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The Special Baconiana edition commemorating the 400 Year Anniversary of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio


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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

LAWRENCE GERALD

The Discovery of Eight Shakespeare Quartos in Bacon’s Library

By Lawrence Gerald

 
   

 image.png.532cc019447a2797388b239aeb862d79.png

'In 1909 eight quartos of Shakespeare’s plays were discovered in the modern Gorhambury house outside St Albans : Titus Andronicus, Richard the Third, Richard the Second, King Lear, King John, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet and Henry the IV. These quartos were found wrapped up in brown paper and stashed behind some bookshelves. They had been placed there and forgotten, when the belongings from the old Gorhambury house (where Bacon had lived to the end of his life) were transferred to the new Gorhambury house in 1754. They had lain dormant in the new house for 155 years! The originals were kept there until 1923 when the Bodleian Library stepped in to look after them and slow their deterioration.

Examining the facsimiles one can see a winged head image on the front page of Titus Andronicus. Two of the plays had no names associated with them. The implications of these quartos on Bacon's property are enormous.

There is no record of them being purchased. If a discovery like this was found in Stratford it would have made international headlines even in 1909, the same year Mark Twain published his book on the authorship issue.'

 

Continue reading about Lawrence Gerald's amazing visit to Gorhambury and his discussion of the 8 Shakespeare quartos 'found' there in 1909 (No. XXI) in The Francis Bacon Society's Journal Baconiana 

Originally published on SirBacon.org : https://sirbacon.org/eightquartos.html

Read the Anniversary Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

LAWRENCE GERALD

The Discovery of Eight Shakespeare Quartos in Bacon’s Library

By Lawrence Gerald

 
   

 image.png.532cc019447a2797388b239aeb862d79.png

'In 1909 eight quartos of Shakespeare’s plays were discovered in the modern Gorhambury house outside St Albans : Titus Andronicus, Richard the Third, Richard the Second, King Lear, King John, Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet and Henry the IV. These quartos were found wrapped up in brown paper and stashed behind some bookshelves. They had been placed there and forgotten, when the belongings from the old Gorhambury house (where Bacon had lived to the end of his life) were transferred to the new Gorhambury house in 1754. They had lain dormant in the new house for 155 years! The originals were kept there until 1923 when the Bodleian Library stepped in to look after them and slow their deterioration.

Examining the facsimiles one can see a winged head image on the front page of Titus Andronicus. Two of the plays had no names associated with them. The implications of these quartos on Bacon's property are enormous.

There is no record of them being purchased. If a discovery like this was found in Stratford it would have made international headlines even in 1909, the same year Mark Twain published his book on the authorship issue.'

 

Continue reading about Lawrence Gerald's amazing visit to Gorhambury and his discussion of the 8 Shakespeare quartos 'found' there in 1909 (No. XXI) in The Francis Bacon Society's Journal Baconiana 

Originally published on SirBacon.org : https://sirbacon.org/eightquartos.html

Read the Anniversary Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

Timeless. Terrific!

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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

KATE CASSIDY

                                The Shakespeare Authorship Question: Unravelling the Mystery                                                   Who wrote the plays, and why?

                     By Kate Cassidy

image.jpeg.fb60ee76b7330b2a020ba2969317d2ed.jpeg

'In the vast realm of literature, few names resonate as profoundly as William Shakespeare. His plays and sonnets have captivated audiences for centuries, leaving an indelible mark on the world of poetry, prose and theatre.

Yet, despite his enduring legacy, a mysterious shadow looms over the Bard himself. For centuries, scholars, enthusiasts, and sceptics have debated the true identity of the man behind the works attributed to William Shakespeare.

Did he really write the plays and sonnets? It is a riddle that has sparked intrigue, speculation, and fuelled a fervent quest for the truth.

This quest is known as The Shakespeare Authorship Question.'

 

Read Kate Cassidy's fascinating unpicking of the Authorship Question here: 

http://www.the-power-paradox.shorthandstories.com/the-shakespeare-authorship-question-unravelling-the-mystery/index.html

Read the Anniversary Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

ROBIN BROWNE

First Folio Fobia By Robin Browne

'(A literary ailment which haunts the academic world. It is a fear that the Folio may contain evidence that Francis Bacon could have encrypted secret messages within the text).

