Jump to content

TRACING CERTAIN PORTRAITS FROM THE ART COLLECTION AT OLD GORHAMBURY HOUSE


Eric Roberts

Recommended Posts

PORTRAIT OF GEORGE VILLIERS

AS LORD HIGH ADMIRAL

Daniel Mytens

c.1619

 

In her History of Gorhambury (1821), Lady Charlotte Grimston provides a list of paintings brought over from Old Gorhambury to the new neo-Palladian mansion completed in 1784 by Viscount Grimston. Among the pictures she mentions is a portrait of George Villiers, the 1st Duke of Buckingham. The only information she provides is that the artist was Daniel Mytens. The same painting is also referred to by Thomas Pennant in his travelogue, The Journey from Chester to London (1782) who briefly describes the portrait at Gorhambury:

THE beautiful George Villiers duke of Buckingham, in white, with a hat and feather on a table. A minion of fortune, who owed his rise to a handsome face and elegant person: merits ir∣resistible with James I. The king, by the insolence and ingratitude of his favorite, received sufficient punishment for his folly.

GeorgeVilliersBuckinghammytens1626Gorhambury.jpeg.b7f98a7a0a7588cd8027600f33652c3b.jpeg

This version of the portrait is from the Royal Museums Greenwich collections.

Presumably, the Gorhambury Estate owns another variation of the same painting by Mytens. 

 

ScreenShot2023-12-20at9_01_48pm.png.2857f849d3bbe0b2e8b8a66b67d0a242.png

Edited by Eric Roberts
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A few months before he was assassinated in 1628, George Villiers is said to have commissioned Dutch artist, Gerrit van Honthorst, to paint an enormous canvass, about 20 ft x 10 ft, depicting The Liberal Arts presented to King Charles and Henrietta Maria. The painting, which is in the Royal Collection, is also known as Apollo and Diana. Villiers didn't live to see the completed picture.

https://www.rct.uk/collection/405746/apollo-and-diana

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Art_patronage_of_George_Villiers,_1st_Duke_of_Buckingham#Media/File:The_Liberal_Arts_presented_to_King_Charles_and_Henrietta_Maria.jpg

The_Liberal_Arts_presented_to_King_Charles_and_Henrietta_Maria.jpeg.77c559fea05079097888986ba1b2fb74.jpeg

 

 

Another extraordinary large-scale work from the reign of Charles I is the ceiling of the Banqueting Hall, Whitehall. 

BanquettingHouseWhitehallCeiling.jpeg.e05de473ed79d4c4b92d3487c9fa7b15.jpeg

 

 

462649-1541760261.jpeg.3e9772ba858bd5829e62bd14b3109f7c.jpeg

https://smarthistory.org/banqueting-house/

https://www.hrp.org.uk/banqueting-house/history-and-stories/the-rubens-ceiling/#gs.1sx4zp

 

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
  • Like 1
  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ScreenShot2023-12-23at11_57_04pm.png.f126e943842a068c17dba0e4b663ca4a.png

ScreenShot2023-12-23at11_56_42pm.png.94cc068e3b2063d6bcc3bd336cc52911.png

Dear Bacon Experts

Can you perhaps enlighten me as to the extent of the personal connection between Edward Somerset and Francis Bacon? They must have had frequent contact throughout the latter years of Elizabeth's reign and well into the rule of James I. I understand that the Earl of Worcester was one of James's close advisers, as was Francis. Was he a mentor to young Francis Bacon, schooling him in the ways of the court of Elizabeth? For some reason, Lord Verulam kept a picture of Edward Somerset on his wall.

 

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Eric,

There is indeed a link to Bacon. Edward’s son Henry Somerset married Bacon’s first cousin Anne Russell (she was the daughter of Elizabeth Hoby Russell – Bacon’s Aunt) There is a description of the wedding below from wiki attended by Queen Elizabeth (Bacon would very likely have been in attendance along with other family members from the Bacons, Cecils and Russells.

