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The Bacon Blindness & Ignorance of Shakespeare Authorship Commentators


A Phoenix

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Thanking you A.P. for Spear-Shaking  at another snake in the grass.

Nothing truer than truth when a relative to Eddie de Vere, Charles Beauclerk, Earl of Burford, can only obfuscate the Baconian position with ignorance while conveniently pushing for the nepotism of his family tree. And what a freaky tale that tree beholds.

An Amazon reader review of "Shakespeare's Lost Kingdom : The  True History of Shakespeare and Elizabeth" stated it best :

"At a time when Edward de Vere needs carefully composed support, Lost Kingdom is an entertaining and annoying concoction of scholarship and flimflam."

The flimflam may be referring to the evidence free conjecture that  Oxford is Elizabeth's son from an affair she had  around the age of 16 and  besides being Elizabeth's illegitimate son, her lover and father of a joint child, the Earl of Southampton. Personally I can't tell if  this is the 'annoying concoction' or the 'flimflam?'  Somebody please pass the salt and help me out here !

Well I guess that 'carefully composed' support flies  out the proverbial yonder window  quicker than you can say Nothing truer than truth. The irony remains that this cult is still bound to a man named Looney. That's all folks.

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MICHAEL BLANDING

NORTH BY SHAKESPEARE A ROGUE SCHOLARS QUEST FOR THE TRUTH BEHIND THE BARDS WORK

In the last few years the self-taught scholar Dennis McCarthy has received an enormous amount of publicity through his work recently republished in paperback with the dubious title Thomas North: The Original Author of Shakespeare's Plays which ‘has garnered worldwide attention (including coverage in The New York Times, The Guardian, Time Magazine, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe MagazineU.S. News, etc).’. The central contention of his celebrated book is that Thomas North (1535-1603), the supposed translator of Plutarchs Lives, wrote more than thirty plays largely for the Earl of Leicester’s acting company, which were later adapted and reworked by William Shakespeare (i.e., William Shakspere of Stratford) in the 1590s and early 1600s.

In addition to all the world-wide publicity McCarthy has also received the accolade of a supporting full-length work by the acclaimed and prize-winning author and journalist Michael Blanding in a book also bearing a somewhat misleading and disingenuous title North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works winner (under a slightly different title) of the 2021 International Book Award in Narrative Non-Fiction.

On its side sleeve we are informed that its author Blanding:

presents the twinning narratives of renegade scholar Dennis McCarthy, called “the Steve Job of the Shakespeare community,” and Sir Thomas North, an Elizabethan courtier whom McCarthy believes to be the undiscovered source for Shakespeare’s plays. For the last fifteen years, McCarthy has obsessively pursued the true origin of Shakespeare’s works. Using plagiarism software, he has found direct links between Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and other plays and North’s published and unpublished writings-as well as Shakespearean plotlines seemingly lifted straight from North’s colourful life.

Unlike those who believe someone else secretly wrote Shakespeare’s works, McCarthy proposes a wholly original explanation: Shakespeare wrote the plays, but he adapted them from sources written by North decades before. Many of them, he believes, were penned on behalf of North’s patron Robert Dudley in his efforts to woo Queen Elizabeth.

For the purposes of facilitating the fundamentally flawed twinning narratives of his progenitor Dennis McCarthy and his own good self, Blanding in briefly and superficially addressing the long-held conviction that Bacon wrote the Shakespeare works, inadvertently and embarrassingly exposed his own limitations.

Blanding commences the story of how he says the first doubts about the authorship started in the mid-1800s via the writings of Delia Bacon.1 This should have immediately alerted and alarmed any reasonably well-informed Shakespeare authorship scholar. The doubts about the authorship of the Shakespeare poems and plays began almost immediately after the publication of Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594), perhaps most notably by writer and satirist Joseph Hall, (later Bishop of Norwich) and the poet and playwright John Martson, who through a series of satiric works published from 1597 to 1599 identify Bacon as the secret author of the Shakespeare poems.2 As Blanding tells it, when Delia Bacon died the baton was taken up in The Great Cryptogram (1888) by Ignatius Donnelly, a work debunked by the Friedmans.3 His two-volume work was followed by ‘a stampede of other writers sleuthing out increasingly more fantastical messages hidden in the plays’.4 Now adopting a more sarcastic and disparaging tone he tells how the American Dr Orville Ward Owen created a machine with two reels over which he stretched the text of Shakespeare. Using the word cipher system referred to by Bacon in The Advancement of Learning and De Augmentis Scientiarum it revealed a ‘sordid tale’ that Bacon was the concealed son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and the heir to the throne, but the Elizabeth was strangled to death by Sir Robert Cecil before she could reveal the truth.5 Blanding then undercuts and misrepresents the endeavours of William Stone Booth who identified anagrammatic and acrostic signatures spelling out the name of Francis Bacon and then came along Mark Twain who in 1909 published Is Shakespeare Dead? ‘peppered with Twain’s trademark sarcasm.’6 Self-satisfied with his truncated deprecating two page history of Baconian scholarship which for some inexplicable reason went no further than 1909 he mistakenly states that ‘by now, Francis Bacon was already falling out of favor as a Ghost writer for Shakespeare.’7 By way of a grandstanding conclusion for the purposes of summarily dismissing Bacon, Blanding hands down what he believes are three decisive facts and reasons why Bacon could never and did not write the Shakespeare poems and plays, which I here quote in full:

Despite his obvious talents, he had never been to Italy, wrote with a ponderous prose style, and was insanely busy with all his other duties.8

His triple lock cruelly revealed that Blanding was clearly unfamiliar with Bacon’s life and writings and knew even less about the mountainous and irrefutable evidence that Bacon is Shakespeare. As a starting point, he might have done well to familiarise himself with Spedding’s standard fourteen volume edition of The Life and Writings of Francis Bacon, and to arrive at a better informed understanding of his authorship of the Shakespeare works, the scores of Baconian full-length works and hundreds of articles written to that effect.

1] Bacon never went to Italy.

For four hundred years orthodox Bacon biographers have continued to insist that Bacon only travelled abroad to France for three years from 1576 to 1579 and nowhere else. The main reason this lie/falsehood has been maintained to the present day is because of the secrecy surrounding his life and in particular his authorship of the Shakespeare works. Especially regarding whether Bacon ever travelled to Italy because self-evidently the author of the Shakespeare works had a profound fascination with the country, its history, its language and its people. Twelve or thirteen of the Shakespeare plays are set or partly located in Italy: The Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Taming of the Shrew, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Nights Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Julius Caesar, Othello, Alls Well That Ends Well, Coriolanus, The Winters Tale, and The Tempest. His mother Lady Anne Cooke Bacon was an Italophile, lover all things Italian and fluent in the Italian language from which she translated the sermons of the Sienese preacher Bernardino Ochino.9 His mother passed on her love of Italy and taught Bacon the Italian language which he put to good effect in reading the many Italian sources for his Shakespeare plays. He also travelled to the country for which he so clearly had such a love and an all-consuming passion. How do we know this? Because we are told so by his first biographer Pierre Amboise who given the intimacy of his account must have known Bacon (some have suggested that it was even written by Bacon himself):

Bacon himself wished to acquire that knowledge which in former times made Ulysses so commendable, and earned for him the name of Wise; by the study of the manners of many different countries. I wish to state that he employed some years of his youth in travel in order to polish his mind and to mould his opinion by intercourse with all kinds of foreigners. France, Italy, and Spain, as the most civilised of the whole world, were those whither his desire for knowledge (curiosite) carried him.10

1. Michael Blanding, North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works (New York: Hachette Books, 2021), p. 134.

2. See W. Begley, Is It Shakespeare? The Great Question Of Elizabethan Literature. Answered In The Light Of New Revelations And Important Contemporary Evidence Hitherto Unnoticed (London: John Murray, 1903), pp. 1-31 and Basil E. Lawrence, Notes On the Authorship Of The Shakespeare Poems And Plays (London: Gay and Hancock, 1925), pp. 76-107.

3. Michael Blanding, North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works (New York: Hachette Books, 2021), pp. 134-35. See A. Phoenix, The Fraudulent Friedmans: The Bacon Ciphers in the Shakespeare Works (2022) for a detailed and thorough account of how the Friedmans secretly knew Bacon wrote the Shakespeare poems and plays and lied to the world about the presence of Baconian ciphers in the Shakespeare works.

4.  Michael Blanding, North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works (New York: Hachette Books, 2021), p. 135.