Two years ago, a thought came to me that, perhaps, I could make a small contribution towards the four hundredth anniversary celebrations of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio by proposing an impressive exhibition, entitled:

“The Most Encrypted Book in the English Language”

A number of international venues were approached, Bletchley Park, the British Library and the Cryptologic Museum, affiliated with the National Security Agency in America. The idea was to bring to public awareness via a number of selected libraries, museums and universities the hidden history that had been recorded in the Sonnets, The King James Bible and in Shakespeare Quartos and, more importantly, in the First Folio.

A detailed three-page letter outlining the aims of such an exhibition was mailed to a number of potential venues.  The intention was to expose a substantial amount of ciphers within the works of William Shakespeare, which have laid hidden for centuries. The centrepiece would be the First Folio, which cryptically identifies Francis Bacon as the author, from the very first page to the last play ever written: ‘Let thy indulgence set ME FREE’ (The Tempest). . .'

 

Continue reading Robin Browne's fascinating exploration of First Folio Fobia no. XXII in the special Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

ROBIN BROWNE

First Folio Fobia By Robin Browne

'(A literary ailment which haunts the academic world. It is a fear that the Folio may contain evidence that Francis Bacon could have encrypted secret messages within the text).

Two years ago, a thought came to me that, perhaps, I could make a small contribution towards the four hundredth anniversary celebrations of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio by proposing an impressive exhibition, entitled:

“The Most Encrypted Book in the English Language”

A number of international venues were approached, Bletchley Park, the British Library and the Cryptologic Museum, affiliated with the National Security Agency in America. The idea was to bring to public awareness via a number of selected libraries, museums and universities the hidden history that had been recorded in the Sonnets, The King James Bible and in Shakespeare Quartos and, more importantly, in the First Folio.

A detailed three-page letter outlining the aims of such an exhibition was mailed to a number of potential venues.  The intention was to expose a substantial amount of ciphers within the works of William Shakespeare, which have laid hidden for centuries. The centrepiece would be the First Folio, which cryptically identifies Francis Bacon as the author, from the very first page to the last play ever written: ‘Let thy indulgence set ME FREE’ (The Tempest). . .'

 

Continue reading Robin Browne's fascinating exploration of First Folio Fobia no. XXII in the special Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

It's a great article. Everyone should read. Well researched, challenging - yes, it is disappointing that the world didn't "awaken to Bacon" as the 400th FF anniversary came and went. But there is the 2023 commemorative issue of Baconiana which will go on opening minds for many years to come.

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

ROBIN BROWNE

First Folio Fobia By Robin Browne

'(A literary ailment which haunts the academic world. It is a fear that the Folio may contain evidence that Francis Bacon could have encrypted secret messages within the text).

Two years ago, a thought came to me that, perhaps, I could make a small contribution towards the four hundredth anniversary celebrations of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio by proposing an impressive exhibition, entitled:

“The Most Encrypted Book in the English Language”

A number of international venues were approached, Bletchley Park, the British Library and the Cryptologic Museum, affiliated with the National Security Agency in America. The idea was to bring to public awareness via a number of selected libraries, museums and universities the hidden history that had been recorded in the Sonnets, The King James Bible and in Shakespeare Quartos and, more importantly, in the First Folio.

A detailed three-page letter outlining the aims of such an exhibition was mailed to a number of potential venues.  The intention was to expose a substantial amount of ciphers within the works of William Shakespeare, which have laid hidden for centuries. The centrepiece would be the First Folio, which cryptically identifies Francis Bacon as the author, from the very first page to the last play ever written: ‘Let thy indulgence set ME FREE’ (The Tempest). . .'

 

Continue reading Robin Browne's fascinating exploration of First Folio Fobia no. XXII in the special Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

Thanks to Robin Browne for this quote: If you do love me, you will find me out. [The Merchant of Venice: 3: 2: 41]

I wonder if there are other lines in the plays that Bacon deploys to alert us to his subterfuge?

