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A Small Detail Which Exposes the Grand Scheme


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I ran across the following while browsing at:

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/overview/book/F1.html

where is described one certain copy of the First Folio. They say:

---------
Copy Comments:
Portrait in second state; signed Martin Droeshout, London sculpsit. Size: 12 3/8" x 8". 

454 leaves:

the first 9 preliminary matter, 
the Comedies 152, 
the Histories 132, 
Troylus and Cressida 15, 
the Tragedies 146. 

A fine copy; bound in full 19th cent. red morocco.
---------

The first and fourth lines are a real jaw-dropper, and I strongly believe this reinforces my theory about the ultimate meaning and purpose of the First Folio, which is adapted from Margaret Barsi-Greene, and which is:

Sir Francis saw, by 1623, that no apparent progress had been made towards anyone decoding the secret messages he had concealed within the First Folio for Posterity. As I have been presenting on my website, New Gorhambury, he apparently saw that time was running out, and lest his twenty-year project disappear altogether, in 1623 he was introducing an escalating spiral of hints and clews to aid in decoding the two major encryption methods of his invention, the Biliteral Cipher, and the Word Cipher. Today we call the Biliteral Cipher the Binary Code, and it underlies everything in the Digital World we today spend our lives swimming in. Sir Francis invented the Binary Code when he was about seventeen years old.

His two great steganographic codes are intertwined over all 900+ pages of the Fist Folio, and span all 36 of the Playes. Splicing-in any additional clews then would require extensive re-engineering of the surrounding non-secret text. Instead, at the very end, he inserted five brief, standalone texts, since that could be done without discombobulating all the rest. These are listed and analyzed in near-obsessive detail on my new Web page, The Final Clews.

None of the five are of any literary merit whatever, they are just filler text, just what FB might have rescued from his wastebasket at Gorhambury. Scholars seem perplexed about why such rubbish was included into the First Folio at all. But I'm not.

The lengthiest of these is the one-page Prologue from Troilus and Cressida. It is the focus of my Experiment One, where I present copious background information, and do so visually, wherever possible.

This is what is new here:

The pages of the First Folio are grouped into units called Leaves. The reader of the book will never be aware of how the pages are divided into the Leaves, it's typically just a mundane invisible implementation detail. 


But for this ultra-classic book:

------
454 leaves:

1. the first 9 preliminary matter, 
2. the Comedies 152, 
3. the Histories 132, 
4. Troylus and Cressida 15, 
5. the Tragedies 146.

------

Numbers 2,3 and 5 make perfect sense, the overall structure of the First Folio is Comedies, Histories and Tragedies.

catalog-border-668x1024-1.webp.cf92b9f4d62eef0247ec93dd779ed83e.webp

 

This is reflected in the Catalogue page, one of five of the valueless blurbs of "preliminary matter". But note that the play Troilus and Cressida is the only one of the 36 that doesn't appear in the Catalogue. This points to it being among of the last batch of things spliced-in for the penultimate press run, to secretly incorporate the final Clews whithout upsetting all the rest. 

Doesn't Item Number 4 seem incomprehensible? Troilus and Cressida is widely accepted to be the least successful of the 36 plays. Why waste 15 leaves on such rubbish? Why does it stand apart from all the others?

My Experiment One shows the decoded secret message within the Prologue, and the other five can also be found in Overview of Riverbank Publications Baconian Monographs.

It was always the primary goal of the New Gorhambury project to use computer-aided methods to decode the secret messages in a way vastly less onerous than before, and in a way unbiased by human interpretation of individuals. My Prologue work builds on the efforts of others in the 1890's which was published in the Riverbank Monographs many years later. Having the Prologue correctly decoded is an essential resource for bootstrapping the decoding of the rest of the 900+ pages.
 

Edited by FB Decipherer
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3 hours ago, FB Decipherer said:

I ran across the following while browsing at:

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/overview/book/F1.html

where is described one certain copy of the First Folio. They say:

---------
Copy Comments:
Portrait in second state; signed Martin Droeshout, London sculpsit. Size: 12 3/8" x 8". 

454 leaves:

the first 9 preliminary matter, 
the Comedies 152, 
the Histories 132, 
Troylus and Cressida 15, 
the Tragedies 146. 

