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The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument


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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

                                               TRANSLATION TWO

                                   Who passes yonder? his is not a face

                                   Of every day. You know not him? then hear.

                                   The Prince of Theories, the High Priest of Truth,

                                   Lord of Induction, and of Verulam,

                                   Master of the Universe, but not of Arts;

                                   The Pine-tree of Profundity and Grace;

                                   Nature’s particular Augur, Chronicle

                                   Of Science, Courier of Experiment;

                                   Equity’s standard-bearer; he that found

                                   Poor Science chained from undergraduate hope,

                                   And set her free; Promus of Light; that drove

                                   Before him all our Phantoms and our Clouds;

                                   Colleague o’ the Sun; and Square of Certitude;

                                   The Sophist’s scourge; the literary Brutus,

                                   Ending the tyrannies of Authority;

                                   Of Thought and Sense stupendous Arbiter,

                                   The Reason’s whetstone; of Physics very Atlas,

                                   To whom the Stagirite bowed his giant strength;

                                   A Noah’s Dove, who in old age perceiving

                                   No place nor rest for’s Art, chose for himself

                                   Thus to return to his maternal Ark.

                                   The text of Subtilty, the child of Time,

                                   His mother Truth; the Hive of honey’d Wit;

                                   Of earth and life the only Hierophant;

                                   The axe of Error: grain of mustard-seed,

                                   Bitter to others, growing to itself-

                                   But my wit droops. Aid me, Posterity!

[Edmund Blunden, Essays and Studies by Members of the English Association, 19 (1934), pp.

35-36]

 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

EPICEDIA

MANES

VERVLAMIANI

SIVE

IN OBITUM

INCOMPARABILIS

FRANCISCI

DE VERVLAMIO, &c.

EPICEDIA.

INCLYTA Academia CANTABRIGIENSIS, cujus felicitas fuit, viro ad salutem scientiarum nato, primas sapientiae mammas prebere; ac Philosophum, post occasum Graeciae, maximum, orbi dare: super funus Alumni sui Lacrymas  effudit, doctas as duraturas maestitias.  Ex hoc integro Musarum fonte, modica haec sed facunda fluenta, collegit interpres; ut quod, viventi, seculum dederat decus, gliscente adhuc invidia; & morienti dedisse constaret, cessante nunc adulatione Reliqua sui nominis aeternitati consecranda, continuata seculorum serie ad ultimas usq; mundi favillas,rependet posteritas: Quis supremam suis laudibus manum imponet, novit tantum, Fundator ille, ac simul eversor Seculorum.

TRANSLATION

The Shades of Verulam or Funeral Chants at the Death of the Incomparable Francis of Verulam. The famous University of Cambridge, whose felicity it was to be the first to offer the breasts of Wisdom to the man born to be the saviour of the Sciences, and to give to the world the greatest philosopher since the fall of Greece, pours forth her tears over the burial of her foster child, songs of grief both learned and everlasting. From this fresh fount of the Muses the interpreter has collected these short but easy-flowing verses, in order that honour which his age had given him, albeit with growing envy, during his life, and that which, now the flattery has ceased, it was meet should be given him when dead-that is the remains of his name as dedicated to eternity-might be requited by posterity through successive centuries even unto the uttermost ashes of the world. Who will be the last to put his hand to these praises, only he knows who is at once the founder and demolisher of the centuries.

[W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 54 wherein he observes: ‘From its general style and from its similarity, especially of its conclusion, to the introduction to the Manes, signed by Dr. William Rawley, it is probably safe to assume that it is his too.’]

CONCLUSION

ORdine sequeretur descriptio Tumuli VERULAMIANI, monumentum Nobiliss. MUTISII, in honorem domini sui constructum; qua pietate, & dignitatem Patroni sui, quem (quod rari faciunt, etiam post cineres Coluit) consuluit; Patriae suae opprobrium diluit; sibi nomen condidit. Busta haec nondum invisit Interpres, sed invisurus: Interim Lector tua cura Commoda, & abi in rem tuam.

Crescit occulto velut Arbor aevo

Fama BACONIS.*

[* ‘Baconis’ appears in the first issue of the 1640 edition (Gibson, no. 141a). ‘Baconi’ appears in later issues of the same year (Gibson, no. 141b and no. 141c) and also in the 1674 edition (Gibson, no. 142)]

TRANSLATION

In proper order would follow a description of the tomb of Verulam, the monument of the most noble Meautys, constructed in honour of his Lord, by which act of piety (dutiful regard) he at once fittingly celebrated the dignity of his patron, whom after the fashion of but few, he honoured even after death. He thus wiped away the contumely of his country, and built a name for himself. These tombs have not yet been inspected, but an Interpreter will come. Meanwhile, reader, make thine own arrangements and go about thy business.

                                                         Spreads like a tree in hidden growth The fame of Bacon.

 

[W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), pp. 30- 31]

 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

...These tombs have not yet been inspected, but an Interpreter will come. Meanwhile, reader, make thine own arrangements and go about thy business.

                                                         Spreads like a tree in hidden growth The fame of Bacon.

Curious statement. 🙂

 

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

EPICEDIA

MANES

VERVLAMIANI

SIVE

IN OBITUM

INCOMPARABILIS

FRANCISCI

DE VERVLAMIO, &c.

EPICEDIA.

INCLYTA Academia CANTABRIGIENSIS, cujus felicitas fuit, viro ad salutem scientiarum nato, primas sapientiae mammas prebere; ac Philosophum, post occasum Graeciae, maximum, orbi dare: super funus Alumni sui Lacrymas  effudit, doctas as duraturas maestitias.  Ex hoc integro Musarum fonte, modica haec sed facunda fluenta, collegit interpres; ut quod, viventi, seculum dederat decus, gliscente adhuc invidia; & morienti dedisse constaret, cessante nunc adulatione Reliqua sui nominis aeternitati consecranda, continuata seculorum serie ad ultimas usq; mundi favillas,rependet posteritas: Quis supremam suis laudibus manum imponet, novit tantum, Fundator ille, ac simul eversor Seculorum.