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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

PETER DAWKINS

   The 1623 Revelation of the Baconian-Rosicrucian Great Instauration                   

           By Peter Dawkins

 The significance of the twinning of the 1623 publications – the Shakespeare First Folio and Francis Bacon’s De Dignitate et Augmentis Scientiarum..

       The Great Conjunctions and their Twinning Effect     image.jpeg.a3c97ae007f4f6e66dc424cde240bce3.jpeg

'2023 is the 400th Anniversary of the publication in 1623 of the Shakespeare First Folio of plays – the folio titled Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. It is also the Quatercentenary of the publication of Francis Bacon’s De Dignitate et Augmentis Scientiarium, the much expanded Latin version of his earlier and original Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human, that was published in English in 1605.

Not only were these two books published in the same year, 1623, but they were also published in folio and close in time to each other, towards the end of the year. Moreover, this was the same year in which a great conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter took place, which occurred on 16th July 1623 in the zodiac ‘fire’ sign of Leo, the Lion. This was the second great conjunction in the Fiery Trigon. The previous great conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter ­– which had  occurred on 17th December 1603 in the fire sign of Sagittarius, the Archer – had been the first of the series in the Fiery Trigon.'

 

Continue reading Peter Dawkins' exploration of the twinning effect of the First Folio and Francis Bacon's De Augmentis no. XIV in the special Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

SUSAN ROBERTS

Shakespeare for Groundlings

By Susan Roberts Australian Baconian

image.png.1c1a78793bd402eafe8ec80c7c715042.png'My path to becoming a Baconian began several years ago when I came to live in Tewantin, Qld, Australia.

As a school girl, I had little or no interest in the works of Shakespeare.  It was only when I retired from work and began attending courses run by the U3A in Canberra, ACT that my mind opened to the wisdom and beauty contained in SHAKESPEARE.

Disappointed when finding Tewantin QLD, had a U3A but no Shakespeare being taught, I asked if I could start up a group, be the facilitator, and hope that learned people would join and give of their expertise.

This happened and I listened, learned and intervened when members with academic egos took to sparring.  Always at the back of my mind questions increasingly popped up.  How could Stratford-upon-Avon, a small farming community, have produced the greatest writer of the English language, plus, as William Shaksper had never left England, how had he acquired such intimate knowledge of the French court as portrayed in Love’s Labour’s Lost?  However, as my Reading Shakespeare Group now had several retired English Literature teachers, I, foolishly, accepted whatever they told me.  It was also made clear that ONE SHOULD NOT QUESTION SHAKESPEARE AUTHORSHIP!'

One of my favourite places to visit on the Sunshine Coast is a second-hand book shop, Berkelouw, in Eumundi, place of the famous Saturday Market.  Whenever in Eumundi (never on Saturday) I always browsed the shelves for books on the Bard.

Perusing the Literature section, a book, which I’d saved from falling off the shelf, had the strangest title: BACON IS SHAKESPEARE by SIR EDWIN DURNING-LAWRENCE.  As the price was only $15, I decided to purchase this small, red book with such an intriguing title.

I knew as I began to read ‘BACON IS SHAKESPEARE’ that I was being shown the answer to the Shakespeare authorship question. Truth swirled around my mind as chapter after chapter cleared out the debris of Stratfordian deception.

And that is how I became a Baconian.'

See IS SIR FRANCIS BACON SHAKESPEARE? by SUSAN ROBERTS now a 4-part series on YouTube.  https://www.youtube.com/@susanroberts3015

 

Read the special Baconiana Journal

https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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On 11/17/2023 at 10:12 AM, A Phoenix said:

BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

PETER DAWKINS

   The 1623 Revelation of the Baconian-Rosicrucian Great Instauration                   

           By Peter Dawkins

 The significance of the twinning of the 1623 publications – the Shakespeare First Folio and Francis Bacon’s De Dignitate et Augmentis Scientiarum..