'Henry Somerset son of Edward Somerset

On 16 June 1600 he married Anne Russell, a daughter of John Russell, Baron Russell (eldest son and heir apparent of Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford) by his wife Elizabeth Cooke. The wedding procession with Queen Elizabeth I in a litter is depicted in a painting by Robert Peake the Elder.[8] Afterwards there was a feast and a masque, a 'strange dance newly invented' performed by eight women dressed in silver skirts and gold waistcoats led by Mary Fitton.[9] The others masque dancers were "Lady Dougherty" (Dorothy Hastings), Mistress Carey, Mistress Onslow, Mistress Southwell, Bess Russell, Mistress Darcy, and Blanche Somerset. The queen herself joined the dance.[10]

Anne's paternal grandparents were Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford and his wife Margaret St. John. Anne's maternal grandparents were Sir Anthony Cooke and his wife Anne FitzWilliam.[11][12] A splendid portrait of Anne Russell painted shortly after her marriage sold for 297,000 GBP at Sotheby's London on 2 May 2018.[13]'

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Somerset,_1st_Marquess_of_Worcester

Also Edward Somerset https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Somerset,_4th_Earl_of_Worcester

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

There is indeed a link to Bacon. Edward’s son Henry Somerset married Bacon’s first cousin Anne Russell (she was the daughter of Elizabeth Hoby Russell – Bacon’s Aunt) There is a description of the wedding below from wiki attended by Queen Elizabeth (Bacon would very likely have been in attendance along with other family members from the Bacons, Cecils and Russells.

Henry Somerset son of Edward Somerset

On 16 June 1600 he married Anne Russell, a daughter of John Russell, Baron Russell (eldest son and heir apparent of Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford) by his wife Elizabeth Cooke. The wedding procession with Queen Elizabeth I in a litter is depicted in a painting by Robert Peake the Elder.[8] Afterwards there was a feast and a masque, a 'strange dance newly invented' performed by eight women dressed in silver skirts and gold waistcoats led by Mary Fitton.[9] The others masque dancers were "Lady Dougherty" (Dorothy Hastings), Mistress Carey, Mistress Onslow, Mistress Southwell, Bess Russell, Mistress Darcy, and Blanche Somerset. The queen herself joined the dance.[10]

Anne's paternal grandparents were Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford and his wife Margaret St. John. Anne's maternal grandparents were Sir Anthony Cooke and his wife Anne FitzWilliam.[11][12] A splendid portrait of Anne Russell painted shortly after her marriage sold for 297,000 GBP at Sotheby's London on 2 May 2018.[13]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Somerset,_1st_Marquess_of_Worcester

Also Edward Somerset https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Somerset,_4th_Earl_of_Worcester

 

Thank you so much for explaining the familial link between the Russells and Bacons. Still on the hunt for a portrait of Elizabeth Hatton, this strange picture turned up. 

Portrait-of-Elizabeth-Russell-Penguin-photographer-1-1-1-scaled.jpeg.82a7948c8c8853c5a601622da37379c3.jpeg

ScreenShot2023-12-23at7_41_07pm.png.fb1c73ca44f85d9fdb001795412810a1.png

It is, of course, Lady Russell, not Hatton - alas.

Edited by Eric Roberts
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7b48b1_d9bd8743a328456fb4dbeeff471f2628~
Elizabeth Cooke was an older sister of Lady Anne Bacon and like all the Cooke family had been educated to a very high standard with Elizabeth excelling in poetry and music and becoming a patron of the famous court musician and composer John Dowland. Bacon’s aunt was considered formidable, forthright in her opinions, and a great friend and confidante to Queen Elizabeth.
 
Her first marriage was to Sir Thomas Hoby owner of Bisham Abbey in Berkshire and renowned for his translation of the Elizabethan bestseller The Courtier by Castiglione. Following Hoby’s death she married Lord John Russell. She was a devout Puritan and vociferously objected to the building of Blackfriars theatre near her London residence. Through the sometimes weary support of her brother in law William Cecil, Elizabeth sought preferments and titles for her children and became involved in many litigious disputes and squabbles often turning to her nephew Bacon for advice.
 
She entertained the Queen at Bisham Abbey and hosted the six day Bisham entertainments in the Summer of 1592 written and produced by her nephew Francis Bacon. There are many resemblances between these masques and the Shakespeare plays. Apart from entertainments, the Privy Council were also known to meet at Bisham from time to time.
 