5. Ibid., p. 135.

6. Ibid., p. 135.

7. Ibid., p. 136.

8. Ibid., p. 136.

9. Anne Cooke, trans. Sermons of Barnandine Ochino of Sena, Godlye, frutefull, and very necessarye for all true Christians translated out of Italian into Englishe (London: R. Car for W. Reddell, 1548); Anne Cooke, trans. Fouretene sermons of Barnardine Ochyne, concernynge the predestinacion and eleccion of god: very expediente to the settynge forth of hys glory among hys creatures. Translated out of Italian in to oure natyue tounge by A. C. (London: John Day and William Seres 1550-1?); Anne Cooke, and Argentine, Richard, trans. Certayne Sermons of the ryghte famous and excellent clerk. B. Ochine (London: John Day 1551?);Anne Cooke, trans. Sermons of Bernardine Ochine (to the number of 25) Concerning the Predestination and Election of God Translated out of the Italian in to oure natyue tounge by  A. C. (London: John Day, 1570?)

10. Pierre Amboise, Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulam, Vicomtede sainct Alban, & Chancelier dAngleterre (A Paris, Chez Antoine De Sommaville & Andre Sovbron, affociez, au Palais dans la petite Salle, 1631), pp. 1-26; Granville C. Cunningham, trans., ‘A New Life Of Lord Bacon’, Baconiana, Vol. IV, No. 14 (Third Series), April, 1906, p. 74.

 

2] Bacon was insanely busy with all his other duties.

image.png.98d50fe01e413d0901e27752b035ee23.png

 3] Despite his obvious talents Bacon wrote with a ponderous prose style thus he was not Shakespeare

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image.png.a15cc220a6ec1a0ca1890f486b482d2a.png

 

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I remember when Dennis McCarthy's book on North came out, because of it's novelty and publisher publicity  it had it's 15 minutes on the stage. But it's not sticking, no one talks about it. Little impact. But you knew there was something rotten in Denmark with his research. Now thanks to this  A.Phoenix posting we can see the obvious flaws in both McCarthy's and Blanding's books.

Excellent rebuttal with historical truth and Book Review A.P. Thank You. People like "Bland ing" are born to be mild as demonstrated by their pontificating based on  regurgitation of other people's inaccurate opinions revealing they have not read deeply on Bacon's life. Bacon was "insanely busy" is one of the many false narratives that is still passed on from generation to generation. We know that it wasn't until  Elizabeth passed and James  I came in  that Bacon around the age of 46 started to move up the winding stair of public life. In many ways we can be thankful that Elizabeth held Bacon back  as he was able to spend more time with his scriveners  generating plays.

Glad to see you use Pierre Amboise the first Bacon biographer (1631) as a source that mentions Bacon going to Italy. This reference and biography is continuously and conveniently overlooked by our overzealous adversaries because it doesn't fit into their false narrative.
Excellent use of quotes by other writers demonstrating Bacon's varied writing style and remarkable likeness to the works of Shakespeare.
We do know that the Earl of Leicester as a patron of the theater. Not enough has been said about his influence on his son Francis who must have been introduced and influenced by Leicester's family connections and the Sydneys and Wilton house where Bacon was exposed to their  vibrant and creative social gatherings.

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3 hours ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

Bacon was "insanely busy" is one of the many false narratives that is still passed on from generation to generation. We know that it wasn't until  Elizabeth passed and James  I came in  that Bacon around the age of 46 started to move up the winding stair of public life. In many ways we can be thankful that Elizabeth held Bacon back  as he was able to spend more time with his scriveners  generating plays.

Bacon kept busy, there was a lot to do. He had a lot to say. And he left plenty for us to celebrate.

I think below is a rare precamera photo of the first Strats devising their pleasant peasant story about that guy Willy Shax who nobody can remember:

image.png.bbf4175129ba991505e0fdb60e5e52bc.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
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O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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8 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

How do we know this? Because we are told so by his first biographer Pierre Amboise who given the intimacy of his account must have known Bacon (some have suggested that it was even written by Bacon himself):

Bacon himself wished to acquire that knowledge which in former times made Ulysses so commendable, and earned for him the name of Wise; by the study of the manners of many different countries. I wish to state that he employed some years of his youth in travel in order to polish his mind and to mould his opinion by intercourse with all kinds of foreigners. France, Italy, and Spain, as the most civilised of the whole world, were those whither his desire for knowledge (curiosite) carried him.10

What a great statement about Bacon! Great footnote too! Here is a SirBacon.org page with text from Mather Walker containing a version of Pierre Amboise, Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulam.

https://sirbacon.org/amboiselife.htm

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Wonderful to read this:

The Advertisement au Lecteur then follows:

Address to the Reader.

This work of Mr. Bacon's, though posthumous, does not the less deserve to be recognized as legitimate, since it has the same advantages as those that have been brought to light whilst he was living. If the Author had had the desire to see it there, we should have seen this work in the press at the same time as his other books, but having designed that it should grow more, he had intended to defer the printing until the completion of all his works.

 

EDIT:

Adding a Peter Dawkins link: Francis Bacon "born in the purple"

https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Francis_Bacon_born_in_the_purple.pdf

The first biography of Francis Bacon (Discours sur la Vie de Mre. Francois Bacon, Chancelier d’Angleterre) was published in France in 1631, authored by Pierre Amboise, who had private access to some of Francis Bacon’s manuscripts.

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Here is a link to Histoire Naturelle (1631):

https://books.google.fr/books?id=k7qIOnu-aGMC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

And here are some ideas regarding the Title page :

image.png.a13b5b5c2b9ee7425564886e20f922a9.png

https://archive.org/details/accedenceofarmor00legh/page/n183/mode/2up?q=wings

I like the fact that by taking in count the Emblem in the center, there are 33 "elements" ( 32 words and 1 emblem) above the line.

The Emblem (with a Crown) is the 17th "element" and the "Roy" (King) is the 40th ( 4T) and last  "element".

Here is the famous 1740, that Oxfordians like so much and that they use to say that Shakespeare was the 17th Earl of Oxford.

Here, it can be linked to Bacon.

BACON :

"Ce sage Roy de l''Ecriture"

"This wise King of Writing"

(Ode to Bacon by Mr Auvray , in Histoire Naturelle) 

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19 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

MICHAEL BLANDING

NORTH BY SHAKESPEARE A ROGUE SCHOLARS QUEST FOR THE TRUTH BEHIND THE BARDS WORK

In the last few years the self-taught scholar Dennis McCarthy has received an enormous amount of publicity through his work recently republished in paperback with the dubious title Thomas North: The Original Author of Shakespeare's Plays which ‘has garnered worldwide attention (including coverage in The New York Times, The Guardian, Time Magazine, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe MagazineU.S. News, etc).’. The central contention of his celebrated book is that Thomas North (1535-1603), the supposed translator of Plutarchs Lives, wrote more than thirty plays largely for the Earl of Leicester’s acting company, which were later adapted and reworked by William Shakespeare (i.e., William Shakspere of Stratford) in the 1590s and early 1600s.

In addition to all the world-wide publicity McCarthy has also received the accolade of a supporting full-length work by the acclaimed and prize-winning author and journalist Michael Blanding in a book also bearing a somewhat misleading and disingenuous title North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works winner (under a slightly different title) of the 2021 International Book Award in Narrative Non-Fiction.

On its side sleeve we are informed that its author Blanding:

presents the twinning narratives of renegade scholar Dennis McCarthy, called “the Steve Job of the Shakespeare community,” and Sir Thomas North, an Elizabethan courtier whom McCarthy believes to be the undiscovered source for Shakespeare’s plays. For the last fifteen years, McCarthy has obsessively pursued the true origin of Shakespeare’s works. Using plagiarism software, he has found direct links between Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, and other plays and North’s published and unpublished writings-as well as Shakespearean plotlines seemingly lifted straight from North’s colourful life.

Unlike those who believe someone else secretly wrote Shakespeare’s works, McCarthy proposes a wholly original explanation: Shakespeare wrote the plays, but he adapted them from sources written by North decades before. Many of them, he believes, were penned on behalf of North’s patron Robert Dudley in his efforts to woo Queen Elizabeth.

For the purposes of facilitating the fundamentally flawed twinning narratives of his progenitor Dennis McCarthy and his own good self, Blanding in briefly and superficially addressing the long-held conviction that Bacon wrote the Shakespeare works, inadvertently and embarrassingly exposed his own limitations.

