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The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument


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Hi Yann,

The letters CRC stand for Christian Rosenkreutz/Rosencreutz the mythical founder of the Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross. The letters CRC in the Orbis/Circle fall within the name and title of Francis Bacon conveying the cryptic message Francis Bacon Founding Father of the Blessed Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross or Rosicrucian Brotherhood. 

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Hi A Phoenix,

Sorry if I am off topic, but I have just found something that I had to share with you, and I did not found a better place !

I wondered if there had been the same kind of Eulogies written for the death of Edward de Vere.

That is how I came across the following essay :

"Why Was Edward de Vere Defamed on Stage - and His Death Unnoticed ?" by Katherine Chiljan

https://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/wp-content/uploads/TOX21_Chiljan_Death_Unnoticed.pdf

I read the first pages and learned about "Love's Martyr" by Robert Chester published in 1601.

Katherine Chiljan mentioned a anonymous poem and something immediatly caught my eyes.

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/194/mode/2up

This 1878 Edition seems to be a facsimile but, strangely the pagination is not the same as the original book.

Moreover, there are two paginations.

Book page image

Here is the page 177 (WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE simple cipher)

And here is the second one 🙂 ...

image.png.17a2ee9c83d6796b6c113b8aadb96fbc.png

I like the fact that the first line of THRENOS begins with a B and the last line with a F.

And here is the anonymous poem, right after a poem by Ben Jonson ...

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/194/mode/2up

image.png.c8ebf9774c86cb352b9ba52913dd8ccd.png

There are 44 words.

I already told you that 44 was, in Hebrew, the gematria of yeled (Child), dam (Blood) and chol (Phoenix) and that for me the number 44 could hide "The Child with the Blood of the Phoenix".

44 is also the simple cipher of LIBER (Bacchus / Bacco / The Free one) and REX.

The 33rd word by counting from "The Phoenix Analysde" is ...  Creature. (a reference to Sonnet 1)

Notice the two words in Italic in the first Strophe Fable and Bird.

Interestingly, the sum of the value of all the uppercase letters in Italic is 77, the simple cipher of MINERVA.

And here is the cherry on the cake ! 😊

Did you notice the other uppercase letters ?

image.png.934cb1ca00751e48273f5f996af944c1.png

Prove of F BACON - W TIDOR

We know that TIDOR is one possible spelling of TUDOR/TUDUR/TIDDER/TWDWR

W. TIDOR = 84 = ELIZABETH (Simple cipher)

image.png.9f925e49edc28c3fae664eabb85ff937.png

😊

The page 33 ofthe Book is also very interesting ...

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/40/mode/2up

And Rob, this one is for you !

I think that I have just found your future prefered page 103/111.😉

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/110/mode/2up

 

image.png.6675e46fd1bdbec4bd706e71f60ea0b6.png

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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57 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi A Phoenix,

Sorry if I am off topic, but I have just found something that I had to share with you, and I did not found a better place !

I wondered if there had been the same kind of Eulogies written for the death of Edward de Vere.

That is how I came across the following essay :

"Why Was Edward de Vere Defamed on Stage - and His Death Unnoticed ?" by Katherine Chiljan

https://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/wp-content/uploads/TOX21_Chiljan_Death_Unnoticed.pdf

I read the first pages and learned about "Love's Martyr" by Robert Chester published in 1601.

Katherine Chiljan mentioned a anonymous poem and something immediatly caught my eyes.

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/194/mode/2up

This 1878 Edition seems to be a facsimile but, strangely the pagination is not the same as the original book.

Moreover, there are two paginations.

Book page image

Here is the page 177 (WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE simple cipher)

And here is the second one 🙂 ...

image.png.17a2ee9c83d6796b6c113b8aadb96fbc.png

I like the fact that the first line of THRENOS begins with a B and the last line with a F.

And here is the anonymous poem, right after a poem by Ben Jonson ...

