter.

 

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 7]

To the Same.

 “Some men believe that, being dead, they yet

 Will live in Marble; that eternal fame

 Is theirs by reason of their many works.

 And others shine in brass, or blaze in gold,

 And, self-deceiving, think to cheat the Fates.

 Another sort of men, like Niobe,

 Survive their numerous seed, and scorn the gods.

 No lofty column doth proclaim thy glory

 Nor on thy tomb read we –‘Stay passenger.’

 Should any man desire perchance to trace

 The parentage of this Great Progeny,

 ’Tis not corporeal, but, Minerva-like,

 Sprung from the brain of Jupiter himself.

 First a perpetual monument is found

 In thine own virtue. Secondly, thy books

 No sooner than thy virtue can decay;

 Thirdly, we rank thy fame’s nobility.

 E’en now the Fates thy triumph do foretell.

 Those Fates, O Francis, can but take thy clay;

 Thy better part- Mind, Reason, and good name,

 Survive the body gladly rendered up.”

 - T. Vincent, Trin. Coll.

 

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND

VII

On the Same.

Some there are who, dead, would live in marble, and entrust their immortality to aged pillars; Some shine in bronze,1 or glitter in yellow gold,1 and while they cheat themselves, think that they cheat the fates. Another breed of humankind, surviving with numerous progeny, like Niobe unjustly scorns the great gods.2 But thy renown neither clings to graven columns nor does thy tomb read,3 “Traveler, stay thy course.”4 If any offspring should recall his parent, ’t is not that of his body, but such as Minerva, sprung from the brain of Jove.5 First thy virtue bestows on thee perennial monument: and second-not soon to perish-thy books: third, thy nobility. Now let the Fates hold triumph, who, Francis, have nothing of thee but thy body. Both thy better parts, thy mind and thy good fame survive: thou holdest it not dear to ransom the vile corpse.

                                                                                                            T. VINCENT, T. C.

                                                                                                 (i. e. OF TRINITY COLLEGE.)

_____________________________________________________________________

1. i. e. have statues of bronze or gold erected to their memory.

2. i. e. imagine they never shall die.

3. Meurer, p. 103, would (inappropriately) change legitur to tegitur.

4. i. e. bear some conventional eulogy. Siste viator iter is a frequent heading in epitaphs.

5. i. e. his immortality is not to be transmitted through his descendants in the flesh: his qualities ensure

his fame.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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Hi A Phoenix,

I must confess that I was waiting for your posts about this Elegy to share with you some thoughts, one of them involving a number dear to Rob's heart : 188 😊

image.png.bfafa71ac5d86b2dcfbf4dacc95bae48.png

The sum of the capital Letters in acrostic is : 188

And here is the page 188 of Minerva Britanna :

image.png.96707251d24109f3035cb3bdcd132a7a.png

https://archive.org/details/minervabritannao00peac/page/188/mode/1up?q=minerva

And I admit that it may sound a bit far-fetched but if we do not take in count the titles and signatures of the Elegies, only the verses, including the introduction by Rawley :

"Sed quasi de cerbro nata Minerva Jovis" is the 165th line.

If we add the 12 lines of the Title-page, it gives us 165 + 12 = 177

177 = WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (Simple cipher)

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND

VII

On the Same.

Some there are who, dead, would live in marble, and entrust their immortality to aged pillars; Some shine in bronze,1 or glitter in yellow gold,1 and while they cheat themselves, think that they cheat the fates. Another breed of humankind, surviving with numerous progeny, like Niobe unjustly scorns the great gods.2 But thy renown neither clings to graven columns nor does thy tomb read,3 “Traveler, stay thy course.”4 If any offspring should recall his parent, ’t is not that of his body, but such as Minerva, sprung from the brain of Jove.5 First thy virtue bestows on thee perennial monument: and second-not soon to perish-thy books: third, thy nobility. Now let the Fates hold triumph, who, Francis, have nothing of thee but thy body. Both thy better parts, thy mind and thy good fame survive: thou holdest it not dear to ransom the vile corpse.

                                                                                                            T. VINCENT, T. C.

                                                                                                 (i. e. OF TRINITY COLLEGE.)

_____________________________________________________________________

1. i. e. have statues of bronze or gold erected to their memory.

2. i. e. imagine they never shall die.

3. Meurer, p. 103, would (inappropriately) change legitur to tegitur.

4. i. e. bear some conventional eulogy. Siste viator iter is a frequent heading in epitaphs.