TRANSLATION

The Shades of Verulam or Funeral Chants at the Death of the Incomparable Francis of Verulam. The famous University of Cambridge, whose felicity it was to be the first to offer the breasts of Wisdom to the man born to be the saviour of the Sciences, and to give to the world the greatest philosopher since the fall of Greece, pours forth her tears over the burial of her foster child, songs of grief both learned and everlasting. From this fresh fount of the Muses the interpreter has collected these short but easy-flowing verses, in order that honour which his age had given him, albeit with growing envy, during his life, and that which, now the flattery has ceased, it was meet should be given him when dead-that is the remains of his name as dedicated to eternity-might be requited by posterity through successive centuries even unto the uttermost ashes of the world. Who will be the last to put his hand to these praises, only he knows who is at once the founder and demolisher of the centuries.

[W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), p. 54 wherein he observes: ‘From its general style and from its similarity, especially of its conclusion, to the introduction to the Manes, signed by Dr. William Rawley, it is probably safe to assume that it is his too.’]

CONCLUSION

ORdine sequeretur descriptio Tumuli VERULAMIANI, monumentum Nobiliss. MUTISII, in honorem domini sui constructum; qua pietate, & dignitatem Patroni sui, quem (quod rari faciunt, etiam post cineres Coluit) consuluit; Patriae suae opprobrium diluit; sibi nomen condidit. Busta haec nondum invisit Interpres, sed invisurus: Interim Lector tua cura Commoda, & abi in rem tuam.

Crescit occulto velut Arbor aevo

Fama BACONIS.*

[* ‘Baconis’ appears in the first issue of the 1640 edition (Gibson, no. 141a). ‘Baconi’ appears in later issues of the same year (Gibson, no. 141b and no. 141c) and also in the 1674 edition (Gibson, no. 142)]

TRANSLATION

In proper order would follow a description of the tomb of Verulam, the monument of the most noble Meautys, constructed in honour of his Lord, by which act of piety (dutiful regard) he at once fittingly celebrated the dignity of his patron, whom after the fashion of but few, he honoured even after death. He thus wiped away the contumely of his country, and built a name for himself. These tombs have not yet been inspected, but an Interpreter will come. Meanwhile, reader, make thine own arrangements and go about thy business.

                                                         Spreads like a tree in hidden growth The fame of Bacon.

 

[W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950), pp. 30- 31]

 Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Hi A Phoenix

You show us the rarest of reflections on the life of Lord Bacon by those who knew him. Thank you.

 

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4 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi A Phoenix

You show us the rarest of reflections on the life of Lord Bacon by those who knew him. Thank you.

 

Why are they so rare?

Because they have been suppressed for almost 400 years. 😉

Yes, these may be rare, but not nearly as rare as any eulogies to the uneducated buffoon who the Stratfordians try to maintain as their candidate!

Am I mistaken in thinking nobody said a word about Willy Shakspur after he died until 7 years later in the First Folio, with Bacon's good friend Ben speaking the loudest hinting at Bacon?

These contemporary eulogies written for Bacon are some of the most convincing evidence that Bacon was Shakespeare ever produced. Thank you A. Phoenix for presenting the Latin and several translations for the world to study and enjoy.

🙂

 

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

1730. Francisci Baconi Baronis de Verulamio, Vicecomitis Sancti Albani, Magni Angliae Cancellarii, Opera Omnia, Quatuor Voluminibus (The Works of Bacon in four volumes) edited by John Blackbourne (London: printed by R. Gosling Fleet-street, 1730), I, pp. 195-218: All thirty-two verses are reproduced in the ‘Characters of Lord Bacon’ section which begins on page 195. The characters written in English are from the following: John Evelyn, Ben Jonson, Peter Heylin, Francis Osborn, Thomas Sprat, Abraham Cowley, Duke of Buckingham, Joseph Addison in the Tatler and Spectator, a passage in Greek in the possession of J. Locker. A Latin passage by Boroughs on Philippus Baconus. There follows five Latin verses, the first by John Boroughs: ‘Ad D. Franciscum Baconum Atturnatum Regis, Strena’, followed by three George Herbert Latin verses: ‘In Auctorem Instaurationis’, ‘In Honorem Illustrissimi Dni Francisci De Verulamio Vice-Comitis Sti Albani Post Editam Ab Eo Instaur. Mag’, 'Comparatio Cancellariatus & Libri’, and another Latin verse by John Boroughs: ‘Viro omni laude majori Francisco Bacono, Patrono mihi unice observando’. These verses all precede the Memoriae verses. Immediately following Memoriae verses is a passage from a manuscript belonging to the reverend Thomas Baker B.D. This short passage mostly in Latin refers to Anthony, Francis and Nicholas Bacon and their time at Cambridge University and contains further information concerning Dr Rawley who was also at Cambridge. Thomas Baker was an antiquarian writer and left complete manuscripts relating to the history of Cambridge. The Memoriae verses are reproduced under their original title but with the page headline Manes Verulamiani. They are printed from the Latin 1626 original text and commence on page 204.

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

JOHN BOROUGHS’S STRENA, p. 201. Apart from the above work the Strena appears in John Borough, Impetus Juveniles (Oxford: Excudebat Leonardus Lichfield, Academia Typographus, 1643), pp. 75-77. The Strena is also reproduced in 1660 edition of the same work (pp. 75-77):

                          Ad D. FRANCISCUM BACONUM Atturnatum Regis, Strena.