A fine copy; bound in full 19th cent. red morocco.
---------

The first and fourth lines are a real jaw-dropper, and I strongly believe this reinforces my theory about the ultimate meaning and purpose of the First Folio, which is adapted from Margaret Barsi-Greene, and which is:

Sir Francis saw, by 1623, that no apparent progress had been made towards anyone decoding the secret messages he had concealed within the First Folio for Posterity. As I have been presenting on my website, New Gorhambury, he apparently saw that time was running out, and lest his twenty-year project disappear altogether, in 1623 he was introducing an escalating spiral of hints and clews to aid in decoding the two major encryption methods of his invention, the Biliteral Cipher, and the Word Cipher. Today we call the Biliteral Cipher the Binary Code, and it underlies everything in the Digital World we today spend our lives swimming in. Sir Francis invented the Binary Code when he was about seventeen years old.

His two great steganographic codes are intertwined over all 900+ pages of the Fist Folio, and span all 36 of the Playes. Splicing-in any additional clews then would require extensive re-engineering of the surrounding non-secret text. Instead, at the very end, he inserted five brief, standalone texts, since that could be done without discombobulating all the rest. These are listed and analyzed in near-obsessive detail on my new Web page, The Final Clews.

None of the five are of any literary merit whatever, they are just filler text, just what FB might have rescued from his wastebasket at Gorhambury. Scholars seem perplexed about why such rubbish was included into the First Folio at all. But I'm not.

The lengthiest of these is the one-page Prologue from Troilus and Cressida. It is the focus of my Experiment One, where I present copious background information, and do so visually, wherever possible.

This is what is new here:

The pages of the First Folio are grouped into units called Leaves. The reader of the book will never be aware of how the pages are divided into the Leaves, it's typically just a mundane invisible implementation detail. 


But for this ultra-classic book:

------
454 leaves:

1. the first 9 preliminary matter, 
2. the Comedies 152, 
3. the Histories 132, 
4. Troylus and Cressida 15, 
5. the Tragedies 146.

------

Numbers 2,3 and 5 make perfect sense, the overall structure of the First Folio is Comedies, Histories and Tragedies.

catalog-border-668x1024-1.webp.cf92b9f4d62eef0247ec93dd779ed83e.webp

 

This is reflected in the Catalogue page, one of five of the valueless blurbs of "preliminary matter". But note that the play Troilus and Cressida is the only one of the 36 that doesn't appear in the Catalogue. This points to it being among of the last batch of things spliced-in for the penultimate press run, to secretly incorporate the final Clews whithout upsetting all the rest. 

Doesn't Item Number 4 seem incomprehensible? Troilus and Cressida is widely accepted to be the least successful of the 36 plays. Why waste 15 leaves on such rubbish? Why does it stand apart from all the others?

My Experiment One shows the decoded secret message within the Prologue, and the other five can also be found in Overview of Riverbank Publications Baconian Monographs.

It was always the primary goal of the New Gorhambury project to use computer-aided methods to decode the secret messages in a way vastly less onerous than before, and in a way unbiased by human interpretation of individuals. My Prologue work builds on the efforts of others in the 1890's which was published in the Riverbank Monographs many years later. Having the Prologue correctly decoded is an essential resource for bootstrapping the decoding of the rest of the 900+ pages.
 

Jaw-droppingly original, PhD standard research. I sense a genuine, respectful awareness of Bacon's true greatness in everything you write - which is wonderful. Deep insights, too!

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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

Jaw-droppingly original, PhD standard research. I sense a genuine, respectful awareness of Bacon's true greatness in everything you write - which is wonderful. Deep insights, too!

Soliloquy to a Decipherer    

From New Gorhambury by F B Decipherer

https://gorhambury.org/public/tune-in-psychically/

https://gorhambury.org/public/exhibits/i-prince-tudor-wrote-shakespeare/soliloquy-to-a-decipherer/

ScreenShot2024-01-13at9_34_16pm.png.ad05a4dd3b6b2fcf830d39158ca58935.pngScreenShot2024-01-13at9_33_55pm.png.cd74932e31d2ea1e8ed27b1bc22152d1.png

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I would like to see a large chunk of your original subject text side by side with your biliteral decoding  results.

It would be a good thing to compare both texts, letter for letter. This is useful because you seem to show so very little

in your website, where you mention differences in two letters: "T" and "h". I could find nothing of value in it. Perhaps you might enlighten me?

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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The project is a work-in-progress for using computer-aided methods to validate the manual decoding Elizabeth Wells Gallup performed in the 1890's. Her book is available from the website.

I thought it would take about a week to write the decoding program, but now that 1.5 years have past with my head buried in the attempt, it's clear to see why no one previously has accomplished this. 

The website is for presenting interim progress.  It's unfortunate that you thought the work is complete already.

Do you have experience with Convolutional Neural Networks? Know anyone who does?

Edited by FB Decipherer
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10 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Jaw-droppingly original, PhD standard research. I sense a genuine, respectful awareness of Bacon's true greatness in everything you write - which is wonderful. Deep insights, too!

