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Tale of Two Sonnets; Sonnet 132 and 33


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As I begin to write this post it is November 7, 2023 and we are In the Sonnets Pyramid design in the middle of Sonnet 132, during Day 311.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet132

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Sonnet 132 is the last Sonnet of the 12th Tier which began on Day 287 in Sonnet 122 with the lines (original spelling and typos);

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#12

TThy guift,,thy tables,are within my braine
Full characterd with lasting memory,
Which shall aboue that idle rancke remaine
Beyond all date euen to eternity.

 

Tomorrow, November 8, 2023 is Day 312 and is the last Day of Sonnet 132 completing the 12th Tier. It is also the 400 year anniversary of Shakespeare's First Folio being published. The final Line of Tier 12 is Line 1847 of the Sonnets. I just learned last night that 1847 is the year that the Shakespeare "Stratford" myth began to take shape in the Scholarly world due to the planning and execution of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, "Where Shakespeare's Story Started."

Now that I have some background information out of the way as far as where Sonnet 132 resides in the design, lets look at what Sonnet 132 says and how it is related to Sonnet 33. To do that, let me share a little about Sonnet 33 with you first. Remember that 33 is the Simple cipher for BACON.

Line 33 of the Sonnet is Line 5 of Sonnet 3 which asks, "For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe" immediately after the word "mother" that ends Line 32:

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Line0032

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Sonnet 33 appears to answer that question.

The first letters of each line of Sonnet 33 contain a signature cipher:

FFKGAWASEWBTYS is 158 Simple, 192, Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye cipher.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet033

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Those four cipher totals are a perfect signature match:

ELIZABETH TUDOR is 158 Simple, 192, Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye cipher.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

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I suggest to you that Elizabeth wrote this Sonnet for Bacon to be used as Sonnet 33 based on a design. Hear her message, and her confession. These are Elizabeth's words to her secret son:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:
Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:
Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack,he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.
  Yet him for this,my loue no whit disdaineth,
  Suns of the world may staine, whē heauens sun stainteh.

 

What about Sonnet 132?

The first letters of the 14 lines of Sonnet 132, TKHLABNDAOTATA are 33 Short cipher as if to point back to Sonnet 33. The 11 letter cipher (lines 2-12 based on the 11 As in Sonnet 66) of Sonnet 132 are -KHLABNDAOTA-- and add up to 84 Simple and 240 Kaye cipher the exact same as ELIZABETH.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet132

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Sonnet 132 is Bacon's answer to his "virgin" mother's Sonnet 33:

THine eies I loue,and they as pittying me,
Knowing thy heart torment me with disdaine,
Haue put on black,and louing mourners bee,
Looking with pretty ruth vpon my paine.
And truly not the morning Sun of Heauen
Better becomes the gray cheeks of th'East,
Nor that full Starre that vshers in the Eauen
Doth halfe that glory to the sober West
As those two morning eyes become thy face:
O let it then as well beseeme thy heart
To mourne for me since mourning doth thee grace,
And sute thy pitty like in euery part.
  Then will I sweare beauty her selfe is blacke,
  And all they foule that thy complexion lacke.

So we see how Sonnet 132 and Sonnet 33 are linked by cipher numbers. Sonnet 33 is written by Elizabeth to Bacon, her son. Sonnet 132 is written by Bacon's Shakespeare to his mother, Elizabeth. We cannot fully understand one Sonnet without the other, they are a pair. Two intertwined.

Elizabeth while acknowledging she is Bacon's mother, is very cold and condescending to her son. "FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene," and she was "Gloriana"? UGH.

Bacon does not hold back on his pain and frustration with his birth mother. I am happy he could leave this for us to share his nightmare. It is horrible, yet gives us a better look at who Bacon was. Let's look closer.

Elizabeth to Bacon:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:

 

Bacon's mother, the "Virgin Queen" Elizabeth begins Sonnet 33 with some of Shakespeare's most beautiful lines. She also answers the question about where is the "faire...vn-eard wombe" mother from Line 33. We cannot forget that at least half of Bacon's genetic genius came from Elizabeth. Apparently they had some intelligence DNA in their Tudor blood. Maybe Bacon also acquired some DNA qualities to keep secrets and live in a world of lies from Robert Dudley, I do not know. Shhhh, I even consider Dee as a possible Bacon baby-daddy, and he had a genius mind.

Kate Cassidy discovered and pointed out that the first four letters of Sonnet 33 are FVII which is a very fun way to hint at 67 which is the Simple cipher for FRANCIS.

F=6, VII = 7, to make 67.

Sonnet 33 (BACON) begins with 67 (FRANCIS). I love it! And Elizabeth Sealed it with her signature ciphers: 158, 192, 59, 340!

Bacon's mother made clear she is the Queen with her "soueraine eie". I often wonder if the "meddowes greene" the "golden face" kissed she had "seene" were when Bacon was a small child chasing butterflies and examining snails and bugs in the dirt. Whatever, this Sonnet was written when Elizabeth was still a poet yet late enough she knew and was telling Bacon he would never be King of England.

 

Elizabeth to Bacon:

Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:

 

UGH, the mother of Francis Bacon is sharing her "this disgrace" (hers or his?) basically paving the way so her son will not be King. She does it with a visible cipher clue about the name her son took, BACON. I can see it at least two or three different obvious ways, not sure which one she intended as the first;

Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,

Are you kidding me?