                                  AUDI renascens tempus: audito impiger

                                  Vorator anne: nec tibi favens pater,

                                  Natis nec ex te; at saevus usque incondita

                                  Ipsi tibi sepulchra, saxa, nomina,

                                  Famamque teque volvis, & perdis simul.

                                  Audi sacrum solenne, tempus insolens,

                                  Vates, quod illi, illi patrono publico,

                                  Meoque solvo: qui supra, infra se videns,

                                  Mundumque teque mille gyris labilem,

                                  Mutantium rotantiumque insanias;

                                  Sibi interim suisque constans, exhibet

                                  Firmamen ingens saeculo: cui post vagos

                                  Trepidantium motus, redire pondera,

                                  Curasque patriae necessitas jubet;

                                  Et coget usus publicus, quicquid tenax

                                  Lucri cupido, & livor in tempus negant.

                                  Huic me columnae perpetis constantiae

                                  Addico, voto perpeti, etiam quod tui

                                  (Tyranne tempus) nulla vis mutaverit;

                                  Saevis licet furisque. Nam dictum hoc puta:

                                  Mutare me nequis, potes me perdere.

                                                                                          BURRHUS.

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

TRANSLATION TO SIR FRANCIS BACON, ATTORNEY TO THE KING.- Strena.

Listen, you new-born Time. Devouring Age attend. Neither the Father favours thee, nor the Son born of thee-cruelly dost thou hide thyself in an obscure stony tomb, losing together both thy name and fame. Give Ear, O Solemn Religion, insolent Time, to vows which I, as a prophet, pay to him, Patron of the public, and my own. He, seeing thee above, the world beneath him, tottering and reeling with a thousand turns, seeing vicissitudes, continual change of follies, whilst still constant himself, he offered to our Age a mighty prop; he was one called by necessity to readjust the balance, after these wandering, whirling, motions, and with a care for all the country’s weal. ’Twas he compelled the due administration of justice, public business, a practice formerly denied by malice, avarice. By an eternal vow, I thereby dedicate myself to this perpetual pillar -Constancy-the which, O Tyrant Time, howe’er thou storm and rage, shall ne’er be changed by thy destructive fury. Nor is this saying nothing more than words:-“You cannot change me though you ruin me.” BURRHUS.

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

The obscure passage at the beginning of this piece seems to mean that no thanks were due, either to the learning of the past century (the Father), nor the present century (the Son), for the New Philosophy and Literature everywhere springing up. This was Francis Bacon’s own “Child,” “the Heir of his Invention,” the “New Birth of Time,” the Second Revival of Learning to which he devoted his whole life and strength, “Constant as the Polar Star,” “Constant to his purposes,” unchanged even in ruin. The headline assures us that these lines were written long before Bacon’s death-if even his death did take place at the date assigned, namely, 1626. The present writer has found strong reasons for doubting the correctness of this date. In 1626 Francis Bacon died to the world. Had he truly died, where is any register of his death and burial? Where was he buried? Who saw him die? Who attended his funeral? With so many friends to write his elegies, was there not one to record his latest words, or to describe the place and circumstances of his burial, however quiet and private it may have been? It seems certain that he was not buried at St. Michael’s Church, St. Alban’s, either in the vaults beneath, or (unless cremated) in the monument. Surely this is a matter which should be thoroughly inquired. In a certain circle the facts are doubtless perfectly well known; but since we, the “profane vulgar,” are carefully excluded from the chief portal of knowledge, we must mine the foundations, scale the walls, or enter by any back way which we may be able to discover for ourselves. It may, perhaps, afford some clue or hint to other searchers, if we state the opinion (not a fixed belief) that Francis Bacon must have lived beyond the year 1640, perhaps no longer than 1641. The latter date would make him eighty at the time of his death, and this would give point to the comparison of him to Nestor, and also to the otherwise rather unmeaning line (at the beginning of an Elegy published in a previous number of this Magazine):- “If any man doubt that thou hast numbered eighty Decembers,” etc. The poet seems to hint at the dullness or ignorance of him who doubts that the great Bacon was venerable and aged as Nestor. The author of this “Strena” was a Sir John Burroughs, a clever, remarkable personage, of whom we shall have something to say if space is allowed in future numbers for chapters on the writers of the Elegies, and on the friends and collaborators of Francis Bacon. When books by him were published, or made to pass for his, Burroughs latinised his own name into Burrhus, as signed in this instance. He died at Oxford in 1643, in which year his name first appeared as an Author. This, as we see, was many years subsequent to the writing of the present lament. The book in question, “Impetus Juveniles,” consists chiefly of Epistles addressed to Sir Francis Bacon, and to several of his friends,-Sir Thomas Farnaby, Sir Henry Spelman (and others), into whose private history it would be well to make close inquiries. [‘“Manes Verulamiani”’, Baconiana, Vol. VI, New Series, No. 21, January 1898, pp. 34-36. There is a note by the translators to explain that due to space and time ‘No attempt has therefore been made to versify the lines, which are translated almost literally.’]