5. i. e. his immortality is not to be transmitted through his descendants in the flesh: his qualities ensure

his fame.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Hi A Phoenix

Thank you so much for sharing the multiple translations of these little-known, seldom-read and barely understood elegies to Lord Bacon. It's brilliant of you to bring them out into the light so they can be read and admired again.

Thomas Vincent is another mystery man, with no portrait or biography as such. But as you mention in "The Secret Links..." he wrote a play (in Latin) called "Paria", published in 1648, fifteen years after he died at the young age of 30. Here is what you wrote:

 

THOMAS VINCENT (c. 1603-1633)

Educated at Westminster School he moved up to Trinity College, Cambridge in 1618. He graduated BA 1622, was made a fellow of Trinity College in 1624, before proceeding MA in 1625 and BD in 1632. He became a Minister at St. Edward’s, Cambridge in 1631 and vicar of Blyth, Nottinghamshire in 1633. He was a close friend of his contemporary at Westminster and Trinity College, the poet and dramatist Thomas Randolph (elegy 32). He contributed a Latin verse to Randolph’s Jealous Lovers published in 1632. The play is dedicated ‘To the Right Worshipful Mr. Dr. Comber, Dean of Carleil, Vice-chancellour of the Universitie of Cambridge, and Master of Trinity-Colledge’. This is followed by a poem signed ‘Your admiring servant, T[homas R[andoph]’ addressed to Bacon’s disciple ‘To that compleat and noble Knight, Sir Kenellam Digbie’, a member of his Rosicrucian Brotherhood and one of the founders of Bacon’s Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Royal Society: ‘SIr, when I look on you, me thinks I see/To the full height, how perfect man may be.’ His kinsman Augustine Vincent (c.1584-1626) the well-known herald and antiquarian was one of the earliest owners of the Shakespeare First Folio. He was presented with a copy of it by William Jaggard with its title page bearing the inscription ‘Ex dono Willmi Jaggard Typographi, Anno 1623’.

He also wrote a Latin play entitled Paria. Acta coram sereniss. Rege Carolo first published in 1648. In his introduction to a modern facsimile edition of the play Stephen Berkowitz draws attention to the influence of The Comedy of Errors. It was first printed in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio which suggests that Vincent either owned a copy of the First Folio or had access to it:

One may find in several of Shakespeare’s works precedents for Vincent’s reworking of a tale of mistaken identities, true and false transformations, and lovers separated by the consequences of street violence. Although there are few phrases which exclusively link the two plays, the influence of The Comedy of Errors is, as one might expect, the most pervasive.

He also highlights and details the influence of The Merchant of Venice echoed in Paria:

One might expect in portraying a miserly Jew Vincent could not evade the influence of The Merchant of Venice. And indeed there are details no in Paria’s Italian source which could derive from Shakespeare’s play...

https://lib-cat.trin.cam.ac.uk/Record/05e8ad44-9062-4b26-a701-d84b9cf46205/Holdings#tabnav

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=895339006 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

We feel honoured and privileged to have the opportunity to finally bring the critically important Memoriae verses into the full light of day together with their four translations on B'Hive/sirbacon.org to provide Baconians and other interested scholars with ready and easy access to them in perpetuity. 

It is also provides a further opportunity for our B'Hive community with its unusual minds and learning to further illuminate and explain aspects of the verses which have remained hidden and obscure for the last four hundred years as part of our collective efforts to bring forth the Secret Truth about Lord Bacon to a much wider audience.  

Thank you.   

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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

8.

ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST NOBLE LORD FRANCIS,

BARON VERULAM, &C.

Formerly so many good parts seemed to me impossible either to co-exist in one, or ever to have died; with these, as the heavens with stars, your life was resplendent, and all have followed you to the grave. Genius and eloquence flowing with mighty stream, the ornament equally of the philosopher and the judge. Now I see such things could be; but friends refrain, if he returns not, neither will they I ween.

                                                                                                       I. VINCENT, Trin. Col.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

VIII

ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST NOBLE LORD

FRANCIS BARON VERULAM, VISCOUNT

ST. ALBAN.

In the times past, I bethought me, virtues so large, co-existent,

 On Earth impossible, or else ever firm proof ’gainst Death’s arrow.

 Yet, as the heaven with stars filled, so has thy life been resplendent;

 All of these graces were thine and thee to the grave all have followed.

Genius and eloquence flowing forth in a stream so tremendous,

 Both equal ornaments they of philosopher, sage and of jurist.