Blanding commences the story of how he says the first doubts about the authorship started in the mid-1800s via the writings of Delia Bacon.1 This should have immediately alerted and alarmed any reasonably well-informed Shakespeare authorship scholar. The doubts about the authorship of the Shakespeare poems and plays began almost immediately after the publication of Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594), perhaps most notably by writer and satirist Joseph Hall, (later Bishop of Norwich) and the poet and playwright John Martson, who through a series of satiric works published from 1597 to 1599 identify Bacon as the secret author of the Shakespeare poems.2 As Blanding tells it, when Delia Bacon died the baton was taken up in The Great Cryptogram (1888) by Ignatius Donnelly, a work debunked by the Friedmans.3 His two-volume work was followed by ‘a stampede of other writers sleuthing out increasingly more fantastical messages hidden in the plays’.4 Now adopting a more sarcastic and disparaging tone he tells how the American Dr Orville Ward Owen created a machine with two reels over which he stretched the text of Shakespeare. Using the word cipher system referred to by Bacon in The Advancement of Learning and De Augmentis Scientiarum it revealed a ‘sordid tale’ that Bacon was the concealed son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and the heir to the throne, but the Elizabeth was strangled to death by Sir Robert Cecil before she could reveal the truth.5 Blanding then undercuts and misrepresents the endeavours of William Stone Booth who identified anagrammatic and acrostic signatures spelling out the name of Francis Bacon and then came along Mark Twain who in 1909 published Is Shakespeare Dead? ‘peppered with Twain’s trademark sarcasm.’6 Self-satisfied with his truncated deprecating two page history of Baconian scholarship which for some inexplicable reason went no further than 1909 he mistakenly states that ‘by now, Francis Bacon was already falling out of favor as a Ghost writer for Shakespeare.’7 By way of a grandstanding conclusion for the purposes of summarily dismissing Bacon, Blanding hands down what he believes are three decisive facts and reasons why Bacon could never and did not write the Shakespeare poems and plays, which I here quote in full:

Despite his obvious talents, he had never been to Italy, wrote with a ponderous prose style, and was insanely busy with all his other duties.8

His triple lock cruelly revealed that Blanding was clearly unfamiliar with Bacon’s life and writings and knew even less about the mountainous and irrefutable evidence that Bacon is Shakespeare. As a starting point, he might have done well to familiarise himself with Spedding’s standard fourteen volume edition of The Life and Writings of Francis Bacon, and to arrive at a better informed understanding of his authorship of the Shakespeare works, the scores of Baconian full-length works and hundreds of articles written to that effect.

1] Bacon never went to Italy.

For four hundred years orthodox Bacon biographers have continued to insist that Bacon only travelled abroad to France for three years from 1576 to 1579 and nowhere else. The main reason this lie/falsehood has been maintained to the present day is because of the secrecy surrounding his life and in particular his authorship of the Shakespeare works. Especially regarding whether Bacon ever travelled to Italy because self-evidently the author of the Shakespeare works had a profound fascination with the country, its history, its language and its people. Twelve or thirteen of the Shakespeare plays are set or partly located in Italy: The Two Gentlemen of Verona, The Taming of the Shrew, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Nights Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Julius Caesar, Othello, Alls Well That Ends Well, Coriolanus, The Winters Tale, and The Tempest. His mother Lady Anne Cooke Bacon was an Italophile, lover all things Italian and fluent in the Italian language from which she translated the sermons of the Sienese preacher Bernardino Ochino.9 His mother passed on her love of Italy and taught Bacon the Italian language which he put to good effect in reading the many Italian sources for his Shakespeare plays. He also travelled to the country for which he so clearly had such a love and an all-consuming passion. How do we know this? Because we are told so by his first biographer Pierre Amboise who given the intimacy of his account must have known Bacon (some have suggested that it was even written by Bacon himself):

Bacon himself wished to acquire that knowledge which in former times made Ulysses so commendable, and earned for him the name of Wise; by the study of the manners of many different countries. I wish to state that he employed some years of his youth in travel in order to polish his mind and to mould his opinion by intercourse with all kinds of foreigners. France, Italy, and Spain, as the most civilised of the whole world, were those whither his desire for knowledge (curiosite) carried him.10

1. Michael Blanding, North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works (New York: Hachette Books, 2021), p. 134.

2. See W. Begley, Is It Shakespeare? The Great Question Of Elizabethan Literature. Answered In The Light Of New Revelations And Important Contemporary Evidence Hitherto Unnoticed (London: John Murray, 1903), pp. 1-31 and Basil E. Lawrence, Notes On the Authorship Of The Shakespeare Poems And Plays (London: Gay and Hancock, 1925), pp. 76-107.

3. Michael Blanding, North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works (New York: Hachette Books, 2021), pp. 134-35. See A. Phoenix, The Fraudulent Friedmans: The Bacon Ciphers in the Shakespeare Works (2022) for a detailed and thorough account of how the Friedmans secretly knew Bacon wrote the Shakespeare poems and plays and lied to the world about the presence of Baconian ciphers in the Shakespeare works.

4.  Michael Blanding, North by Shakespeare: A Rogue Scholars Quest for the Truth Behind the Bards Works (New York: Hachette Books, 2021), p. 135.

5. Ibid., p. 135.

6. Ibid., p. 135.

7. Ibid., p. 136.

8. Ibid., p. 136.

9. Anne Cooke, trans. Sermons of Barnandine Ochino of Sena, Godlye, frutefull, and very necessarye for all true Christians translated out of Italian into Englishe (London: R. Car for W. Reddell, 1548); Anne Cooke, trans. Fouretene sermons of Barnardine Ochyne, concernynge the predestinacion and eleccion of god: very expediente to the settynge forth of hys glory among hys creatures. Translated out of Italian in to oure natyue tounge by A. C. (London: John Day and William Seres 1550-1?); Anne Cooke, and Argentine, Richard, trans. Certayne Sermons of the ryghte famous and excellent clerk. B. Ochine (London: John Day 1551?);Anne Cooke, trans. Sermons of Bernardine Ochine (to the number of 25) Concerning the Predestination and Election of God Translated out of the Italian in to oure natyue tounge by  A. C. (London: John Day, 1570?)

10. Pierre Amboise, Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulam, Vicomtede sainct Alban, & Chancelier dAngleterre (A Paris, Chez Antoine De Sommaville & Andre Sovbron, affociez, au Palais dans la petite Salle, 1631), pp. 1-26; Granville C. Cunningham, trans., ‘A New Life Of Lord Bacon’, Baconiana, Vol. IV, No. 14 (Third Series), April, 1906, p. 74.

 

2] Bacon was insanely busy with all his other duties.

image.png.98d50fe01e413d0901e27752b035ee23.png

 3] Despite his obvious talents Bacon wrote with a ponderous prose style thus he was not Shakespeare

image.png.d9c7dbcdd76d4a2d0f70e5dba4eeccd9.png

image.png.f2c962472e1e30fb143f913462066fa9.png

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image.png.a15cc220a6ec1a0ca1890f486b482d2a.png

 

Wowwwweee! Now that's what I call a rebuttal. Thank you A.P. for being a never-ending source of Bacon-Shakespeare knowledge. So much to digest, explore, respond to.

Gervinus was new to me so I looked up the reference you gave. What a fine writer, except that he can't see the wood for the trees. It's actually quite funny how he nails so many parallels between the Shakespeare plays and Francis Bacon's writings, yet can't bring himself to make the obvious leap - that they are one and the same person.

In the final paragraph of the section on Bacon and Shakespeare, he brings in Aristotle's maxim that "virtue lies in the just medium between two extremes" without mentioning the Bacon family motto. I haven't read any of his meditations on the plays, but I suspect they are more interesting than many other attempts to penetrate the mind of SFB.

ScreenShot2023-11-19at9_09_58pm.png.105cb26463105a35615cd019a2554546.png

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https://archive.org/details/shakespearecomme00gervuoft/page/884/mode/2up?view=theater (Vol. 2)

https://archive.org/details/shakespearecomme02gerv/page/n3/mode/2up (Vol. 1)

A long, thoughtful, critical review of "North by Shakespeare": https://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/blanding-north-hyde-review/

This quote says it all for me:

McCarthy says of Thomas North, “He is Hamlet as much as J. D. Salinger is Holden Caulfield” 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

Thank you.

What if Gervinus and other modern scholars were/are secret members of Lord Bacon's Rosicrucian Brotherhood masquerading in public as orthodox Shakespeare scholars, who in private knew or know the Truth about his secret life and writings, including his authorship of the Shakespeare works, but are sworn to strict secrecy not to reveal it, until the invisible directors of the RC Brotherhood decide to finally reveal it to the world?   

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3 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

Thank you.

What if Gervinus and other modern scholars were/are secret members of Lord Bacon's Rosicrucian Brotherhood masquerading in public as orthodox Shakespeare scholars, who in private knew or know the Truth about his secret life and writings, including his authorship of the Shakespeare works, but are sworn to strict secrecy not to reveal it, until the invisible directors of the RC Brotherhood decide to finally reveal it to the world?   