       The Great Conjunctions and their Twinning Effect     image.jpeg.a3c97ae007f4f6e66dc424cde240bce3.jpeg

'2023 is the 400th Anniversary of the publication in 1623 of the Shakespeare First Folio of plays – the folio titled Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. It is also the Quatercentenary of the publication of Francis Bacon’s De Dignitate et Augmentis Scientiarium, the much expanded Latin version of his earlier and original Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human, that was published in English in 1605.

Not only were these two books published in the same year, 1623, but they were also published in folio and close in time to each other, towards the end of the year. Moreover, this was the same year in which a great conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter took place, which occurred on 16th July 1623 in the zodiac ‘fire’ sign of Leo, the Lion. This was the second great conjunction in the Fiery Trigon. The previous great conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter ­– which had  occurred on 17th December 1603 in the fire sign of Sagittarius, the Archer – had been the first of the series in the Fiery Trigon.'

 

Continue reading Peter Dawkins' exploration of the twinning effect of the First Folio and Francis Bacon's De Augmentis no. XIV in the special Baconiana Journal: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

Hi A Phoenix,

In his great Essay, Peter Dawkins compare the 1645 frontispiece of De Digitate et Augmentis Scientiarum with the 1640 title page of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning.

Book page image

https://archive.org/details/ofadvancementp00baco/page/n8/mode/1up

Facing the 1640 title page of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning, I wondered if "Oxonium" and "Cantabrigia" with "Moniti meliora" that was one of Francis Bacon's motto (the second one being Mediocria firma) could hide more that it seems. Looking for "Mediocria firma" I think that I found something ...

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Warwicum,_Northamtonia,_Huntingdonia,_Cantabrigia,_Suffolcia,_Oxonium,_Buckinghamia,_Bedfordia,_Hartfordia,_Essexia,_Berceria,_Middelsexia,_Southa(m)tonia,_Surria,_Cantiu(m)_%26_Southsexia_(5384788821).jpg

image.png.ed78d41a5cf01b589873e92803490c93.png

Did someone already notice that a straight line from London to Leicester crosses St Albans and that the line is almost in the middle (mediocria firma) between Oxford (in Oxonium) and Cambridge (in Cantabrigia) ?

It could be a way to hide that Francis Bacon (St Alban) was the son of Queen Elizabeth (London) and Robert Dudley (The Earl of Leicester).

 

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Hi Yann,

Brilliant spot. Intriguing possibility, especially in light of the fact that we now know FB was the son of QE and Leicester, and that we also know that FB and his RC Brotherhood use every device possible to quietly communicate the truth about the life and writings of the Great One. 

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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

JEANIE DEAN

Plot Synopsis Chart of  37 Shakespeare Plays

By Jeanie Dean

image.png.80f5cdee42362b2b0fadf8dccf2343a3.png

See the other 33 plays by Jeanie Dean No. XXV in the special Baconiana Journal

https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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BACONIANA CONTRIBUTORS

JEANIE DEAN

Shakespeare's Common Plot Devices

By Jeanie Dean

image.png.7f042e221ce983374df08c37babf8d68.png

image.png.b4d4c8df0edb8cf870bf87ff475da1b8.png

See these hugely infornative Plot Device Charts by Jeanie Dean No. XXVI in the special Baconiana Journal

https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Baconiana-11.pdf

The Francis Bacon Society est. 1886 - become a member: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/

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On 11/18/2023 at 9:10 AM, Allisnum2er said:

Hi A Phoenix,

In his great Essay, Peter Dawkins compare the 1645 frontispiece of De Digitate et Augmentis Scientiarum with the 1640 title page of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning.

Book page image

https://archive.org/details/ofadvancementp00baco/page/n8/mode/1up

Facing the 1640 title page of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning, I wondered if "Oxonium" and "Cantabrigia" with "Moniti meliora" that was one of Francis Bacon's motto (the second one being Mediocria firma) could hide more that it seems. Looking for "Mediocria firma" I think that I found something ...