 Now I can see they existed, that they have passed from among us;-

 But enough - unless he comes back, never will such traits return here.

                                                                                        I. VINCENT,

                                                                                         Trinity College.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 8]

Dirge on the Death of the Most Illustrious, Brilliant and Heroic

Lord Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam.

“Till now I thought that such a wealth of gifts

 Could never co-exist in any man,

 Or that they ne’er could perish. Such seemed those

 With which thy life shone, like the heaven with stars,

 And followed still thy train of destiny.

 So great a mind! such flood of eloquence!

 The Jurist’s fame, Philosopher’s, no less!

 But now I see that this was possible;

 Yet (pardon me, my friends, for saying this)

 I think that if he comes not back to us,

 Neither will gifts like these be seen again.”

                               - J. Vincent, Trin. Coll.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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 TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND

VIII On the Death of the Most Noble Sir, Francis, Baron, Verulam &c.

 Once did I deem neither that so many virtues could dwell in one man, nor that they would ever die: with the which thy life shone like the heaven with stars, and which have all followed thine own fate1 -genius and eloquence flowing in generous stream, the glory of sage and of jurist too.1 I see now that this might have been-but friends, enough. If he shall not return, I think not that such traits will come again. I. VINCENT, T. C. (i. e. OF TRINITY COLLEGE.) __________________________________________________________________________________

1. i. e. departed with thee.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

 TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND

VIII On the Death of the Most Noble Sir, Francis, Baron, Verulam &c.

 Once did I deem neither that so many virtues could dwell in one man, nor that they would ever die: with the which thy life shone like the heaven with stars, and which have all followed thine own fate1 -genius and eloquence flowing in generous stream, the glory of sage and of jurist too.1 I see now that this might have been-but friends, enough. If he shall not return, I think not that such traits will come again. I. VINCENT, T. C. (i. e. OF TRINITY COLLEGE.) __________________________________________________________________________________

1. i. e. departed with thee.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

JOHN VINCENT

He was a brother to Thomas, most likely a younger brother. The Westminster School records do not register his attendance, although it is certain his brother was educated there. He did however follow his brother to Trinity College, Cambridge where he matriculated in 1621, graduating BA in 1626, made a fellow of Trinity College in 1627, before proceeding to MA in 1629. He may have been ordained priest at Peterborough on 18 December 1631. His will was proved by his brother Thomas Vincent on 15 May 1632. (A Phoenix)

I wonder why both brothers died so young.

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Just now, Eric Roberts said:

JOHN VINCENT

He was a brother to Thomas, most likely a younger brother. The Westminster School records do not register his attendance, although it is certain his brother was educated there. He did however follow his brother to Trinity College, Cambridge where he matriculated in 1621, graduating BA in 1626, made a fellow of Trinity College in 1627, before proceeding to MA in 1629. He may have been ordained priest at Peterborough on 18 December 1631. His will was proved by his brother Thomas Vincent on 15 May 1632. (A Phoenix)

I wonder why both brothers died so young.

Just realised that the translation by E K Rand is on SirBacon 

https://sirbacon.org/archives/Manes Verulamani Thirty_Two_Poems.pdf

ScreenShot2024-02-12at9_02_08pm.png.32f4861a810118ab11bc1b9a8061727a.png

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On 2/11/2024 at 5:20 AM, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

We feel honoured and privileged to have the opportunity to finally bring the critically important Memoriae verses into the full light of day together with their four translations on B'Hive/sirbacon.org to provide Baconians and other interested scholars with ready and easy access to them in perpetuity. 

It is also provides a further opportunity for our B'Hive community with its unusual minds and learning to further illuminate and explain aspects of the verses which have remained hidden and obscure for the last four hundred years as part of our collective efforts to bring forth the Secret Truth about Lord Bacon to a much wider audience.  

Thank you.   

Thank You A. Phoenix for bringing  Focus to these 4  Memoriae Translations. Invaluable!

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TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

9.

A THRENODY ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS

AND RENOWNED PERSONAGE, SIR FRANCIS BACON, BARON VERULAM.

 Muses, now pour forth your perennial waters in lamentations, and let Apollo shed tears (plentiful as the water) which even the Castalian stream contains; for neither would meagre dirges befit so great a loss, nor our moderate drops the mighty monument. The very nerve of genius, the marrow of persuasion, the golden stream of eloquence,4 the precious gem of concealed literature,5 the noble Bacon (ah! the relentless warp of the three sisters) has fallen by the fates. O how am I in verse like mine to commemorate you, sublime Bacon! and those glorious memorials of all the ages composed by your genius and by Minerva. With what learned, beautiful, profound matters the Great Instauration is full! With what light does it scatter the darksome moths of the ancient sages! creating from chaos a new wisdom: thus God Himself will with potent hand restore the body laid in the tomb; therefore you do not die (O Bacon!) for the Great Instauration will liberate you from death and darkness and the grave.