Hi A Phoenix. That is a very interesting conjecture. If it is as you suggest, conditions on Earth are unlikely to improve in our lifetimes. If not now, when is the ideal moment?

We could all do with some mind-altering revelations to shake us out of our belligerent selfishness (as a species, I mean). I liked Gervinus's epithet for Bacon: "renovator".

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Hi Eric,

We all know here on B'Hive that Lord Bacon left numerous contemporaneous clues to posterity about his secret life and writings (historical evidence, manuscripts, documents, textual clues and hints, frontispieces, headpieces, tail-pieces, anagrams, acrostics, ciphers, and other cryptic devices, etc) and down the centuries there has also been some so-called discoveries or disclosures (methods of delivery), for example the so-called Northumberland Manuscript originally containing his two Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III, and the Promus (private note-book) the source of hundreds of resemblances, correspondences and parallels found throughout the Shakespeare canon, and so on, all pointing to revelation by slow degree.  As if working towards some kind of divine plan or timetable for a full disclosure. We know from Lord Bacon and his Rosicrucian Brotherhood that he/they originally planned in some far off distant future to reveal to the world the Truth, as stated around the emblem on the title page of the New Atlantis (or, The Land of the Rosicrucians😞

                                                                                                   IN THE END THE HIDDEN TRUTH WILL BE REVEALED. 

The question is when.

 

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  • 2 months later...

THE IGNORANCE AND DELUSIONS OF ALEXANDER WAUGH

POST BY LAWRENCE GERALD UNDERNEATH THE VIDEO ‘Ben Jonson’s Discoveries Discovered!’ BY ALEXANDER WAUGH

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O60uYDKTqJ0&lc=UgyXRMj-S8rylzmz9R54AaABAg.A-ALiCz6u6SA-khxlGYki-

In the months following Francis Bacon’s death his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and quietly issued a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum. This rare and still virtually unknown work contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon, which his orthodox editors and biographers have simply glossed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare. Secret Bacon-Shakespeare Links - Bacon Verses, Shakespeare First Folio & The Stratford Monument

REPLY TO LAWRENCE GERALD BY ALEXANDER WAUGH:

The document you cite is not ‘virtually unknown’. Pretty well every researching authorship skeptic is aware of it; nor does it ‘portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym Shakespeare’ as you claim. That is a wild stretch. If you do not take my word for it you should at least read Baconian scholar, N. B. Cockburn’s, exhaustive study entitled ‘The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory made Sane’ in which he dismisses your claims as ‘a topic on which the Baconians, mistakenly, set great store’, taking each reference in turn and demonstrating clearly why his Baconian confreres are wrong (see pp. 713-716). The monotonous-voiced YouTube link you posted proves nothing. She was the one who refused my application to become a life member of the Francis Bacon Society. Her standard of scholarship is even feebler than that of Stanley Wells.

REPLY TO ALEXANDER WAUGH:

As stated, the Memoriae is virtually unknown. For reasons that should be obvious it is rarely referred to or discussed by orthodox Shakespeare scholars and is also unfamiliar to Shakespeare Authorship Doubters. Regarding your comments ‘pretty well every researching authorship skeptic is aware of it’: firstly, could you please provide evidence to support your statement; secondly, if by this you mean virtually every Oxfordians, et al, is aware of it or has heard of the title of the work, I assume that being aware of a work or having heard of its title passes for serious scholarship in Oxfordian circles. Or thirdly, could you please provide a list of say half-a-dozen Oxfordians who have thoroughly examined and critically evaluated the Memoriae, in fact, might you even direct me to one full-length book, or even a single detailed academic paper by any Oxfordian on the subject. 

You suggest that I/we read Baconian scholar, N. B. Cockburn’s, exhaustive study entitled The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory made Sane ‘in which he dismisses your claims as “a topic on which the Baconians, mistakenly, set great store”, taking each reference in turn and demonstrating clearly why his Baconian confreres are wrong (see pp. 713-716).’ Firstly, I am very familiar with N. B. Cockburn’s excellent work, but I have no doubt that Cockburn (or any other serious scholar) would not describe his three page discussion as exhaustive, not least because no work is, or ever can be exhaustive. There is a significant amount of material included in the 277-page work on the Memoriae by A. Phoenix published in 2024 not known to Cockburn in a work published twenty-six years earlier in 1998. In light of the new material with the benefit of the full scholarly apparatus supporting it, I think the fair, open-minded and judicious scholar we all know and admire N. B. Cockburn to have been, would most likely have taken time to revisit the Memoriae and after critically evaluating all the evidence and information with the additional benefit of four English translations, which would have probably led him to revise and amend his opinion.     

You refer to the monotonous-voiced YouTube link ‘which proves nothing’ by this I take it you mean the 26-minute video posted on YouTube. This unfortunately reveals another regrettable aspect that passes for Oxfordian scholarship. You show no evidence of having read the 277-page groundbreaking work by A. Phoenix, The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument published on 22 January 2024.  It seems that Oxfordians possess powers that elude Baconians and all other serious scholars, whereby not even having read a work, you somehow by some kind of divine or magical prowess, know what it contains and similarly without being aware of all the relevant, historical research, evidence, and facts, are able to ignore and dismiss it.  

If you had read the above full-length work with an open and impartial mindset you would be aware that the 32 verses in the Memoriae do collectively portray Bacon as a supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym Shakespeare. But here lies the rub. You are simply faced with two choices. You either accept the unmistakable import of the Memoriae revealing and confirming that Bacon is the secret author of the Shakespeare works and the enormous implications which flow from it; or, choose to ignore, misrepresent or dismiss, a contemporary 1626 work which at a single devastating stroke demolishes your whole lifetime work pursuing the Oxfordian delusion, the Oxfordian equivalent of Turkeys voting for Christmas.   

Bizarrely, you state in reference to the ‘monotonous-voiced YouTube link’ that ‘She was the one who refused my application to become a life member of the Francis Bacon Society.’ Here your grasp of basic facts, misidentification, and chronology is beyond embarrassing, and to be honest, is frankly shocking. The ‘she’ who refused your application in 2020 is a completely different ‘she’ to the narrator of the 2024 video!    

Waugh concludes with: ‘Her standard of scholarship is even feebler than that of Stanley Wells’.

This statement reveals the full extent of the ignorance of Alexander Waugh and the Oxfordian movement, more or less as a whole, of which he is seen as a leading light, who I have no doubt is not aware of, and has certainly not read, the large body of works produced by A. Phoenix. 

In a little over three years this output includes 4 heavily researched and referenced full-length books, 32 heavily researched and referenced academic papers, amounting to several thousand pages, fifty-six videos, and more than 3,400 posts on B’Hive.    

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

https://www.youtube.com/@baconisshakespeare/videos

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/

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On 2/14/2024 at 1:59 PM, Lawrence Gerald said:

Tremendous AP. Thank You! The pugnacious bull in the china shop will have his rejoinder soon.

I posted a comment at the youtube page, and I saw it up, but the next time I looked, it was not there, so had apparently been taken down. What I said was that even the most fair-minded and judicious people can have blind spots, and that the real significance of N. B. Cockburn's 740-page book, The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Question Made Sane, was that he tried to cover the whole scope of the case for Bacon's authorship of Shakespeare--what he considered the chief points, as the case existed in 1998, in one book. I might add that, being a barrister, he probably gravitated more towards arguments that could be proven with concrete facts, as in a court of law, rather than towards opinion-based evidence. Even if he didn't say so explicitly, that could be one reason he put the Manes Verulumiani in an appendix.

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On 2/15/2024 at 3:49 AM, A Phoenix said:

THE IGNORANCE AND DELUSIONS OF ALEXANDER WAUGH

POST BY LAWRENCE GERALD UNDERNEATH THE VIDEO ‘Ben Jonson’s Discoveries Discovered!’ BY ALEXANDER WAUGH

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O60uYDKTqJ0&lc=UgyXRMj-S8rylzmz9R54AaABAg.A-ALiCz6u6SA-khxlGYki-

In the months following Francis Bacon’s death his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and quietly issued a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum. This rare and still virtually unknown work contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon, which his orthodox editors and biographers have simply glossed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare. Secret Bacon-Shakespeare Links - Bacon Verses, Shakespeare First Folio & The Stratford Monument

REPLY TO LAWRENCE GERALD BY ALEXANDER WAUGH:

The document you cite is not ‘virtually unknown’. Pretty well every researching authorship skeptic is aware of it; nor does it ‘portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym Shakespeare’ as you claim. That is a wild stretch. If you do not take my word for it you should at least read Baconian scholar, N. B. Cockburn’s, exhaustive study entitled ‘The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory made Sane’ in which he dismisses your claims as ‘a topic on which the Baconians, mistakenly, set great store’, taking each reference in turn and demonstrating clearly why his Baconian confreres are wrong (see pp. 713-716). The monotonous-voiced YouTube link you posted proves nothing. She was the one who refused my application to become a life member of the Francis Bacon Society. Her standard of scholarship is even feebler than that of Stanley Wells.