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

1730. Francisci Baconi Baronis de Verulamio, Vicecomitis Sancti Albani, Magni Angliae Cancellarii, Opera Omnia, Quatuor Voluminibus (The Works of Bacon in four volumes) edited by John Blackbourne (London: printed by R. Gosling Fleet-street, 1730), I, pp. 195-218: All thirty-two verses are reproduced in the ‘Characters of Lord Bacon’ section which begins on page 195. The characters written in English are from the following: John Evelyn, Ben Jonson, Peter Heylin, Francis Osborn, Thomas Sprat, Abraham Cowley, Duke of Buckingham, Joseph Addison in the Tatler and Spectator, a passage in Greek in the possession of J. Locker. A Latin passage by Boroughs on Philippus Baconus. There follows five Latin verses, the first by John Boroughs: ‘Ad D. Franciscum Baconum Atturnatum Regis, Strena’, followed by three George Herbert Latin verses: ‘In Auctorem Instaurationis’, ‘In Honorem Illustrissimi Dni Francisci De Verulamio Vice-Comitis Sti Albani Post Editam Ab Eo Instaur. Mag’, 'Comparatio Cancellariatus & Libri’, and another Latin verse by John Boroughs: ‘Viro omni laude majori Francisco Bacono, Patrono mihi unice observando’. These verses all precede the Memoriae verses. Immediately following Memoriae verses is a passage from a manuscript belonging to the reverend Thomas Baker B.D. This short passage mostly in Latin refers to Anthony, Francis and Nicholas Bacon and their time at Cambridge University and contains further information concerning Dr Rawley who was also at Cambridge. Thomas Baker was an antiquarian writer and left complete manuscripts relating to the history of Cambridge. The Memoriae verses are reproduced under their original title but with the page headline Manes Verulamiani. They are printed from the Latin 1626 original text and commence on page 204.

 

Hi A Phoenix

Not directly related to the Manes Verulamiani, I found links to Vols. 1 & 2 of a book you referenced nearly 2 years ago:

https://wellcomecollection.org/works/ykjh8yvv/items

Memoirs of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, from the year 1581 till her death. In which the secret intrigues of her court, and the conduct of her favourite, Robert Earl of Essex, both at home and abroad, are particularly illustrated. From the original papers of ... Anthony Bacon, esquire, and other manuscripts never before published / By Thomas Birch.

I will start a new thread so as not to digress from the Memorials, but can't resist posting this short letter from Robert Devereux to Lord Buckhurst about Francis Bacon's prospects at court.

ScreenShot2024-03-19at10_43_34pm.png.f047b44356dd237535998f2a856338c9.png

Edited by Eric Roberts
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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

The obscure passage at the beginning of this piece seems to mean that no thanks were due, either to the learning of the past century (the Father), nor the present century (the Son), for the New Philosophy and Literature everywhere springing up. This was Francis Bacon’s own “Child,” “the Heir of his Invention,” the “New Birth of Time,” the Second Revival of Learning to which he devoted his whole life and strength, “Constant as the Polar Star,” “Constant to his purposes,” unchanged even in ruin. The headline assures us that these lines were written long before Bacon’s death-if even his death did take place at the date assigned, namely, 1626. The present writer has found strong reasons for doubting the correctness of this date. In 1626 Francis Bacon died to the world. Had he truly died, where is any register of his death and burial? Where was he buried? Who saw him die? Who attended his funeral? With so many friends to write his elegies, was there not one to record his latest words, or to describe the place and circumstances of his burial, however quiet and private it may have been? It seems certain that he was not buried at St. Michael’s Church, St. Alban’s, either in the vaults beneath, or (unless cremated) in the monument. Surely this is a matter which should be thoroughly inquired. In a certain circle the facts are doubtless perfectly well known; but since we, the “profane vulgar,” are carefully excluded from the chief portal of knowledge, we must mine the foundations, scale the walls, or enter by any back way which we may be able to discover for ourselves. It may, perhaps, afford some clue or hint to other searchers, if we state the opinion (not a fixed belief) that Francis Bacon must have lived beyond the year 1640, perhaps no longer than 1641. The latter date would make him eighty at the time of his death, and this would give point to the comparison of him to Nestor, and also to the otherwise rather unmeaning line (at the beginning of an Elegy published in a previous number of this Magazine):- “If any man doubt that thou hast numbered eighty Decembers,” etc. The poet seems to hint at the dullness or ignorance of him who doubts that the great Bacon was venerable and aged as Nestor. The author of this “Strena” was a Sir John Burroughs, a clever, remarkable personage, of whom we shall have something to say if space is allowed in future numbers for chapters on the writers of the Elegies, and on the friends and collaborators of Francis Bacon. When books by him were published, or made to pass for his, Burroughs latinised his own name into Burrhus, as signed in this instance. He died at Oxford in 1643, in which year his name first appeared as an Author. This, as we see, was many years subsequent to the writing of the present lament. The book in question, “Impetus Juveniles,” consists chiefly of Epistles addressed to Sir Francis Bacon, and to several of his friends,-Sir Thomas Farnaby, Sir Henry Spelman (and others), into whose private history it would be well to make close inquiries. [‘“Manes Verulamiani”’, Baconiana, Vol. VI, New Series, No. 21, January 1898, pp. 34-36. There is a note by the translators to explain that due to space and time ‘No attempt has therefore been made to versify the lines, which are translated almost literally.’]

 

https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Dictionary_of_National_Biography,_1885-1900/Borough,_John_(d.1643)

 

 

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

GEORGE HERBERT’S VERSE NUMBER 1, pp. 201-02, ‘In Auctorem Instaurationis’ sometimes titled ‘Ad Auctorem Instaurationis Magnae’. The verse also appears in George Herbert, Remains (London: printed for Timothy Garthwait, 1652), pp. 181-82; John Vivian, Ecclesiastes Solomonis (Londini: Typis J. F. prostant venales apud Octavian. Pulleyn juniorem  sub signo Bibliorum juxta ostiolum Borealem D. Paul, 1664), p. 29; William Rawley, Opscula Varia Posthuma, Philosophica, Civilia, Et Theologica, Francisci Baconi, Baronis de Verulamio Vice-Comitis Albani (Londoni: Ex Officina R. Danielis, 1658), prefatory pages unnumbered (for the same see also the 1663 Amsterdam edition): Bodl. MS. Rawlinson Poet. 246 (R):

                                               

                                           In Auctorem Instaurationis.