                                                                                                                                   R. C., T. C.

4. The metre, a spondee, a dactyl and three trochees require Tagus to be taken for the river famous for its golden sand. The first syllable is long in the Greek word signifying commander, otherwise an excellent rendering.

5. If the writer wished to allude to Bacon’s reference to himself as a “concealed poet,” the phrase, reconditarum et gemma pretiosa literarum, answers the purpose very well. “Recondite literature” will do too.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER

IX

ON THE DEATH OF THAT MOST ILLUSTRIOUS

AND RENOWNED HERO, LORD FRANCIS

BACON, BARON VERULAM. A

THRENODY.

 Muses, now pour forth your waters in loud lamentations perennial;

 Yea, let Apolloshed tears now as plentiful too as the water

Castaly’s 2 stream overflowing; neither were our dirges meagre,

 To such a great loss befitting, nor our poor tears to such sepulchre.

 Thou the nerve-center of genius, Yea, of persuasion the marrow,

Eloquence’ stream3 and the jewel most precious of letters concealed,4

Bacon, the noble, art fallen by the three sisters5 relentless!

 Oh! how shall my verse, great Bacon, eulogize thee and thy labors,

 Built for all ages, and born of Minerva6 and thy matchless genius?

 Filled with what beauty and learning profound is The Great Instauration;7

 Yea! with what light does it scatter the moth-darkened sages of old-time,

 Bringing new wisdom from chaos; Thus will the hand of Almighty

 Bring to thy tomb resurrection. Therefore thou diest not, Bacon!

 Ever from Death, Grave and Darkness, The Great Instauration8 will free thee!

                                                                                                                   R. C.

                                                                                                         Trinity College.

1. God of Poetry and leader of the Muses.

2. Castalia, an ancient Fountain on the slope of Mount Parnassus sacred to Apollo and the Muses.

3. Literally, Tagus of Eloquence. Tagus being the largest river in Spain.

4. Latin “reconditarum.” Obvious reference to Bacon’s description of himself as a “concealed poet.”

5. Three Fates. Clotho the spinner. Lachesis the caster of lots. Atropos of the shears, the inevitable.

6. Goddess of Wisdom.

7. Bacon’s great Philosophical work, “The Great Renewal or Resurrection.”

8. A comparison of his work with the General Resurrection.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY

[ELEGY 9]

“Muses, now pour perennial waters forth

In funeral dirges, and in streams of tears.

 Apollo’s floods, shed from Castalian springs,

 May emptied be. For these our scanty drops -

Suffice not for the death of one so great,

 Nor crown thee, and fill up thy boundless praise.

 Persuasion’s marrow! sinew of genius!

 E’en Tagus doth recite most precious gems

Of hidden verse, and priceless literature.

 ’Twas by the Fates (ah! cruel sisters three,

 Harsh race ye be), that noble BACON died.

 Now to the height our songs shall celebrate

 Thy name, and ever keep thy memory green.

 Will not Minerva to thy genius grant

(She will not sure begrudge thy genius)

 Those glorious monuments of Praise and Fame

 Which all the Ages met in one will rear?

 How learned, graceful, deep, and full a thing

 Is thy great work-The Instauration.

 How has it, by its light, dispelled the clouds

 Of sophists, and their old worm-eaten books,

From Chaos bringing New Philosophy-

 Philosophy from Chaos new-creating.

 God by His potent hand revived and raised

A man’s dead body from the sepulchre,

 Therefore, O BACON, neither shalt thou perish.

 From Death, from Darkness, and from Sepulchre,

 GREAT INSTAURATION keeps thee ever sure.”

- R. C., Trin. Coll.

Classical scholars, to whom we are deeply indebted for help and useful hints, have sent us the following notes:-“Tagus of oratory” means Leader of oratory. Tagus is a Greek word in Latin letters, Tagos = a commander, arranger, organiser, leader,” &c.

 Another learned translator of the lines 8 and 9 is, however, of opinion that Tagus there does mean the river Tagus. Here again, then, we perceive one of the quibbles, confusing to the reader (and doubtless so intended), but which, when apprehended, are confirmatory of certain theories, and add to the pile of cumulative evidence which is based, not upon any of these verses, but upon far different foundations.

