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Not strictly Baconian related, but I organized the monumental Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes 20 volume set into a single pdf for easy ebook reading.


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  • SirGalahad92 changed the title to Not strictly Baconian related, but I organized the monumental Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes 20 volume set into a single pdf for easy ebook reading.
26 minutes ago, SirGalahad92 said:

I'd love to hear a few words on what you think of this, SG92. I opened and have read the table of contents, but have no clue what in the world it means or what its message or purpose is. 😉

 

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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From Google Bard AI:

Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes is a monumental 20-volume series published in 1625 by Samuel Purchas, chronicling the history of exploration and travel, primarily by Englishmen and others, from the Middle Ages to the early 17th century. It serves as a rich tapestry of narratives, weaving together firsthand accounts, maps, and illustrations to paint a vivid picture of the world as known at the time.
 

The series isn't simply a passive record of journeys; it's a vibrant chronicle pulsating with the spirit of the Age of Exploration. We encounter not just maps and compass bearings, but the thrill of encountering new vistas, the anxieties of navigating uncharted waters, and the clash of cultures as explorers encountered diverse societies.

Beyond its historical significance, Hakluytus Posthumus holds literary merit. Purchas, no mere compiler, meticulously edits and enhances the narratives, infusing them with a captivating flair. He inserts his own insightful commentary, drawing connections between disparate journeys and weaving themes of wonder, ambition, and the human thirst for knowledge.

However, it's important to recognize the series' limitations. Reflecting its era, it's not without its biases. The English perspective dominates, and Purchas sometimes succumbs to nationalistic tendencies, glossing over colonial ambitions and portraying indigenous peoples through a Eurocentric lens.

Despite these limitations, Hakluytus Posthumus remains a monumental achievement. It's a testament to the audacity of human exploration, a treasure trove for historians and geographers, and a source of inspiration for writers and adventurers alike. Its echoes resonate across centuries, reminding us of our inherent curiosity about the world beyond our horizons.

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Posted (edited)

Prompt:

Is Sir Francis Bacon discussed or mentioned at all in the 20 volume set Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes?

Answer:

Sir Francis Bacon makes occasional appearances in Hakluytus Posthumus:

Quoted for his emphasis on travel and knowledge.

Seen as a supporter of exploration and English achievements.

His ideas on empiricism and advancement of knowledge indirectly influence the book's focus.

His presence reflects the intellectual and political context of the time.

While not extensively discussed, Bacon's influence subtly weaves through the series, shaping its themes and reflecting his broader impact on exploration and knowledge in the 17th century.

 

Edited by SirGalahad92
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13 minutes ago, SirGalahad92 said:

From Google Bard AI:

Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes is a monumental 20-volume series published in 1625 by Samuel Purchas, chronicling the history of exploration and travel, primarily by Englishmen and others, from the Middle Ages to the early 17th century. It serves as a rich tapestry of narratives, weaving together firsthand accounts, maps, and illustrations to paint a vivid picture of the world as known at the time.
 

The series isn't simply a passive record of journeys; it's a vibrant chronicle pulsating with the spirit of the Age of Exploration. We encounter not just maps and compass bearings, but the thrill of encountering new vistas, the anxieties of navigating uncharted waters, and the clash of cultures as explorers encountered diverse societies.

Beyond its historical significance, Hakluytus Posthumus holds literary merit. Purchas, no mere compiler, meticulously edits and enhances the narratives, infusing them with a captivating flair. He inserts his own insightful commentary, drawing connections between disparate journeys and weaving themes of wonder, ambition, and the human thirst for knowledge.

However, it's important to recognize the series' limitations. Reflecting its era, it's not without its biases. The English perspective dominates, and Purchas sometimes succumbs to nationalistic tendencies, glossing over colonial ambitions and portraying indigenous peoples through a Eurocentric lens.

Despite these limitations, Hakluytus Posthumus remains a monumental achievement. It's a testament to the audacity of human exploration, a treasure trove for historians and geographers, and a source of inspiration for writers and adventurers alike. Its echoes resonate across centuries, reminding us of our inherent curiosity about the world beyond our horizons.

What hit me is what was already on my mind from another thread where CJ always wants to fall back on the English religious belief system 400 years ago when the New Atlantis was beginning. I may use this quote from the G Bard about Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes:

However, it's important to recognize the series' limitations. Reflecting its era, it's not without its biases. The English perspective dominates, and Purchas sometimes succumbs to nationalistic tendencies, glossing over colonial ambitions and portraying indigenous peoples through a Eurocentric lens.

It is easy to look back 400 years and see how their way of thing was a mess. In fact, I can look back 40 years in my life and see how crazy things were then. I bet I could go back 4 years and see changes. LOL

Sounds like a fascinating work you put online! I can filter out what is no longer appropriate thinking today while learning about the real history we live with today. 🙂

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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3 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

What hit me is what was already on my mind from another thread where CJ always wants to fall back on the English religious belief system 400 years ago when the New Atlantis was beginning. I may use this quote from the G Bard about Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes:

However, it's important to recognize the series' limitations. Reflecting its era, it's not without its biases. The English perspective dominates, and Purchas sometimes succumbs to nationalistic tendencies, glossing over colonial ambitions and portraying indigenous peoples through a Eurocentric lens.

It is easy to look back 400 years and see how their way of thing was a mess. In fact, I can look back 40 years in my life and see how crazy things were then. I bet I could go back 4 years and see changes. LOL

Sounds like a fascinating work you put online! I can filter out what is no longer appropriate thinking today while learning about the real history we live with today. 🙂

I didn't put it online, I simply found the best copies for ebook viewing on archive.org and organized into a single PDF.

And I have found that Chat bots such as Google bard can sometimes spit out very interesting responses when connecting two different people or topics. It can also be a good spark notes summarizer for any book that has been uploaded online, fun for any old and obscure ones 🙂

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5 hours ago, SirGalahad92 said:

Prompt:

Is Sir Francis Bacon discussed or mentioned at all in the 20 volume set Hakluytus Posthumus, or, Purchas his Pilgrimes?

Answer:

Sir Francis Bacon makes occasional appearances in Hakluytus Posthumus:

Quoted for his emphasis on travel and knowledge.

Seen as a supporter of exploration and English achievements.

His ideas on empiricism and advancement of knowledge indirectly influence the book's focus.

His presence reflects the intellectual and political context of the time.

While not extensively discussed, Bacon's influence subtly weaves through the series, shaping its themes and reflecting his broader impact on exploration and knowledge in the 17th century.

 

Thanks SG92

Great post. Bullet points much appreciated.

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