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/194/mode/2up

image.png.c8ebf9774c86cb352b9ba52913dd8ccd.png

There are 44 words.

I already told you that 44 was, in Hebrew, the gematria of yeled (Child), dam (Blood) and chol (Phoenix) and that for me the number 44 could hide "The Child with the Blood of the Phoenix".

44 is also the simple cipher of LIBER (Bacchus / Bacco / The Free one) and REX.

The 33rd word by counting from "The Phoenix Analysde" is ...  Creature. (a reference to Sonnet 1)

Notice the two words in Italic in the first Strophe Fable and Bird.

Interestingly, the sum of the value of all the uppercase letters in Italic is 77, the simple cipher of MINERVA.

And here is the cherry on the cake ! 😊

Did you notice the other uppercase letters ?

image.png.934cb1ca00751e48273f5f996af944c1.png

Prove of F BACON - W TIDOR

We know that TIDOR is one possible spelling of TUDOR/TUDUR/TIDDER/TWDWR

W. TIDOR = 84 = ELIZABETH (Simple cipher)

image.png.9f925e49edc28c3fae664eabb85ff937.png

😊

The page 33 ofthe Book is also very interesting ...

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/40/mode/2up

And Rob, this one is for you !

I think that I have just found your future prefered page 103/111.😉

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/110/mode/2up

 

image.png.6675e46fd1bdbec4bd706e71f60ea0b6.png

There should be a 'prize' awarded by Light-of-Truth for the post of the week. I vote for this one.

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

And Rob, this one is for you !

I think that I have just found your future prefered page 103/111.😉

https://archive.org/details/robertchesterslo00ches/page/110/mode/2up

InDeed! Thank you, Yann!

I'll go to sleep on these two pages with Diamonds in my eyes.

image.png.df63126ea2958de7a8b8fb4710c1d7e9.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
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O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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QUEEN ELIZABETH, THE PREGNANCY PORTRAIT & THE CONCEALED ROYAL BIRTH OF FRANCIS BACON

The figure of Queen Elizabeth in her Persian robe is standing beneath a walnut tree, known as a Persian walnut which in Elizabethan times was referred to as a Royal tree. The Royal walnut tree is a symbol of knowledge and wisdom (the subjects of Bacon’s Advancement of Learning and Wisdom of the Ancients). On the branches of the tree Strong points out that at the top to the right there are two small birds with peachy pink breasts, namely chaffinches which David Shakespeare thinks may signify two young men.1 With photographic enhancement David Shakespeare also identified a songbird perched on a branch, signifying a songbird in a sole Arabian tree, that is of some very special importance. In 1601 (for some about the date of the portrait) a long allegorical poem was set forth by a little known Robert Chester entitled Loves Martyr, with a collection of shorter poems by other poets, including the Shakespeare poem known as The Phoenix and Turtle:2

                                       Let the bird of loudest lay

                                       On the sole Arabian tree

                                       Herald sad and trumpet be,

                                       To whose sound chaste wings obey. 

                                                  [Lines 1-4]

The 67 line (67=Francis in simple cipher) allegorical Shakespeare poem tells the story of a mystical love between two birds-the turtle a symbol of fidelity and the mythical phoenix emblem of immortality. The poem mourns the death of the phoenix and turtle and its theme of the mutual flame explores the complexity of the mystical union of the two dead birds. It is the most obscure of the Shakespeare poems and as Hackett argues it ‘incites deciphering’ with many attempting to decode the allegory via references to historical figures.3 The phoenix is usually interpreted to represent Queen Elizabeth and numerous scholars believe the poem obliquely alludes to the relationship between Elizabeth and her lover the Earl of Essex (he was not her lover but her concealed son), or if not to their relationship, to the events that lie behind the Essex rebellion and his execution in 1601. Or alternatively, the turtle may partly shadow Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom Queen Elizabeth had two sons. Some Shakespeare scholars have interpreted the child of the phoenix as a reference to Elizabeth’s heir James VI of Scotland, which of course, is clearly problematic (and wrong), as she was alive in 1601. In the poem the phoenix simultaneously represents Queen Elizabeth, as well as her heir and successor. And in the Threnos its author Bacon laments that she leaves no open posterity, meaning himself her concealed child, and unacknowledged heir to the throne of England: 

                                          Beauty, truth, and rarity,

                                          Grace in all simplicity,

                                          Here enclosed in cinders lie.