In London she lived in the wealthy area of Blackfriars. She lived next door to Richard Field the printer who printed anti-Catholic works for William Cecil some years before the Shakespeare poems appeared. Down the road was the mansion of Henry Carey Lord Hunsdon patron of the Lord Chamberlain’s men whose daughter Margaret married her son Edward Hoby.
 
Elizabeth was certainly a force to be reckoned with and her and her family exploits are recorded many times throughout the Shakespeare plays. She died in 1609 and is buried near Bisham Abbey at All Saint’s Church in the Hoby Chapel with a magnificent monument erected to her memory designed by her own good self. Bisham Abbey on the banks of the River Thames is standing today very much as it would have been in Elizabethan times. Legend has it that Elizabeth still haunts the old manor house and in the Great Hall her portrait still hangs imperiously watching over all she surveys.
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 3
  • Wow! 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Elizabeth was certainly a force to be reckoned with and her and her family exploits are recorded many times throughout the Shakespeare plays. She died in 1609 and is buried near Bisham Abbey at All Saint’s Church in the Hoby Chapel with a magnificent monument erected to her memory designed by her own good self. Bisham Abbey on the banks of the River Thames is standing today very much as it would have been in Elizabethan times. Legend has it that Elizabeth still haunts the old manor house and in the Great Hall her portrait still hangs imperiously watching over all she surveys.

 

Can't wait to get to know here character in SpearShaker when it hits the big screen. 🙂

10 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Dear Bacon Experts

Can you perhaps enlighten me as to the extent of the personal connection between Edward Somerset and Francis Bacon? They must have had frequent contact throughout the latter years of Elizabeth's reign and well into the rule of James I. I understand that the Earl of Worcester was one of James's close advisers, as was Francis. Was he a mentor to young Francis Bacon, schooling him in the ways of the court of Elizabeth? For some reason, Lord Verulam kept a picture of Edward Somerset on his wall.

This image has more to share. 🙂

image.png.e8351f2bfd39ba5445bac7cd559fc23f.png

  • Like 3
  • Wow! 1

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ScreenShot2023-12-24at7_38_13pm.png.f194bdd5937c14874198ef041021731a.png

Sir Francis Bacon never saw this painting of Sir Edward Calvert, as it dates from c.1630. As members of the Virginia Company, Bacon and Calvert must have been close acquaintances, so it is fitting that the portrait resides at Gorhambury House. Another variation exists in the USA - in Maryland, appropriately enough. 

https://msa.maryland.gov/msa/mdstatehouse/html/rotunda_gcalvert.html

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Wow! 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

 

 

TWO IMPORTANT PAINTINGS FROM THE GORHAMBURY COLLECTION

 

PORTRAIT OF LADY ANNE BACON

1580

ARTIST UNKNOWN

 

image.jpeg.f016308f16ab3fcb417cf83c88d4e109.jpeg

 

 

 

PORTRAIT OF ALICE UNDERHILL/BACON, née BARNHAM

1640s?

ARTIST UNKNOWN

 

image.jpeg.3c0b4925f2810874fe506b8ca56bc682.jpeg

 

 

PHOTO CREDIT: ROSIE GRIMSTON

ScreenShot2024-02-28at10_33_52pm.png.42547648be006f1b7488305772811874.png

 

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

 

TWO IMPORTANT PAINTINGS FROM THE GORHAMBURY COLLECTION

 

PORTRAIT OF LADY ANNE BACON

1580

ARTIST UNKNOWN

 

image.jpeg.f016308f16ab3fcb417cf83c88d4e109.jpeg

 

 

 

PORTRAIT OF ALICE UNDERHILL/BACON, née BARNHAM

1640s?

ARTIST UNKNOWN

 

image.jpeg.3c0b4925f2810874fe506b8ca56bc682.jpeg

 

 

PHOTO CREDIT: ROSIE GRIMSTON

ScreenShot2024-02-28at10_33_52pm.png.42547648be006f1b7488305772811874.png

 

 

 

 

Hi Eric,

I was hoping you'd post them - magnificent! The one of Lady Anne is exactly how I would imagine her to be. I wonder who painted them?

Thanks so much for liaising with Rosie at Gorhambury.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...