Don't get me wrong, Sonnet 33 is one of my very favorites, but the Tale is so sad. And it is told in all its hard frigid reality. How can something sound so beautiful and be so tragic???

 

Elizabeth to Bacon:

Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack, he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.

 

Yea, we know, Elizabeth held Francis Bacon (William her son) for an hour or so one morning when the sun came up. And he lived and wore a "mask" ever since as a Francis Bacon. The Droeshout engraving shows a mask, and these are the the lines where Elizabeth tells about the mask. She was proud with "all triumphant splendor" on her "brow', for a moment, maybe a few years. Maybe in some way her life since giving birth to him until she died. Whatever, this one lone Sonnet is her only acknowledgement of Bacon that I know of, and may be all there is.

 

Elizabeth to Bacon in conclusion:

Yet him for this, my loue no whit disdaineth,
Suns of the world may staine, whē heauens sun stainteh.

 

So she said like this, "Sorry kid, you are screwed and it is not my fault." But, Elizabeth, married or not to Robert Dudley in secret, never let Bacon be anything but a bastard of a virgin Queen wearing a mask (two masks; Bacon and Shakespeare).

 

Bacon to Elizabeth:

THine eies I loue, and they as pittying me,
Knowing thy heart torment me with disdaine,
Haue put on black,and louing mourners bee,
Looking with pretty ruth vpon my paine.

 

Francis Bacon wastes no time in Sonnet 132 to express his most son/mother intimate thoughts. He begins that he loves her "eyes", which has more than one meaning. From the time Bacon knew of his Royal birth his love and loyalty had to be for his birth mother. Her "eyes", where they were looking, when they were looking at him, even seeing them in paintings and in parades must have been very emotional for him. Eye contact? I would hope some anyway.

It also appears he loved his foster parents, Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Bacon very much as they raised him to be highly educated with the finest manners and social skills. Yet knowing he should become King of England some day, when his birth mother would (might) say so, would be more important of everything else in life.

Elizabeth said, "my loue no whit disdaineth" and Bacon said, "Knowing thy heart torment me with disdaine, Haue put on black,and louing mourners bee, Looking with pretty ruth vpon my paine."

I have been studying these Sonnets for over 20 years, and every new look brings more shivers to my spine as I learn more about Bacon's life. You know you can really get into the mind of Bacon in these Sonnets. Its in plain text, but the ciphers and hints pierce the veil.

Bacon to Elizabeth:

And truly not the morning Sun of Heauen
Better becomes the gray cheeks of th'East,
Nor that full Starre that vshers in the Eauen
Doth halfe that glory to the sober West
As those two morning eyes become thy face:

You need to see how it was printed in 1609 (colors and arrows added by me).

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/UC_Q1_Son/56/index.html%3Fzoom=500.html

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BACON cipher hint pointing East; Elizabeth held Bacon watching a sunrise looking East when her dream, her "Will" had the potential to manifest.

Pointing West we have a D.

John Dee.

Throughout the Sonnets we hear Bacon in a similar relationship with Dee and Elizabeth. My opinion is that Elizabeth's advisor and in some form a father figure to Bacon is Dr. John Dee who was way more that "halfe that glory to the sober West" that prevented Bacon from enjoying the life he was born to live.

DEE is 14 Simple cipher and JOHN DEE is 188 Kaye cipher. Line 188 in Sonnet 14 says, "Pointing to each his thunder,raine and winde," which to me suggests Dee who is famous for conjuring a storm that help England beat Spain in a sea battle. Dee was Elizabeth's astrologer, advisor, and perhaps her most trusted confidant who knew ALL her secrets. The next line in Sonnets 14 says, "Or say with Princes if it shal go wel" which describes the uncomfortable position Bacon was in waiting for his mother to acknowledge he was her son knowing she would never do that until Dee "from the stars" would he Bacon's "iudgement plucke". UGH

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet014

As much as I get Bacon's words and hints about Dee, let me say that if it were not for Dee I would not know this story of Bacon. Dee is somehow my own connection to Bacon's past. I cannot explain. But I still feel Bacon's agony and hear his words as if he were even sitting next to me now as I write this post.

For conversation sake, how would you respond if Dee prevented Bacon from becoming King William of England to maintain the Virgin Queen lie and then to become England's Shakespeare who was born of a Virgin story? Is the ultimate good for the Whole Wide World yet to be realized or was the tragic facade a failure for humanity?

 

Bacon to Elizabeth:

O let it then as well beseeme thy heart
To mourne for me since mourning doth thee grace,
And sute thy pitty like in euery part.
Then will I sweare beauty her selfe is blacke,
And all they foule that thy complexion lacke.

 

Oh my, Bacon is purging his pain, and anger. I assume Elizabeth was already dead when he wrote these lines to her. Bacon knew he would never be King. My opinion is he never gave up until she was gone, and A. Phoenix mentions word was given by Elizabeth before she died to acknowledge Bacon as King and it was hijacked. UGH.

The Sonnets, "TThy guift,,thy tables" given to Bacon from Dee tell the story. Sonnets 132 and 33 are a "Tale of Two Sonnets".

 

 

 

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  • 4 months later...

I just realized this year, 2024, right now we are finishing Sonnet 33. How did this happen and I missed it?

Life has been a, hmmm, a bit crazy maybe? LOL

But here we are, for a little while in Line 462 of the Sonnets, the last Line of Sonnet 33:

(My wish is that someone will read the original post again that I am replying to.)

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Line0462

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