                                  PER strages licet Auctorum, veterumque ruinas,

                                      Ad famae properes vera trophaea tuae;

                                  Tam nitide tamen occidis, tam suaviter, hostes,

                                      Se quasi donatum funere quisque putet.

                                  Scilicet apponit pretium tua dextera fato;

                                       Vulnereque emanat sanguis, ut intret honos.

                                  O quam felices sunt qui tua castra sequuntur,

                                     Cum per te sit res ambitiosa mori!

 

                                                    TRANSLATION

                                         To The Author of the Instauration.

Through the destruction and ruin of the old Authors must thou speedily erect the trophies of

thine own fame, cut down a sacrifice almost offered which one may think ill-omened. Surely

thy right hand bestows value on the oracle, and blood issues from the wound, so that honour

may enter. O, how happy are they who can follow thy camp! By thy example (we learn) that it is good to

die.

      [‘“Manes Verulamiani”’, Baconiana, Vol. VI, New Series, No. 21, January 1898, p. 39] 

 

Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

GEORGE HERBERT’S VERSE NUMBER 3, p. 202 ‘Comparatio Cancellariatus & Libri’. Same verse also titled ‘Comparatio Inter Mundus Summi Cancel. et Librum’. It also appears in George Herbert, Remains (London: printed for Timothy Garthwait, 1652), pp. 181-82; John Vivian, Ecclesiastes Solomonis (Londini: Typis J. F. prostant venales apud Octavian. Pulleyn juniorem sub signo Bibliorum juxta ostiolum Borealem D. Paul, 1664), p. 30; William Rawley, ed., Opscula Varia Posthuma, Philosophica, Civilia, Et Theologica, Francisci Baconi, Baronis de Verulamio Vice-Comitis Albani (Londoni: Ex Officina R. Danielis, 1658), prefatory pages unnumbered (for the same see also the 1663 Amsterdam edition): Bodl. MS. Rawlinson Poet. 246 (R):

 

                                          Comparatio Cancellariatus & Libri.

                                     MUNERE dum prodes nobis, libroque futuris,

                                           In laudes abeunt saecula quaeque tuas.

                                     Munere dum nobis prodes, libroque remotis,

                                           In laudes abeunt jam loca quaeque tuas.

                                           Hae tibi sunt alae laudum: cui contigit unquam

                                               Longuis aeterno, latius orbe decus?

                                                                                    GEORGIUS HERBERTUS,

                                                                                        Orator Publicus Acad. Cant.

A translation has not been found for this verse.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

GEORGE HERBERT’S VERSE NUMBER 3, p. 202 ‘Comparatio Cancellariatus & Libri’. Same verse also titled ‘Comparatio Inter Mundus Summi Cancel. et Librum’. It also appears in George Herbert, Remains (London: printed for Timothy Garthwait, 1652), pp. 181-82; John Vivian, Ecclesiastes Solomonis (Londini: Typis J. F. prostant venales apud Octavian. Pulleyn juniorem sub signo Bibliorum juxta ostiolum Borealem D. Paul, 1664), p. 30; William Rawley, ed., Opscula Varia Posthuma, Philosophica, Civilia, Et Theologica, Francisci Baconi, Baronis de Verulamio Vice-Comitis Albani (Londoni: Ex Officina R. Danielis, 1658), prefatory pages unnumbered (for the same see also the 1663 Amsterdam edition): Bodl. MS. Rawlinson Poet. 246 (R):

 

                                          Comparatio Cancellariatus & Libri.

                                     MUNERE dum prodes nobis, libroque futuris,

                                           In laudes abeunt saecula quaeque tuas.

                                     Munere dum nobis prodes, libroque remotis,

                                           In laudes abeunt jam loca quaeque tuas.

                                           Hae tibi sunt alae laudum: cui contigit unquam

                                               Longuis aeterno, latius orbe decus?

                                                                                    GEORGIUS HERBERTUS,

                                                                                        Orator Publicus Acad. Cant.

A translation has not been found for this verse.

 

 

 

 

Never fear, Google is here...

 

ScreenShot2024-03-21at9_02_43pm.png.b8fa4b2b87161a094711ab2872e77fac.png

This is why humans are an unfortunate necessity.

It's all about the nuances.

 

 

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Comparison of Staionery & Books.
SERVE while you profit us, and the book to come,
All the ages go away in praise of you.

Sonnet 77 at the end of the end of the first half of the Sonnets and Day 182:

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Line1073

Looke what thy memorie cannot containe,
Commit to these waste blacks,and thou shalt finde
Those children nurst,deliuerd from thy braine,
To take a new acquaintance of thy minde.
These offices,so oft as thou wilt looke,
Shall profit thee,and much inrich thy booke.

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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OTHER RARE VERSES LINKED TO THE MEMORIAE

JOHN BOROUGH’S VERSE, pp. 202-204 ‘Viro Omni laude majori FRANCISCO BACONO ,Patrono Mihi Unice Observando’. The verse also appears in William Rawley, ed., Opscula Varia Posthuma, Philosophica, Civilia, Et Theologica, Francisci Baconi, Baronis de Verulamio Vice-Comitis Albani (Londoni: Ex Officina R. Danielis, 1658), prefatory pages unnumbered:

 

Viro omni laude majori FRANCISCO BACONO, Patrono mihi unice observando.