REPLY TO ALEXANDER WAUGH:

As stated, the Memoriae is virtually unknown. For reasons that should be obvious it is rarely referred to or discussed by orthodox Shakespeare scholars and is also unfamiliar to Shakespeare Authorship Doubters. Regarding your comments ‘pretty well every researching authorship skeptic is aware of it’: firstly, could you please provide evidence to support your statement; secondly, if by this you mean virtually every Oxfordians, et al, is aware of it or has heard of the title of the work, I assume that being aware of a work or having heard of its title passes for serious scholarship in Oxfordian circles. Or thirdly, could you please provide a list of say half-a-dozen Oxfordians who have thoroughly examined and critically evaluated the Memoriae, in fact, might you even direct me to one full-length book, or even a single detailed academic paper by any Oxfordian on the subject. 

You suggest that I/we read Baconian scholar, N. B. Cockburn’s, exhaustive study entitled The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory made Sane ‘in which he dismisses your claims as “a topic on which the Baconians, mistakenly, set great store”, taking each reference in turn and demonstrating clearly why his Baconian confreres are wrong (see pp. 713-716).’ Firstly, I am very familiar with N. B. Cockburn’s excellent work, but I have no doubt that Cockburn (or any other serious scholar) would not describe his three page discussion as exhaustive, not least because no work is, or ever can be exhaustive. There is a significant amount of material included in the 277-page work on the Memoriae by A. Phoenix published in 2024 not known to Cockburn in a work published twenty-six years earlier in 1998. In light of the new material with the benefit of the full scholarly apparatus supporting it, I think the fair, open-minded and judicious scholar we all know and admire N. B. Cockburn to have been, would most likely have taken time to revisit the Memoriae and after critically evaluating all the evidence and information with the additional benefit of four English translations, which would have probably led him to revise and amend his opinion.     

You refer to the monotonous-voiced YouTube link ‘which proves nothing’ by this I take it you mean the 26-minute video posted on YouTube. This unfortunately reveals another regrettable aspect that passes for Oxfordian scholarship. You show no evidence of having read the 277-page groundbreaking work by A. Phoenix, The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument published on 22 January 2024.  It seems that Oxfordians possess powers that elude Baconians and all other serious scholars, whereby not even having read a work, you somehow by some kind of divine or magical prowess, know what it contains and similarly without being aware of all the relevant, historical research, evidence, and facts, are able to ignore and dismiss it.  

If you had read the above full-length work with an open and impartial mindset you would be aware that the 32 verses in the Memoriae do collectively portray Bacon as a supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym Shakespeare. But here lies the rub. You are simply faced with two choices. You either accept the unmistakable import of the Memorie revealing and confirming that Bacon is the secret author of the Shakespeare works and the enormous implications which flow from it; or, choose to ignore, misrepresent or dismiss, a contemporary 1626 work which at a single devastating stroke demolishes your whole lifetime work pursuing the Oxfordian delusion, the Oxfordian equivalent of Turkeys voting for Christmas.   

Bizarrely, you state in reference to the ‘monotonous-voiced YouTube link’ that ‘She was the one who refused my application to become a life member of the Francis Bacon Society.’ Here your grasp of basic facts, misidentification, and chronology is beyond embarrassing, and to be honest, is frankly shocking. The ‘she’ who refused your application in 2020 is a completely different ‘she’ to the narrator of the 2024 video!    

Waugh concludes with: ‘Her standard of scholarship is even feebler than that of Stanley Wells’.

This statement reveals the full extent of the ignorance of Alexander Waugh and the Oxfordian movement, more or less as a whole, of which he is seen as a leading light, who I have no doubt is not aware of, and has certainly not read, the large body of works produced by A. Phoenix. 

In a little over three years this output includes 4 heavily researched and referenced full-length books, 32 heavily researched and referenced academic papers, amounting to several thousand pages, fifty-six videos, and more than 3,400 posts on B’Hive.    

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

https://www.youtube.com/@baconisshakespeare/videos

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/

 

To Lawrence

 

It would be remiss of us to let your riposte, your broadside, your lethal blow to that bastion of Oxfordian baloney, Alexander Waugh, to pass without comment.

You blew him out of the water. Remind me to never go bowling with you. Your strike ratio is out of my league. Seriously on behalf of all of us, very well done!

As of yesterday, no reply from Waughsie was forthcoming. 

 

P.S. I had to look up the meaning of the phrase "like turkeys voting for Christmas" as I'd not heard it before. Once I got your gist, I considered photoshopping waugh's head onto a turkey's body, but then I realised it would be an insult to turkeys everywhere.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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On 2/14/2024 at 5:49 PM, A Phoenix said:

THE IGNORANCE AND DELUSIONS OF ALEXANDER WAUGH

POST BY LAWRENCE GERALD UNDERNEATH THE VIDEO ‘Ben Jonson’s Discoveries Discovered!’ BY ALEXANDER WAUGH

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O60uYDKTqJ0&lc=UgyXRMj-S8rylzmz9R54AaABAg.A-ALiCz6u6SA-khxlGYki-

In the months following Francis Bacon’s death his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and quietly issued a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum. This rare and still virtually unknown work contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon, which his orthodox editors and biographers have simply glossed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare. Secret Bacon-Shakespeare Links - Bacon Verses, Shakespeare First Folio & The Stratford Monument

REPLY TO LAWRENCE GERALD BY ALEXANDER WAUGH:

The document you cite is not ‘virtually unknown’. Pretty well every researching authorship skeptic is aware of it; nor does it ‘portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym Shakespeare’ as you claim. That is a wild stretch. If you do not take my word for it you should at least read Baconian scholar, N. B. Cockburn’s, exhaustive study entitled ‘The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory made Sane’ in which he dismisses your claims as ‘a topic on which the Baconians, mistakenly, set great store’, taking each reference in turn and demonstrating clearly why his Baconian confreres are wrong (see pp. 713-716). The monotonous-voiced YouTube link you posted proves nothing. She was the one who refused my application to become a life member of the Francis Bacon Society. Her standard of scholarship is even feebler than that of Stanley Wells.

REPLY TO ALEXANDER WAUGH:

As stated, the Memoriae is virtually unknown. For reasons that should be obvious it is rarely referred to or discussed by orthodox Shakespeare scholars and is also unfamiliar to Shakespeare Authorship Doubters. Regarding your comments ‘pretty well every researching authorship skeptic is aware of it’: firstly, could you please provide evidence to support your statement; secondly, if by this you mean virtually every Oxfordians, et al, is aware of it or has heard of the title of the work, I assume that being aware of a work or having heard of its title passes for serious scholarship in Oxfordian circles. Or thirdly, could you please provide a list of say half-a-dozen Oxfordians who have thoroughly examined and critically evaluated the Memoriae, in fact, might you even direct me to one full-length book, or even a single detailed academic paper by any Oxfordian on the subject. 

You suggest that I/we read Baconian scholar, N. B. Cockburn’s, exhaustive study entitled The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory made Sane ‘in which he dismisses your claims as “a topic on which the Baconians, mistakenly, set great store”, taking each reference in turn and demonstrating clearly why his Baconian confreres are wrong (see pp. 713-716).’ Firstly, I am very familiar with N. B. Cockburn’s excellent work, but I have no doubt that Cockburn (or any other serious scholar) would not describe his three page discussion as exhaustive, not least because no work is, or ever can be exhaustive. There is a significant amount of material included in the 277-page work on the Memoriae by A. Phoenix published in 2024 not known to Cockburn in a work published twenty-six years earlier in 1998. In light of the new material with the benefit of the full scholarly apparatus supporting it, I think the fair, open-minded and judicious scholar we all know and admire N. B. Cockburn to have been, would most likely have taken time to revisit the Memoriae and after critically evaluating all the evidence and information with the additional benefit of four English translations, which would have probably led him to revise and amend his opinion.     

You refer to the monotonous-voiced YouTube link ‘which proves nothing’ by this I take it you mean the 26-minute video posted on YouTube. This unfortunately reveals another regrettable aspect that passes for Oxfordian scholarship. You show no evidence of having read the 277-page groundbreaking work by A. Phoenix, The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument published on 22 January 2024.  It seems that Oxfordians possess powers that elude Baconians and all other serious scholars, whereby not even having read a work, you somehow by some kind of divine or magical prowess, know what it contains and similarly without being aware of all the relevant, historical research, evidence, and facts, are able to ignore and dismiss it.  