Thanks for your kind words, I draw encouragement from this.

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2 hours ago, FB Decipherer said:

The project is a work-in-progress for using computer-aided methods to validate the manual decoding Elizabeth Wells Gallup performed in the 1890's. Her book is available from the website.

I thought it would take about a week to write the decoding program, but now that 1.5 years have past with my head buried in the attempt, it's clear to see why no one previously has accomplished this. 

The website is for presenting interim progress.  It's unfortunate that you thought the work is complete already.

Do you have experience with Convolutional Neural Networks? Know anyone who does?

 

Simply put, I would like to see a large chunk of your original subject text side by side with your biliteral decoding  results.

It would be a good thing to compare both texts, letter for letter. This is useful because you seem to show so very little

in your website, where you mention differences in two letters: "T" and "h". I could find nothing of value in it. Perhaps you might enlighten me?

Or does your answer mean no?

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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15 hours ago, peethagoras said:
 

Simply put, I would like to see a large chunk of your original subject text side by side with your biliteral decoding  results.

It would be a good thing to compare both texts, letter for letter. This is useful because you seem to show so very little

in your website, where you mention differences in two letters: "T" and "h". I could find nothing of value in it. Perhaps you might enlighten me?

Or does your answer mean no?

I agree that it would be nice to see a sample of the decoding.

There was a guy here a couple years ago who claimed to solve a biliteral cipher with the Shakespeare monument and when examined it turned out to look like hogwash (sorry for the pun). So there is some historical basis for us to want to look into your work so we can publicly support it if we get the same results as you.

Thank you!

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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All of the pages at gorhambury.org which are categorized as Experiments have the corresponding Python source code available via Github, one click-or-tap away. The hyperlink is in the block of buttons just above the text asking, "How's this for Transparency and Repeatability?"

If that were enough you will always find the button illustrated which navigates directly to the Jupyter Notebook for your sagacious perusal.

 

1.png

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20 minutes ago, FB Decipherer said:

All of the pages at gorhambury.org which are categorized as Experiments have the corresponding Python source code available via Github, one click-or-tap away. The hyperlink is in the block of buttons just above the text asking, "How's this for Transparency and Repeatability?"

If that were enough you will always find the button illustrated which navigates directly to the Jupyter Notebook for your sagacious perusal.

 

1.png

Being a programmer by trade (first learning COBOL64 in 1978), knowing enough languages that python is easy for me to follow, it is not your code that I question. My basic simple JavaScript code for L-o-T cipher page is very similar. As far your OCR (Optical Character Reading) application, they are helluva better than 25 or 30 years ago, but still lack perfect accuracy. And the typesets in 1623 were individual little letters and even while made from the same die no two were 100% the same each with some imperfections. For me, if the 1623 First Folio was typed by one single old mechanical typewriter where every letter is imprinted by the same key pounding an ink ribbon on paper we'd be able to do some real biliteral work as someone would have to had added an extra ink flourish or whatever for every biliteral "b" character to create a cipher message.

On 1/13/2024 at 1:53 PM, FB Decipherer said:

Do you have experience with Convolutional Neural Networks? Know anyone who does?

No, not yet. Do have some financial backing? I might be able to take on a limited gig if paid what I get paid. Funny, I usually end up with the weirdest things that nobody else can or wants to do anyway. But I have no "free" time to spare. ALL of my free time is spent right here having fun. 🙂

I think you once said that we humans cannot see what your OCR sees, or something along those lines. I have Photoshop and can take any high res anything and zoom in to where I would compare my sight to any OCR around today.

Yes, I am challenging you, as everybody reading your posts is on some level in their minds. But you appear to be honest, serious, passinate, and doing some work and our support could help make a difference. But know that I am not the only techie reading what you say who can look at and understand your code and wonder about data being deciphered.

One of the first critical lessons I learned as a young programming student in 1978 was, "Garbage in, garbage out." We are not questioning your python programming skills, we want to get a better idea of the data being deciphered. Ultimately, as blind as we humans are, if Bacon left a scientific provable biliteral cipher message using typesets it will take a few independent humans to agree by seeing themselves (ourselves). I am OK with believing a computer program or AI might suggest where to look, but if humans can't verify it with our eyes, it is moot.

 

 

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2 hours ago, FB Decipherer said:

All of the pages at gorhambury.org which are categorized as Experiments have the corresponding Python source code available via Github, one click-or-tap away. The hyperlink is in the block of buttons just above the text asking, "How's this for Transparency and Repeatability?"