 ITA est, poetae, sors quibus nascentibus

Artes inanes absque re, lare & penu,

Indixit, & zonis modestis utier,

Haud consciis nummi loquacis tinnitus,

Mensaque pressa, carnis exili insula

Vasto mari juris natante; prodiga

Si tantulum gustare Bacchum siverit,

(Dum scilicet vivunt suo) quantum riget

Siccum parum, sed sobrium artis daemonem;

Hi nempe, condimenta qui vitae aucupant,

Et velitares qui artium pugnas cient,

Si quid receptant, illico versus canunt,

Et creditum putant satisfactum ampliter

Si facta ficta laude pensant carminis.

Hinc non inique dispares remur viros

Virtutibus, quos fusius sub incude

Cudit poesis, gnara verborum artifex.

Ast horum ego quid pertimescam? Sistite,

Audite, fastus, livor, assentatio;

Audite vos, merces malae: nam non pudet,

Vobis vel invitis, sacra haec persolvere.

BACONE, sidus literarum, mel merum,

Facundiae & legum decus, scientiae

Spiransque museum, paterna nobilis

Propage, propriae sed indolis magis

Virtute, quae haud est sortis arbitrariae:

Jam sospites vivant Britannorum licet

In posterum leges, solutae opprobrio,

Antiquitas quod pridem inussit, scilicet

Quod barbare doctae sient, ac nos uti

Apollinares lixae, & indoctum genus

Doctissimorum simus, artis rudera.

At vos miselli, nostra qui sic studia

Vappam vocatis, somnia, & deliria,

Audite Sermones, libros BACONIDAE,

BACONIDAE, qui vel pudorem provocat

Priscis, & admirationem posteris.

Nusquam illa, nusquam augusta majestas viget,

Dulcore verborum imperans, suadens, decens;

Nec multiplex sensus brevi compendio,

Sermonis arctatus sereno vinculo;

Nec trita vulgi flexim adaptata usui

Novo ac inaudito, ita ut apparent nova:

Nusquam ista praeterquam tuis, dico, tuis,

Patrone, splendescunt libris, sermonibus.

Sic namque sunt plerunque literariam

Rem qui fatigant, induunt aut stoicum,

Aut incidunt in vile paedagogicum.

Et certe praesto est causa differentiae;

Hi literis subserviunt, illae tibi.

Hinc est, quod unus sic lepore seria,

Sic mitiori docta perfundis sale,

Mensaeque praesidens tot infers ingeni

Scientiaeque rarioris indices,

Ut negligentes quicquid est mensa dapum,

His figimur, sententiam experti novam,

Nutrire posse verba quam cibos magis.

Quis vinculis his, seri amator aut salis,

Non tradat ultro seque vinciri & sua;

His liberis vinclis? At est quod insuper

Me nectit arctius: quod ipse scilicet

Vir destinatus faustitati publicae,

Et rei literariae, mihi tamen

Non diffiteris te & tui notitiam;

Mihi immerenti, qui facultates meas,

Qui corporis mentisque librans indoles,

Et quicquid impoti cadit, sub ingeni

Severiore lance, nil frugi tamen

Occurrit usquam te patrono maximo

Ac optimo dignum: at benignius meum

Rus forsan astrum consequens fruges dabit

Perenniores. Interim quicquid cluit,

Quicquid potest, aut quicquid estBurrhus tuus,

Id omne dedicat, dicat, vovet tibi.

                              Nomini tuo deditissimus,

                                             JOHANNES BURRHUS:

                               postea Eques Auratus,& principalis

                                Heraldus, Garterius dictus.

Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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JOHN BOROUGH'S TRANSLATION

“To the Man, greater than all praise can reach, Francis Bacon, my sole venerated Patron.”

Thus it is, Poets, with those to whom Fortune assigned, at their birth, vain, empty arts, with neither wealth, household, nor substance. May I, then, gird myself with modesty, for I known either the chinking of coin nor the loaded board-as an island floating in a sea of broth, but destitute of meat. May they (the poets), living upon their own produce, be granted the taste of just so much wine as may suffice to moisten, when dry, the (palate of) the God of Art. Those who snatch at the spice and seasonings of life-the skirmishes of words which in the Arts stir strife-all that they catch they forthwith write in verse, thinking that ample credence is obtained by measuring feigned deeds with praise of song. Hence, not unfairly, we esteem those men unequal to their virtuous qualities, whom Poesy-skilled architect of speech-fashions but at random on her anvil. But what have I to fear from such as these? Stay, Pomp and Envy! Listen, Flattery! and hear all you, with your ill-gotten gains; for you are not ashamed, although unwilling to help unfold these great mysterious things.

O Bacon! Literature’s star, honey-sweet wine, glory of eloquence, learning, law, who breathed forth the breath of poetry, illustrious wast thou by their parents’ stock, but greater far by qualities inborn, and gifts which cannot come by arbitrary chance. Now, Briton’s laws stand firm for future times, freed from the ills Antiquity did brand; from laws, indeed, which were too rudely taught.

We (poets) mere camp-followers of Apollo, are yet a race untaught by learned men, making mere patchworks, smatterings of our art. Poor wretches! You who speak of all our labours as nothing more than dreams and fantasies, now hearken to the Books and Treatises, children of Bacon-children of him who puts the ancients all to shame, claiming for him Posterity’s sure admiration. Where else does such an august majesty flourish, commanding language all so sweet, persuasive, comely? And where else are contained such manifold meanings, wrapped in lines so brief, or bound up in so calm a chain of speech? Or trite sayings, from sources old and new, taken and easily made so fit for common use, yet so as ever to seem fresh and new?

Again, I say, my Patron, that nowhere, excepting in thy writings and thy books, do these (thy varied graces) shine in words. For those who toil and plod in writer’s work seem mostly to assume the stoic style, or style still cheaper, easier, of the pedant. And to this cause the difference is due, that whilst with them their style governs their subject, with you your subject ever governs your style.