If you had read the above full-length work with an open and impartial mindset you would be aware that the 32 verses in the Memoriae do collectively portray Bacon as a supreme poet and dramatist, the writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym Shakespeare. But here lies the rub. You are simply faced with two choices. You either accept the unmistakable import of the Memoriae revealing and confirming that Bacon is the secret author of the Shakespeare works and the enormous implications which flow from it; or, choose to ignore, misrepresent or dismiss, a contemporary 1626 work which at a single devastating stroke demolishes your whole lifetime work pursuing the Oxfordian delusion, the Oxfordian equivalent of Turkeys voting for Christmas.   

Bizarrely, you state in reference to the ‘monotonous-voiced YouTube link’ that ‘She was the one who refused my application to become a life member of the Francis Bacon Society.’ Here your grasp of basic facts, misidentification, and chronology is beyond embarrassing, and to be honest, is frankly shocking. The ‘she’ who refused your application in 2020 is a completely different ‘she’ to the narrator of the 2024 video!    

Waugh concludes with: ‘Her standard of scholarship is even feebler than that of Stanley Wells’.

This statement reveals the full extent of the ignorance of Alexander Waugh and the Oxfordian movement, more or less as a whole, of which he is seen as a leading light, who I have no doubt is not aware of, and has certainly not read, the large body of works produced by A. Phoenix. 

In a little over three years this output includes 4 heavily researched and referenced full-length books, 32 heavily researched and referenced academic papers, amounting to several thousand pages, fifty-six videos, and more than 3,400 posts on B’Hive.    

https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

https://www.youtube.com/@baconisshakespeare/videos

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/

So there's obviously this ongoing belief that has spread around that AP is one and the same person as narrates.  Again, for anyone reading from the outside, I can categorically confirm that they are a team, and AP is a man. 

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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6 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

To Lawrence

 

It would be remiss of us to let your riposte, your broadside, your lethal blow to that bastion of Oxfordian baloney, Alexander Waugh, to pass without comment.

You blew him out of the water. Remind me to never go bowling with you. Your strike ratio is out of my league. Seriously on behalf of all of us, very well done!

As of yesterday, no reply from Waughsie was forthcoming. 

 

P.S. I had to look up the meaning of the phrase "like turkeys voting for Christmas" as I'd not heard it before. Once I got your gist, I considered photoshopping waugh's head onto a turkey's body, but then I realised it would be an insult to turkeys everywhere.

 

 

 

 

 

Thank You Eric but credit should all be given to AP who I asked for support and he delivered the turkeys for christmas! Does this mean we can still go bowling sir?

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On 2/16/2024 at 1:49 PM, Christie Waldman said:

I posted a comment at the youtube page, and I saw it up, but the next time I looked, it was not there, so had apparently been taken down. What I said was that even the most fair-minded and judicious people can have blind spots, and that the real significance of N. B. Cockburn's 740-page book, The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Question Made Sane, was that he tried to cover the whole scope of the case for Bacon's authorship of Shakespeare--what he considered the chief points, as the case existed in 1998, in one book. I might add that, being a barrister, he probably gravitated more towards arguments that could be proven with concrete facts, as in a court of law, rather than towards opinion-based evidence. Even if he didn't say so explicitly, that could be one reason he put the Manes Verulumiani in an appendix.

Christie, if you do a Newest First on the Sort by logo your comment is still there.

Even "fair, open-minded and judicious scholars" may have blind spots. Reasonable minds can differ on matters of opinion. What British barrister N. B. Cockburn's book does in his 740-page book is try to set out fully the strongest points in the case for Bacon, as he saw them, 26 years ago. Cockburn considered only 4 of the 32 elegies in his appendix. I am surprised you were able to find a copy of Cockburn's book; it is so rare.  @alexanderwaugh7036 
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 11/7/2023 at 8:05 AM, A Phoenix said:

THE GENIUS OF SHAKESPEARE BY SIR JONATHAN BATE WIDELY SEEN AS THE HIGHEST ORTHODOX SHAKESPEARE/STRATFORDIAN AUTHORITY IN THE WORLD AND THE BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN CRYPTIC DEVICES ON PAGE 157 THE NUMBER REPRESENTING THE BROTHERHOOD OF THE ROSY CROSS.

The prolific and voluminous Sir Jonathan Bate is now widely regarded as the highest Stratfordian authority in the world. He was educated at Seven Oaks School where he was a contemporary of Jonathan Evans, Director General of MI5 (2007-13). He went to St Catherine’s College, Cambridge (the same university as Bacon) where he earned his PhD on ‘Shakespeare and the English Romantic Imagination’ and then became a Research Fellow at Harvard University founded in 1636 (most probably by Bacon’s Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood), the oldest university in the United States of America, first established by Bacon and his Rosicrucian Brotherhood at Jamestown, Virginia, three decades earlier, in 1607. He was a Fellow at Trinity Hall, Cambridge and afterwards appointed King Alfred Professor of English Literature at Liverpool University, before becoming Professor of Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature at the University of Warwick. In 2011 Professor Bate was elected Provost of Worcester College, Oxford and served as a Governor and a senior Board member of the Royal Shakespeare Company. He sits on the European Advisory Board of the Princeton University Press and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and Fellow of the British Academy. He is also the General Editor of the Internet Shakespeare Editions project-one of the most visited Shakespeare websites in the world. At various times Professor Bate has held visiting professorships at Yale University, the Huntington Library, which houses one of the most important Bacon collections in the world, and the Folger Shakespeare Library, which holds the world’s largest collection of printed works of Shakespeare and arguably the largest collection of printed works on Francis Bacon and the Bacon-Shakespeare Authorship Controversy.    

His impressive list of publications include Shakespeare and Ovid (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1993), The RSC Shakespeare: Complete Works (Macmillan, 2007: edited with Eric Rasmussen), Soul of the Age: The Life, Mind and World of William Shakespeare (Penguin Books, 2009), and The Genius of Shakespeare (London: Picador, 1997). In his ‘Acknowledgements’ at the back of The Genius of Shakespeare Professor Bate expresses his various debts of support and gratitude ‘The writing of this book was made possible by the award of a British Academy Research Readership, a visiting fellowship at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, and an Andrew Mellon Fellowship at the Huntingdon Library in San Marino, California’.1

In the preface Professor Bate tells his readers ‘a library devoted to him [Shakespeare] stands on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC a stone’s throw away from the legislature-where every other author has to make do with a niche in the vast Library of Congress [founded on the personal library of President Thomas Jefferson, believed by many to be linked to the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, based on Bacon’s system of memory, reason and imagination], the Bard of Avon has his special place across the road, the Folger Shakespeare Library.’2 A secret Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Institution.3 To which Professor Bate may also have added is equally only a stone’s throw from The Supreme Mother Council of the World, 330 Ancient And Accepted Rite of Freemasonry, at the heart of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic capital of United States of America.

In The Genius of Shakespeare he devotes a chapter to ‘The Authorship Controversy’:

'There is a mystery about the identity of William Shakespeare. The mystery is this: why should anyone doubt that he was William Shakespeare, the actor from Stratford-upon-Avon?

It is the first question which the professional Shakespearean is always asked in casual conversation outside the walls of the academy-who wrote the plays? When told of the hard core of evidence that the man from Stratford did so, people are surprised. Sometimes it is suspected that the academics are covering up a scandal…'4

In my experience most of the schoolmen of the second and third rank downwards do not often know what Shakespeare day of the week it is and therefore a vast historical conspiracy perpetrated down the centuries of world-wide proportions is light years beyond their limited comprehension. What the ordinary schoolmen do not know is the great Bacon-Shakespeare secret is reserved for their betters much higher up of exalted rank sublimely residing on an invisible Rosicrucian plain directing the hallowed walls of academia.

In The Genius of Shakespeare Professor Bate states 'the theory that it was Bacon failed to convince because the deduction of it depended upon elaborate cryptograms.'5 Leaving the reader with the impression that the Baconians had little or no other evidence supporting Bacon's authorship of the Shakespeare works!

The observant reader will have noticed that Professor Bate italicized 'it was Bacon' in a sentence in which there was absolutely no need to do so.

In an attempt to ridicule Baconian ciphers after stating that the 'chief device of the late-nineteenth-and early twentieth century Baconians was the cryptogram', Professor Bate presented an example taken from Ignatius Donnelly's The Great Cryptogram: Francis Bacon's Cipher in the so-called Shakespeare Plays.This is all stated in the open text. However, concealed in the text elsewhere in The Genius of Shakespeare for those with eyes to see is a cryptogram conveying the secret that Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is Shakespeare.  