If that were enough you will always find the button illustrated which navigates directly to the Jupyter Notebook for your sagacious perusal.

 

1.png

OK, I'm looking...

My human eyes, and some basic experience attempting to read Elizabethan text comes up with a different solution that what your link provides:

https://github.com/FB-Decipherer/Experiment-1/blob/main/Experiment_Two__Bounding_Boxes.ipynb

image.png.26cda45d13b1d9f538e2f682748cc660.png

Yes, to us the "s" looks like an "f", but its not (minisfers and inftruments).

Does it see the upper case "C" of Crownets as a left paranthesis?

Maybe you code corrected it? But this is what I see in your github. 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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37 minutes ago, FB Decipherer said:

Sorry for tardiness of reply, telegraph poles down from storm throughout the Bighorn Basin.

We are freezing in Florida. It did not even hit 60 F today (mid 50s). It looks like it will snow, but I know its just going to be light rain. LOL

But hey, you FB D have a wintry price to pay to live in one of the most incredibly beautiful places on Earth. 🙂

And the cowboys will get the telegraph wires back up before anyone else.

image.png.cb420ace0623be7fe325e9cdccc37f8e.png

EDIT: Just because...

image.png.673eaa02b21e122410855582555a3f0f.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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On 1/13/2024 at 1:53 PM, FB Decipherer said:

The project is a work-in-progress for using computer-aided methods to validate the manual decoding Elizabeth Wells Gallup performed in the 1890's.

What if I take two modern digital fonts, one serif and one sans, provide you or your software a two font key and write a few lines from Shakespeare with my own hidden messages in biliteral cipher that I share here in plain text in two fonts along with the key. Anyone reading could take the time to decipher the messages using the same key. Your program might get some practice and earn some public respect. Especially if it is faster than any humans.

Of course it is likely nobody human would even attempt. That's exactly why your work is important. 😉

Will that work for a demo? I'll do my part if you do yours. 🙂

PS. Hope the telegraph is back up. I am not worried about your electricity so much as I am sure you have a good woodstove to keep you warm and a few cords of seasoned wood on hand.

Side note: Theresa and I watched Society of the Snow and found it powerful. Plus we both remember when the plane crash was in the news when happened. I never read the book but Theresa and all her family has. I may have seen an earlier movie, but this one is good if you like a hard story.

 

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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42 minutes ago, FB Decipherer said:

Yep, it looks like Vern and Chester

For what its worth to AI artists out there, my entire Midjouney prompt was quoting you, "/imagine: Only Vern knows how to get the telegraph working again, and his gout restricts doing field work in the WInter." 😉

 

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

What if I take two modern digital fonts, one serif and one sans, provide you or your software a two font key and write a few lines from Shakespeare with my own hidden messages in biliteral cipher that I share here in plain text in two fonts along with the key. Anyone reading could take the time to decipher the messages using the same key. Your program might get some practice and earn some public respect. Especially if it is faster than any humans.

Of course it is likely nobody human would even attempt. That's exactly why your work is important. 😉

Will that work for a demo? I'll do my part if you do yours. 🙂

PS. Hope the telegraph is back up. I am not worried about your electricity so much as I am sure you have a good woodstove to keep you warm and a few cords of seasoned wood on hand.

Side note: Theresa and I watched Society of the Snow and found it powerful. Plus we both remember when the plane crash was in the news when happened. I never read the book but Theresa and all her family has. I may have seen an earlier movie, but this one is good if you like a hard story.

 

I don't understand the part about the two fonts.

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8 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

OK, I'm looking...

My human eyes, and some basic experience attempting to read Elizabethan text comes up with a different solution that what your link provides:

https://github.com/FB-Decipherer/Experiment-1/blob/main/Experiment_Two__Bounding_Boxes.ipynb

image.png.26cda45d13b1d9f538e2f682748cc660.png

Yes, to us the "s" looks like an "f", but its not (minisfers and inftruments).

Does it see the upper case "C" of Crownets as a left paranthesis?

Maybe you code corrected it? But this is what I see in your github. 😉

 

Thanx for being the first person from this community to look at the page and comment.

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16 hours ago, FB Decipherer said:

I don't understand the part about the two fonts.

Below are two Google fonts. The first is a sans-serif font which means no serifs. The second is a serif font. If your program has the upper and lower case alphabet of each as the key and someone uses both in a biliteral cipher message, your application should be able to decipher it. I'm willing to write the test messages if your python script will take it on. 🙂

The text Google selected was a surprise to em. I think it was reading my reply to CJ and was paying attention.

image.png.f9cb3af65df3aa10c0c1716cd0d13a8b.png

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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