Hence is it that, with charm and gravity, thou alone art able at one time to pour forth floods of wisdom; at another, and with mellower wit (perchance, presiding at thy table), thou dost display such proofs of highest genius, knowledge still rarer and more wonderful, that, quite neglecting all the feast at table, by having tasted this food of the mind, we are struck by surprise to find that words like thine are more sustaining far than common food. Who that loves discourse and wit but would be gladly bound in chains like these, bonds and no bonds (of love and mutual knowledge)? There is a thing which knits me closer still; it is that, though thou art a man destined by Fate to live for the well-being of our Race, and for the World of Letters, yet even to me thou hast not disavowed thyself. Not to unmeriting me dost thou deny thy knowledge, though weighing in the sterner balance of thy genius my weak abilities, and powers of mind and body. I know that nothing can be met with anywhere   thee, O greatest, best of Patrons!

Yet, perchance, my rural country, under a kindlier star, shall yield perennial fruit. Meanwhile, all that is purifying, all possible, or that is accomplished, thy Burrhus dedicates, proclaims, and vows it all to thee.

Most truly beholden to thy Name,

JOHN BURRHUS.

Afterward Golden Knight and Chief Herald, Member of the Garter.

This excellent and pithy summary of our Poet’s literary graces contains one sentence, which we have italicised. It re-echoes Bacon’s words about style:- “Style should be according to the subject matter .” A hard saying to those who have but little variety of matter, and none of style. How frequently do we hear it asserted that “Bacon could not have written Shakespeare, because the styles are so entirely dissimilar.” Certainly our mightiest Poet and noblest Orator would not adopt for the style of his Comedies, Tragedies, Sonnets, and heroic Verse, the “style” of his Law Tracts, Scientific Treatises, or even of his pithiest Essays. Yet the poetry is in the Essays, the Science in the Plays; and the Love songs, the Vocabulary, the peculiarities of Grammar, the Antitheses, the Quibbles, the Epigrams, Axioms, Analogies, Comparisons, Metaphors, Similes, and all else that makes up beautiful language, are everywhere. “Time, that great arbiter,” will prove these things.

 John Burroughs also bears witness to the truth of Dr. Wm. Rawley’s record that the dinner-parties of Francis Bacon were rather refections of the mind than of the stomach. He knew even of gentlemen who took notes of this table-talk (was John Selden one of these?), and the evidence of Ben Jonson is to the same effect. Men could not cough or turn aside their heads lest for an instant they should lose the words which fell from his lips.

[‘“Manes Verulamiani”’, Baconiana, Vol. VI, New Series, No. 21, January 1898, pp. 36-38]

Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

JOHN BOROUGH'S TRANSLATION

“To the Man, greater than all praise can reach, Francis Bacon, my sole venerated Patron.”

Thus it is, Poets, with those to whom Fortune assigned, at their birth, vain, empty arts, with neither wealth, household, nor substance. May I, then, gird myself with modesty, for I known either the chinking of coin nor the loaded board-as an island floating in a sea of broth, but destitute of meat. May they (the poets), living upon their own produce, be granted the taste of just so much wine as may suffice to moisten, when dry, the (palate of) the God of Art. Those who snatch at the spice and seasonings of life-the skirmishes of words which in the Arts stir strife-all that they catch they forthwith write in verse, thinking that ample credence is obtained by measuring feigned deeds with praise of song. Hence, not unfairly, we esteem those men unequal to their virtuous qualities, whom Poesy-skilled architect of speech-fashions but at random on her anvil. But what have I to fear from such as these? Stay, Pomp and Envy! Listen, Flattery! and hear all you, with your ill-gotten gains; for you are not ashamed, although unwilling to help unfold these great mysterious things.

O Bacon! Literature’s star, honey-sweet wine, glory of eloquence, learning, law, who breathed forth the breath of poetry, illustrious wast thou by their parents’ stock, but greater far by qualities inborn, and gifts which cannot come by arbitrary chance. Now, Briton’s laws stand firm for future times, freed from the ills Antiquity did brand; from laws, indeed, which were too rudely taught.

We (poets) mere camp-followers of Apollo, are yet a race untaught by learned men, making mere patchworks, smatterings of our art. Poor wretches! You who speak of all our labours as nothing more than dreams and fantasies, now hearken to the Books and Treatises, children of Bacon-children of him who puts the ancients all to shame, claiming for him Posterity’s sure admiration. Where else does such an august majesty flourish, commanding language all so sweet, persuasive, comely? And where else are contained such manifold meanings, wrapped in lines so brief, or bound up in so calm a chain of speech? Or trite sayings, from sources old and new, taken and easily made so fit for common use, yet so as ever to seem fresh and new?

Again, I say, my Patron, that nowhere, excepting in thy writings and thy books, do these (thy varied graces) shine in words. For those who toil and plod in writer’s work seem mostly to assume the stoic style, or style still cheaper, easier, of the pedant. And to this cause the difference is due, that whilst with them their style governs their subject, with you your subject ever governs your style.

Hence is it that, with charm and gravity, thou alone art able at one time to pour forth floods of wisdom; at another, and with mellower wit (perchance, presiding at thy table), thou dost display such proofs of highest genius, knowledge still rarer and more wonderful, that, quite neglecting all the feast at table, by having tasted this food of the mind, we are struck by surprise to find that words like thine are more sustaining far than common food. Who that loves discourse and wit but would be gladly bound in chains like these, bonds and no bonds (of love and mutual knowledge)? There is a thing which knits me closer still; it is that, though thou art a man destined by Fate to live for the well-being of our Race, and for the World of Letters, yet even to me thou hast not disavowed thyself. Not to unmeriting me dost thou deny thy knowledge, though weighing in the sterner balance of thy genius my weak abilities, and powers of mind and body. I know that nothing can be met with anywhere   thee, O greatest, best of Patrons!