In The Genius of Shakespeare Professor Bate begins his chapter 6 (3 plus 3: 33 Bacon in simple cipher) on page 157: 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher. The chapter is titled ‘The Original Genius’ and subtitled ‘The idea of genius’. The sentence which also constitutes the first paragraph reads ‘Consider the statement ‘Shakespeare was a genius’. Is this a fact or an opinion?’ The first printed line of it contains 56 letters: 56 Fr Bacon in simple cipher and the full sentence has 63 letters and carries four marks of punctuation: two quotation marks, one full stop and a question mark. This provides a total of 67 Francis in simple cipher. The title and the subtitle comprise 32 letters and one digit at the head of the page: 32+1=33 Bacon in simple cipher. Thus far we have a concealed cryptogram which reads Francis Bacon-Brother of the Rosy Cross.

Furthermore, it will be noted that the first sentence begins with ‘Consider’, which first three letters contain the second syllable of the name Bacon. If the eye strays further down the page, it will be noticed, the almost subliminal line ‘flashing into our minds’ is followed by a noticeably larger than usual gap between it and the beginning of the Hamlet quote ‘To be or not to be’. This citation is followed by citations from Macbeth ‘Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow’, As You Like it ‘All the world’s a stage’ and the equally famous line from The Tempest ‘Our Revels now are ended’. The phrase ‘To be or not to be’ is found in arguably the most metaphysical line in the whole of the Shakespeare canon. The truth as Bacon said, is the daughter of time not authority, and the hidden truth (as stated on the title page of New Atlantis; Land of the Rosicrucians) will be revealed after some time has passed, tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow and Bacon knew more than anyone, as do his Rosicrucian Brotherhood, that ‘All the world’s a stage’; some of whom masquerade as authoritative Shakespeare or Stratfordian scholars.

It is often thought the line ‘Our revels now are ended’ represents his departure to the world-with his secret identity as the poet Shakespeare to be discovered at a later date, after some considerable time had passed. After this considerable passage of time let us see if we can find him again on the page before us. If we use the same secret method of delivery that Bacon employed at the end of The Rape of Lucrece and draw a line starting from the right of the syllable ‘Con’ beginning the first paragraph through the capital letter A in ‘And’ (line 😎down through the ‘b’ of the multi-layered meaning of the line ‘To be or not to be’ on to the ‘f’, ending the apposite word ‘proof’, upwards we read the letters yielding the name F Bacon, ‘The Original Genius’ of Shakespeare, that taken together provides us with the concealed cryptogram Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is Shakespeare.

1. Jonathan Bate, The Genius of Shakespeare (London: Picador, 1997), p. 371.

2. Ibid., p. VII.

3. A. Phoenix, ‘The Fraudulent Friedmans: The Bacon Ciphers in the Shakespeare

    Works’ (2022), pp. 1-340, esp. pp. 172-225, available at www.sirbacon.org.

4. Jonathan Bate, The Genius of Shakespeare (London: Picador, 1997), p. 65.

5. Ibid., p. 102.

6. Ibid., pp. 89-90.

JB.png

 

"Jonathan Bate should change the spelling of his last name to Bait. Jonathan Bait

The only thing Jonathan Bate catches with his worms is the drift of mediocrity." - Antonine Lakosh

bait /bāt/

noun

  1. Food or other lure placed on a hook or in a trap and used in the taking of fish, birds, or other animals.
  2. Something, such as a worm, used for this purpose.
  3. An enticement, temptation, or provocation.
    "He did not take the bait by responding to the taunt and getting drawn into an argument."
 
On 11/14/2023 at 9:15 AM, A Phoenix said:

Charles Beauclerk A Descendant of Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, the Founder and President of the De Vere Society

The leading light of the Oxfordian movement Charles Francis Topham de Vere Beauclerk (b. 1965), Earl of Burford, is heir apparent to Murray Beauclerk, fourteenth Duke of St Albans and is descended from Charles Beauclerk, the first Duke of St. Albans, the illegitimate son of Charles II and Nell Gwynne. He was educated at Eton College and Sherborne school before moving up to Hertford College, Oxford. Through his father he is related to Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford.

He is the Founder and President of the De Vere Society, former President of the Shakespeare Oxford Society, and trustee of the Shakespeare Authorship Trust.  

He founded The De Vere Society at Hertford College, Oxford in 1986. According to its own website:

The De Vere Society is dedicated to an appreciation and celebration of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford (1550–1604) as the true genius behind the literary pseudonym ‘William Shakespeare’. Founded at Oxford University in 1986 the Society organises tours, theatre trips, lectures, forums and social events; it publishes essays, articles, reviews, videos, audio recordings and books, and promotes research around the world. Anyone who enjoys the works of Shakespeare and is intrigued by the greatest of all authorship mysteries is welcome to join.

Among its patrons is the famous actor Sir Derek Jacobi with Alexander Waugh Chairman and a member of its Board of Trustees.

After spending more than two decades researching the Shakespeare Authorship Question in 2010 Beauclerk published Shakespeares Lost Kingdom: The True History of Shakespeare and Elizabeth. In a work whose central theme is the true identity of our immortal poet and dramatist Shakespeare, Beauclerk only once refers to Francis Bacon and the Baconians in the following passage here quoted in its entirety:

When serious and persistent doubts over the identity of Shakespeare began to appear in print in the mid-nineteenth century, the search was on for the man whose life and learning matched the high culture of the Shakespeare canon. The Victorians promoted Francis Bacon, who held the field for over sixty years. Baconians, as they are now called, were the first to realize the significance of the royal theme in Shakespeare, but their reliance on fantastically complex ciphers, as witness Minnesota congressman Ignatius Donnelly’s The Great Cryptogram (1888), stretched credulity. Then, in November 1918, a sealed envelope was entrusted to Sir Frederick Kenyon, head librarian at the British Museum, by an English schoolmaster with the provocative name of J. Thomas Looney (1870-1944). Inside was a statement of his discovery of the true identity of the man who wrote under the pen name William Shakespeare [i.e., Edward de Vere, seventeenth Earl of Oxford].1

The mercifully brief passage contains a series of misstatements of fact. As the candidate for the true authorship of the Shakespeare poems and plays Francis Bacon and the Baconians did not hold sway for over sixty years a terminus ad quem determined by the publication of J. Thomas Looney’s letter to Sir Frederick Kenyon in 1918 followed by the publication of his Shakespeare Identified first printed in 1920. It took another half-a century before the Oxfordian movement started to gain any real traction and in the interim it is reported that at one time it had less than fifty supporters before their support began to slowly but steadily rise from the 1970s during which time the Baconians were still the dominant force producing numerous books and The Francis Bacon Society literally hundreds of articles in support of his authorship in its journal Baconiana. 

This misleading assertion served as a prelude to the incorrect and absurd misrepresentation of the overwhelming mountainous and irrefutable evidence revealing and confirming that Bacon is the secret author of the Shakespeare works, when Beauclerk misinformed that the Baconians reliance on fantastically complex ciphers stretched credulity, citing the example of The Great Cryptogram by Ignatius Donnelly published more than a hundred and thirty years ago. This simply risible and ludicrous nonsense conveyed the misleading impression to the Oxfordian flock that a larger part of the Baconian position rested upon this and little else. Whereas on a point of fact there is not a single living Baconian who rests his or her support for Lord Bacon’s authorship of the Shakespeare works on fantastically complex ciphers put forward by Ignatius Donnelly.

Rather the evidence advanced and relied upon by Baconian scholars is wide and various and covers all aspects of historical, evidential and factual critical inquiry into Bacon’s authorship of the Shakespeare works, built upon numerous primary manuscript and printed documents, regarding which I provide the following five examples:

1] FRANCIS BACON’S PRIVATE NOTEBOOK THE PROMUS OF FORMULARIES AND ELEGANCIES A MAJOR SOURCE FOR HIS SHAKESPEARE POEMS AND PLAYS

In ordinary circumstances this contemporary manuscript document named the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies would be well known to every Bacon and Shakespeare scholar and student of English literature around the world. Bacon’s unique private notebook held at the British Library contains a total of 51 leaves numbered pages 83 to 132 all written (apart from some French proverbs) in his own hand. The Folio numbered 85 is headed ‘Promus’ and beneath it appears the date ‘Dec. 5, 1594’ with the Folio numbered 114 headed ‘Formularies Promus’ carrying the date ‘27 Jan. 1595’ (i.e., January 1596). It contains 1655 entries jotted down as an aid to his memory. The entries include single words, phrases, lines, turns of speech, metaphors, similes, aphorisms, and various moral and philosophical observations. These include entries drawn from the Bible; Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, and English proverbs; and lines and verses from classical poets and dramatists, among them, Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence. It is the Source of several hundred resemblances, correspondences and parallels found throughout his Shakespeare poems and plays.2

2] FRANCIS BACON’S OWN COLLECTION OF MSS KNOWN AS THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT ORIGINALLY CONTAINING HIS TWO SHAKESPEARE PLAYS RICHARD II AND RICHARD III

The Bacon collection of manuscripts hitherto known as The Northumberland Manuscript contains various writings by Bacon, comprising letters, essays, religio-political treatises, dramatic devices and originally held two of his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III. 