                                  

                                          Death is now the phoenix’ nest,

                                          And the turtle’s loyal breast

                                          To eternity does rest.

 

                                          Leaving no posterity

                                          ‘Twas not their infirmity,

                                          It was married chastity.

                                                 [Lines 53-61]

 

1. Roy Strong, ‘“My Weepinge Stagg I Crowne”: The Persian Lady Reconsidered’ In The Art of The Emblem, eds., Michael Bath, John Manning and Alan R. Young (New York: AMS Press, Inc, 1993), p. 115; David Shakespeare, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I’, (First edition May, 2018, online), p. 87.

2. David Shakespeare, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I’, (First edition May, 2018, online), pp. 38-40.

3. Helen Hackett, Shakespeare and Elizabeth: The Meeting Of Two Myths (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009), p. 137.

 

QE.jpg

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QUEEN ELIZABETH, THE PREGNANCY PORTRAIT & THE CONCEALED ROYAL BIRTH OF FRANCIS BACON

In the climax to the closing scene of his Shakespeare play Henry VIII Bacon puts in the mouth of Cranmer a great speech in which he prophesizes that the baby Princess Elizabeth, although described as a ‘maiden phoenix’ shall leave behind her a son and heir. The speech doubles as a veiled record of the state secret that the so-called Virgin Queen carried a royal child, as conveyed in the Pregnancy Portrait at Hampton Court, and gave birth to a concealed heir, Bacon-Shakespeare, ‘as great in fame as she was’:

 

                            For heavens now bids me, and the words I utter    

                            Let none think flattery, for they’ll find ‘em truth.

                            This royal infant-heaven still move about her-

                            Though in her cradle, yet now promises

                            Upon this land a thousand thousand blessings

                            Which time shall bring to ripeness. She shall be-

                            But few now living can behold that goodness-

 .                          A pattern to all princes living with her,

                            And all that should succeed. Saba was never

                            More covetous of wisdom and fair virtue

                            Than this pure soul shall be. All princely graces

                            That mould up such a mighty piece as this is,

                            With all virtues that attend the good,

                            Shall still be doubled on her. Truth shall nurse her,

                            Holy and heavenly thoughts still counsel her.

                            She shall be loved and feared. Her own shall bless her;

                            Her foes shake like a field of beaten corn,

                            And hang their heads with sorrow. Good grows with her.

                            In her days every man shall eat in safety

                            Under his own vine what he plants, and sing

                            The merry songs of peace to all his neighbours.

                            God shall be truly known, and those about her

                            From her shall read the perfect ways of honour,

                            And by those claim their greatness, not by blood.

                            Nor shall this peace sleep with her, but, as when

                            The bird of wonder dies- the maiden phoenix-

                            Her ashes new create another heir,

                            As great in admiration as herself;

                            So shall she leave her blessedness to one,

                            When heaven shall call her from this cloud of darkness,

                            Who from the sacred ashes of her honour

                            Shall star-like rise as great in fame as she was,

                            And so stand fixed: Peace, plenty, love, truth, terror,

                            That were the servants to this chosen infant,

                            Shall then be his, and like a vine, grow to him.

                            Wherever the bright sun of heaven shall shine,

                            His honour and the greatness of his name

                            Shall be, and make new nations. He shall flourish,

                            And, like a mountain cedar reach his branches

                            To all the plains about him. Our children’s children

                            Shall see this, and bless heaven...