Yet, perchance, my rural country, under a kindlier star, shall yield perennial fruit. Meanwhile, all that is purifying, all possible, or that is accomplished, thy Burrhus dedicates, proclaims, and vows it all to thee.

Most truly beholden to thy Name,

JOHN BURRHUS.

Afterward Golden Knight and Chief Herald, Member of the Garter.

This excellent and pithy summary of our Poet’s literary graces contains one sentence, which we have italicised. It re-echoes Bacon’s words about style:- “Style should be according to the subject matter .” A hard saying to those who have but little variety of matter, and none of style. How frequently do we hear it asserted that “Bacon could not have written Shakespeare, because the styles are so entirely dissimilar.” Certainly our mightiest Poet and noblest Orator would not adopt for the style of his Comedies, Tragedies, Sonnets, and heroic Verse, the “style” of his Law Tracts, Scientific Treatises, or even of his pithiest Essays. Yet the poetry is in the Essays, the Science in the Plays; and the Love songs, the Vocabulary, the peculiarities of Grammar, the Antitheses, the Quibbles, the Epigrams, Axioms, Analogies, Comparisons, Metaphors, Similes, and all else that makes up beautiful language, are everywhere. “Time, that great arbiter,” will prove these things.

 John Burroughs also bears witness to the truth of Dr. Wm. Rawley’s record that the dinner-parties of Francis Bacon were rather refections of the mind than of the stomach. He knew even of gentlemen who took notes of this table-talk (was John Selden one of these?), and the evidence of Ben Jonson is to the same effect. Men could not cough or turn aside their heads lest for an instant they should lose the words which fell from his lips.

[‘“Manes Verulamiani”’, Baconiana, Vol. VI, New Series, No. 21, January 1898, pp. 36-38]

Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Borough

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THE CONTRIBUTORS OF THE VERSES TO THE MEMORIAE

The Memoriae collection comprises of thirty-two verses. Sixteen of them are signed and seven of them have either initials (three) or initials and university college (four). The remaining nine verses are left anonymous. The individuals who contributed the Latin verses to the Memoriae were mainly prominent members of society among them statesmen, divines, royal chaplains, men of law, scholars, writers, poets and dramatists. Nineteen contributors were from Cambridge University, one from Oxford University, two from the Inns of Court with one non university man, Bacon’s servant William Atkins.

Seven of the Trinity College contributors were educated at Westminster School where William Camden was deputy headmaster and later headmaster in 1593. Camden was a close friend of Bacon, and his famous book on British history Britannia (1586) was dedicated to Bacon’s uncle Lord Burghley who had helped him with the project. Camden was an eminent writer, historian and antiquarian. A wise and good man who was held in great esteem by the many boys he taught, and particularly by one of his most famous and devoted pupils the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson who wrote of his old teacher: ‘Camden, most reverend head, to whom I owe All that I am in arts, all that I know. ‘

One of Bacon’s translators Bishop John Hacket owner of a Shakespeare First Folio was another famous Westminster pupil, a close friend of George Herbert (elegy 3), Robert Creighton (elegy 9), Herbert Thorndike (elegy 13), James Duport (elegy 22), Henry Ferne (elegy 26) and Thomas Randolph (elegy 32).

Many contributors were friends and all would have known each other inextricably linked by their love and admiration for Bacon. They pay their respects to a man who had been the guiding spirit behind a movement dedicated to the advancement and betterment of humankind. Of the nine anonymous verses and the many that Rawley saw fit not to publish Ben Jonson and other prominent men of the day were most probably contributors. Their testimonies of their departed friend may have been a little too near the truth for open inclusion. Many, if not all, of the Memoriae contributors were likely secret members of Bacon’s Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood and privy to the secret that he was the concealed author of the Shakespeare poems and plays.

On the title page of the Memoriae there are 83 letters above the horizontal line and 5 words below it plus the addition of the date 1+6+2+6=15: 83+5+15=103 Shakespeare in simple cipher elegantly yielding the simple hidden message that Bacon is Shakespeare.

Minute Trailer:   https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE  

Full Video:  https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc  

Book:    https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument

Screenshot (1871).png

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Hi A Phoenix,

First of all, and once again, thank you so much for continuing to share with us great stuff on a daily basis !🙏❤️

I do not know why but it is as if I was seeing this title-page for the first time, with fresh eyes.

It reminded me my findings in the first Elegy with Latin words hidden verticaly.

image.png.b11d0099d18ecb3539508da2b6c20462.png

Falco (Falcon) Pilum (Spear) Odarium (Ode/Song) Artes (Art) Bacon

I just thought to myself, that a Latin word should be concealed in the middle (Mediocria firma).

And I think that I found it ! 😊

image.png.e004592dec174a6028f5ee39dd84a313.png

CORONATUM ( CROWNED / WREATHED)

And here is one possible solution with the remaining capital letters in acrostic ... 

VV. S.S. HID Lo. F.B.

VV(illiam) S(hake)-S(peare) hid Lo(rd) F(rancis) B(acon)

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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Hi everyone,

Here is something else that I have just found in the title-page of Manes Verulamiani.

I found the word "ORBIS" meaning "Circle" written in a vertical.

What if the size of the letters on each line had been chosen deliberately in order to conceal the words "ORBIS" and "CORONATUM"?

I wondered if "ORBIS" could be another clue, an invitation to draw a circle that could hide an important message.

Here is one suggestion ...

image.png.dda0b054380efb1ec7cf1d49f3519fe6.png

 

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