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Warwicum,_Northamtonia,_Huntingdonia,_Cantabrigia,_Suffolcia,_Oxonium,_Buckinghamia,_Bedfordia,_Hartfordia,_Essexia,_Berceria,_Middelsexia,_Southa(m)tonia,_Surria,_Cantiu(m)_%26_Southsexia_(5384788821).jpg

image.png.ed78d41a5cf01b589873e92803490c93.png

Did someone already notice that a straight line from London to Leicester crosses St Albans and that the line is almost in the middle (mediocria firma) between Oxford (in Oxonium) and Cambridge (in Cantabrigia) ?

It could be a way to hide that Francis Bacon (St Alban) was the son of Queen Elizabeth (London) and Robert Dudley (The Earl of Leicester).

 

Could it be? Where have I herd that before?

The answer to the question of there possibly being some sort of privileged alignment is yes AND no. The reason is because London is so large in relation to all other three three points as to make it possible to have there be an alignment through St Albans (or not). You get to decide if you want one.  It is even possible to play around with the exact points in such a way that there is not only a line going through St Albans, but one that is also perpendicular to the a line from Cambridge to Oxford where the distance to the LL line is equal to both. This I have confirmed this in Geogebra using a Google Earth placement.

What that allow you to do is claim there is a perfectly symmetrical cross there. The angles between points on this cross do not seem to have any particular elegance. The distances offer perhaps one neat feature. The distance from Leicester to St Albans is 0.707 the LL distance, and that is a ratio that is equal to the sine or cosine of 45 degrees. Problem is that has no meaning.

Since none of these places was initially chosen to be on such a cross (no one knew they would grow to be such a size that would allow this latitude of choice) we must conclude that it is coincidental. It is coincidental, but it may also may have been observed. Once it is observed it becomes possible to suggest that there was initial intent that carries meaning. To a casual viewer, such a suggestion may float, especially if if he is hunting for things that one can suggest has meaning.

I do not know how and why we could show that this was ever appreciated unless we were precisely given this to verify.

spacer.png

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On 11/18/2023 at 9:10 AM, Allisnum2er said:

Hi A Phoenix,

In his great Essay, Peter Dawkins compare the 1645 frontispiece of De Digitate et Augmentis Scientiarum with the 1640 title page of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning.

Book page image

https://archive.org/details/ofadvancementp00baco/page/n8/mode/1up

Facing the 1640 title page of the Advancement and Proficience of Learning, I wondered if "Oxonium" and "Cantabrigia" with "Moniti meliora" that was one of Francis Bacon's motto (the second one being Mediocria firma) could hide more that it seems. Looking for "Mediocria firma" I think that I found something ...

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Warwicum,_Northamtonia,_Huntingdonia,_Cantabrigia,_Suffolcia,_Oxonium,_Buckinghamia,_Bedfordia,_Hartfordia,_Essexia,_Berceria,_Middelsexia,_Southa(m)tonia,_Surria,_Cantiu(m)_%26_Southsexia_(5384788821).jpg

image.png.ed78d41a5cf01b589873e92803490c93.png

Did someone already notice that a straight line from London to Leicester crosses St Albans and that the line is almost in the middle (mediocria firma) between Oxford (in Oxonium) and Cambridge (in Cantabrigia) ?

It could be a way to hide that Francis Bacon (St Alban) was the son of Queen Elizabeth (London) and Robert Dudley (The Earl of Leicester).

 

Any ideas why the globe showing the Mundus Visibilis and the one showing the Mundus intellectuallis do not appear to be the same? Compare the latter to the Mundus Intellectuallis globe in Sylva Sylvarum. I am intrigued by the idea that these are not the same sort of representations.  That is to say one is a different sort of projection than the other. The MM suggestion here is that we can mathematically gain the knowledge to represent the world in a differrent way which is perfectly equal.

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51 minutes ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

Any ideas why the globe showing the Mundus Visibilis and the one showing the Mundus intellectuallis do not appear to be the same?

Hi C.J., and sorry but I do not have any ideas.

Here are some links that seem to be interesting:

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/The-two-sides-of-the-medal-created-by-Michael-Mercator-c1589-to-commemorate-Francis_fig3_329249322

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/article/cartography-gigantic-ancient-map-urbano-monte

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