                                            [Henry VIII: 5:4:15-55]

The most important of these new nations was the founding by Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood of what became the United States of America, the most powerful democracy in the history of the world. When the sleepy and ignorant modern mind finally wakes up to the greatness of Bacon and his Universal Reformation of the World and the enormous debt we owe him, the fame and greatness of his name will spread to every corner of the globe. His incomparable achievements when known will truly stagger humankind, and when we all see it, we will bless heaven that one such as him, this divine demi-god, ever walked among us.  

 

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5 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

QUEEN ELIZABETH, THE PREGNANCY PORTRAIT & THE CONCEALED ROYAL BIRTH OF FRANCIS BACON

The figure of Queen Elizabeth in her Persian robe is standing beneath a walnut tree, known as a Persian walnut which in Elizabethan times was referred to as a Royal tree. The Royal walnut tree is a symbol of knowledge and wisdom (the subjects of Bacon’s Advancement of Learning and Wisdom of the Ancients). On the branches of the tree Strong points out that at the top to the right there are two small birds with peachy pink breasts, namely chaffinches which David Shakespeare thinks may signify two young men.1 With photographic enhancement David Shakespeare also identified a songbird perched on a branch, signifying a songbird in a sole Arabian tree, that is of some very special importance. In 1601 (for some about the date of the portrait) a long allegorical poem was set forth by a little known Robert Chester entitled Loves Martyr, with a collection of shorter poems by other poets, including the Shakespeare poem known as The Phoenix and Turtle:2

                                       Let the bird of loudest lay

                                       On the sole Arabian tree

                                       Herald sad and trumpet be,

                                       To whose sound chaste wings obey. 

                                                  [Lines 1-4]

The 67 line (67=Francis in simple cipher) allegorical Shakespeare poem tells the story of a mystical love between two birds-the turtle a symbol of fidelity and the mythical phoenix emblem of immortality. The poem mourns the death of the phoenix and turtle and its theme of the mutual flame explores the complexity of the mystical union of the two dead birds. It is the most obscure of the Shakespeare poems and as Hackett argues it ‘incites deciphering’ with many attempting to decode the allegory via references to historical figures.3 The phoenix is usually interpreted to represent Queen Elizabeth and numerous scholars believe the poem obliquely alludes to the relationship between Elizabeth and her lover the Earl of Essex (he was not her lover but her concealed son), or if not to their relationship, to the events that lie behind the Essex rebellion and his execution in 1601. Or alternatively, the turtle may partly shadow Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom Queen Elizabeth had two sons. Some Shakespeare scholars have interpreted the child of the phoenix as a reference to Elizabeth’s heir James VI of Scotland, which of course, is clearly problematic (and wrong), as she was alive in 1601. In the poem the phoenix simultaneously represents Queen Elizabeth, as well as her heir and successor. And in the Threnos its author Bacon laments that she leaves no open posterity, meaning himself her concealed child, and unacknowledged heir to the throne of England: 

                                          Beauty, truth, and rarity,

                                          Grace in all simplicity,

                                          Here enclosed in cinders lie.

                                  

                                          Death is now the phoenix’ nest,

                                          And the turtle’s loyal breast

                                          To eternity does rest.

 

                                          Leaving no posterity

                                          ‘Twas not their infirmity,

                                          It was married chastity.

                                                 [Lines 53-61]

 

1. Roy Strong, ‘“My Weepinge Stagg I Crowne”: The Persian Lady Reconsidered’ In The Art of The Emblem, eds., Michael Bath, John Manning and Alan R. Young (New York: AMS Press, Inc, 1993), p. 115; David Shakespeare, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I’, (First edition May, 2018, online), p. 87.

2. David Shakespeare, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I’, (First edition May, 2018, online), pp. 38-40.

3. Helen Hackett, Shakespeare and Elizabeth: The Meeting Of Two Myths (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009), p. 137.

 

QE.jpg

The Royal Collection Trust are still insisting that this is a portrait of "an unknown woman".

https://www.rct.uk/collection/406024/portrait-of-an-unknown-woman

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