 In the concluding lines happy use is made of Bacon’s teaching in the “Essay of Cupid.”

“The particulars related by the poets of Cupid, or Love, do not properly agree to the same person; yet they differ only so far, that if the confusion of persons be rejected, the correspondence may hold. They say, that Love was the most ancient of all the gods, and existed before everything else except chaos,which is held coeval therewith…Love is represented absolutely without progenitor, excepting only that he is said to have proceeded from the Egg of Nox (Night); but that he himself begot the gods, and all things else, on chaos.”

The object of Francis Bacon’s Love was, we know, “The Beautiful Lady”- his “Sovereign Mistress,”

Truth; without whom he could not live, and whom, as he said, he would woo and win in the form of Natural Philosophy. The New Philosophy was no mere invention of his own; it was drawn by pious and patient study of “the Two Books of God,” from the Bible-the Book of God’s will- and from Nature-the Book of God’s works. Not from “the worm-eaten books” of the schoolmen, alluded to in the poem (the “vermicular” learning against which Bacon protests), but from the Word and Works of God Himself did our greatest poet draw his ideas, and the vital parts of his living and moving philosophy:- “Philosophy from Chaos new creating.”

He it was who, dispelling the clouds, “the gross vapours” of a night of darkness and ignorance, brought to the world the light of the Renaissance.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND

IX

Threnody on the Death of the Most Illustrious and

Most Eminent Hero, Sir Francis Bacon,

Baron Verulam.

Pour now ye Muses your perennial founts into a song of woe, and let Apollo shed in tears whatever even the stream of Castaly contains. For no humble dirge would befit so great a death, nor moderate drops crown this stupendous tomb. The Sinews of Wit, the Marrow of Persuasion, the Tagus1 of Eloquence, the Precious Gem of Recondite Letters,2 has fallen by the Fates (ah me, the three sisters’ cruel threads!)-The noble Bacon, Ah how can I extol thee greatest Bacon, in my lay! or how those glorious monuments of all ages, chiselled by thy genius, by Minerva.3 How full thy Instauratio Magna of matter learned, elegant, profound! With what light hath it dispelled the gloomy moths of ancient sages, creating new Wisdom out of Chaos! So God Himself with potent hand will restore the body consigned to the tomb.4 Thus Bacon, thou shalt not die; for from death, from the shades, from the tomb, thy great Instauration shall deliver thee.5

                                                                                                                                 R. C. T. C.

                                                                                                  (i. e. OF TRINITY COLLEGE.)

___________________________________________________________________________

1. i. e. golden stream.

2. i. e. his philosophical works.

3. or by thy genius and thy wit.

4. i. e. as God vouchsafed a resurrection to the human body, so Bacon to the old philosophers.

5. i. e. this great resurrection is token of thine own

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53 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON

9.

A THRENODY ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS

AND RENOWNED PERSONAGE, SIR FRANCIS BACON, BARON VERULAM.

 Muses, now pour forth your perennial waters in lamentations, and let Apollo shed tears (plentiful as the water) which even the Castalian stream contains; for neither would meagre dirges befit so great a loss, nor our moderate drops the mighty monument. The very nerve of genius, the marrow of persuasion, the golden stream of eloquence,4 the precious gem of concealed literature,5 the noble Bacon (ah! the relentless warp of the three sisters) has fallen by the fates. O how am I in verse like mine to commemorate you, sublime Bacon! and those glorious memorials of all the ages composed by your genius and by Minerva. With what learned, beautiful, profound matters the Great Instauration is full! With what light does it scatter the darksome moths of the ancient sages! creating from chaos a new wisdom: thus God Himself will with potent hand restore the body laid in the tomb; therefore you do not die (O Bacon!) for the Great Instauration will liberate you from death and darkness and the grave.

                                                                                                                                   R. C., T. C.

4. The metre, a spondee, a dactyl and three trochees require Tagus to be taken for the river famous for its golden sand. The first syllable is long in the Greek word signifying commander, otherwise an excellent rendering.

5. If the writer wished to allude to Bacon’s reference to himself as a “concealed poet,” the phrase, reconditarum et gemma pretiosa literarum, answers the purpose very well. “Recondite literature” will do too.

1 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

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Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

 

Hi A Phoenix

"The precious gem of concealed literature"  - a phrase both revealing and provocative.

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