All the evidence makes tolerably certain that no part of the manuscript was written after c.1596-7. The precise dating of the manuscript is not merely some historical curiosity. The precision of the date is of the most manifest importance for the very simple reason that in 1597 William Shakespeare was not publicly known as a dramatic author. The pseudonym first appeared on the 1598 quarto edition of Loves Labours Lost the same year it appeared on the title pages of the quartos of Richard II and Richard III, most probably printed from the manuscripts that were originally part of this Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript.

In addition to originally having held two of Bacon’s Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III, the outer cover of his collection of manuscripts contains references and links to his narrative Shakespeare poem The Rape of Lucrece and another three of his Shakespeare plays Loves Labours Lost, Romeo and Juliet & The Merchant of Venice. This is moreover the only manuscript where the names Bacon and Shakespeare appear together in a contemporary document. Various forms of his name Bacon and Francis Bacon and pseudonym Shakespeare and William Shakespeare are scribbled all over its outer cover on around twenty occasions. Above the entry for his Shakespeare play Richard II appears the entry ‘By Mr. ffrauncis William Shakespeare’, and further down the word ‘Your’ is twice written across his pseudonym William Shakespeare-so it reads ‘Your William Shakespeare’. As if to emphasise this entry a second occurrence of the name ‘ffrauncis’ is written upside down above the first ‘ffrauncis’ thus reading from left to right ‘ffrauncis William Shakespeare’. Below the entry for ‘Rychard the second’, and above the entry for ‘Rychard the third’, appears his name ‘ffrauncis’ and to the left ‘Bacon’ and the right ‘Shakespeare’. Below at the bottom of the outer cover his pseudonym ‘William Shakespeare’ is repeated numerous times, and as if to emphasise one more time Bacon is Shakespeare, we are met with the possessive entry ‘your William Shakespeare’.3

3] THE SO-CALLED ‘DERING’ MANUSCRIPT OF HENRY IV THE UNIQUE AND EARLIEST KNOWN SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (c. 1596) ORIGINATING FROM BACON’S LITERARY WORKSHOP AND CORRECTED IN HIS OWN HAND

It is little known to virtually all Shakespeare scholars, the ordinary schoolmen, and the rest of the world that there exists an early manuscript version of the play Henry IV. This manuscript is the earliest extant manuscript of a Shakespeare play ever discovered.

This manuscript was discovered in 1844 preserved in the collection of the eighth Baronet Sir Edward Dering (1807-96) at Surrenden Hall near Pluckley in Kent. It had previously formed part of the library of the first Sir Edward Dering (1598-1644), an antiquarian with an interest in literature and drama, named after his uncle the Puritan preacher Edward Dering patronised by the Cooke sisters Lady Anne Cooke Bacon, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell, Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil and Lady Cooke Killigrew. The relatively obscure Sir Edward Dering (1598-1644) about whose early life very little is known was-here revealed for the first time-a close friend and relative (twice over) of the author of Henry IV Francis Bacon.

The so-called Dering manuscript is a single-five act Shakespeare play of Henry IV and is earlier than the first printed quarto of The Historie of Henrie the fourth issued in 1598 and the quarto edition of The Second part of Henrie the fourth printed in 1600. The MS represents the play as Bacon originally composed it when it was one play and not two before developing his original version into two separate parts. Furthermore, we can be reasonably precise regarding the date of the manuscript. It is widely agreed Henry IV followed closely upon Richard II as not only is Henry IV next chronologically its predecessor Richard II clearly points to a sequel. The earlier Richard II is believed to date to around late 1595 or early 1596, and Henry IV was probably composed shortly after, sometime in 1596.

The so-called corrector’s hand in the so-called Dering manuscript is Bacon’s own cramped hand, as one would expect, from the author of the play.4

4] THE 1623 SHAKESPEARE FIRST FOLIO

On 8 November 1623 Edward Blount and Isaac Jaggard entered on the Stationers’ Register sixteen Shakespeare plays which had not been previously published. Another twenty previously published plays were added giving a total of thirty-six plays in the First Folio therein divided into Comedies, Histories and Tragedies, in an enormous volume of more than nine hundred pages, representing the greatest secular publication in the history of English literature, whose untold impact around the world over the last four hundred year has never been fully understood and thus never fully told. 

On its 400th anniversary a recent work entitled The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion uncovers and reveals unknown and untold secrets about the greatest work of literature in the history of humankind. For the first time, it brings forth the hidden connections of its author Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood with all the key members involved in its production, printing, and publication. His hidden relationships with its printers William and Isaac Jaggard, and the other members of the First Folio consortium, John Smethwick, William Aspley, and its publisher Edward Blount.

It is almost universally unknown that its dedicatee William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke was at the time of its dedication Grand Master of England, one of half of the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’, with his brother Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, whose joint open and hidden relationships with Bacon went back decades. The other critical member in the production of the 1623 First Folio was its editor and contributor of its two verses Ben Jonson who at the time the First Folio was making its way through the Jaggard printing presses was living with Bacon at Gorhambury, where he was at the heart of the secret plans for bringing together this vast and complex enterprise.

The Droeshout engraving on the title page of the most famous secular work in English history is iconic and recognised the world over as the contemporary face of William Shakespeare the greatest poet and dramatist of all time. In strikingly marked contrast virtually nothing is known about Martin Droeshout the draughtsman responsible for the most recognisable literary image since time immemorial. A remarkable level of secrecy still surrounds his private life, friends and the social and professional circles he moved in, even though he self-evidently knew some of the most important figures in Jacobean England and moved in the highest circles of his times. This man who for the first thirty-three years of his life lived in the heart of London has scarcely left any documentary trace of his existence akin to him having been deliberately expunged from the records. To the present day his whole life is completely shrouded in secrecy and mystery. The key reason is Martin Droeshout and the famous/infamous Droeshout engraving on the title page of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is a mask behind which its concealed author Francis Bacon is hidden in plain sight, which when lifted reveals the truth behind the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion and ludibrium that the semi-illiterate William Shakspere of Stratford was the author of the greatest literature in the history of the world, that at a single devastating stroke brings the whole Stratfordian fiction crashing to the ground.

For the first time The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion conveys an explosive secret in making known the concealed and hidden relationship between Francis Bacon and Martin Droeshout which has been suppressed for the last four hundred years. Their secret relationship is encapsulated in an earlier Droeshout engraving titled Doctor Panurgus (c. 1621) wherein one of its central figures is a depiction of Francis Bacon replete with a series of clues and indicators to confirm it.

The figure of Bacon in the Dr Panurgus engraving by Droeshout dating from the early 1620s is drawn from the life, that points to Bacon sitting for it at Gorhambury. The complex engraving has clearly been very carefully planned out and must have involved Bacon giving Droeshout instructions and further directions that over a period of time necessitated numerous revision and amendments, not unlike the Droeshout in the First Folio, which exists in three known states, showing close attention to minor details as well as slight changes made to various aspects of it. This process was all taking place around the time Bacon was planning and preparing his Shakespeare plays for the Jaggard printing house during the years 1621 to 1623 when it is likely that Droeshout made numerous visits to see Bacon at his country estate at Gorhambury where he was most likely residing for periods with Bacon and Ben Jonson as part of his entourage of good pens and other artists that made up his literary workshop.  

It also lifts the veil of secrecy surrounding the hitherto unknown relationships between Francis Bacon and the other little-known figures Hugh Holland, James Mabbe and Leonard Digges who contributed verses to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Particularly, Bacon’s relationship with Leonard Digges, whose own father Sir Nicholas Bacon was the special patron of his grandfather and father Leonard Digges and Thomas Digges, the poet whose verse prefixed to the Folio refers to the Stratford Monument, which is adorned with Rosicrucian-Freemasonic symbols and Baconian ciphers, secretly commissioned by Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

In addition to all the above cryptic devices secretly inserted by Bacon in the Shakespeare First Folio there are also many remarkable and astonishing references and allusions to himself and members of the Bacon family, which for four hundred years have remained unfamiliar or unknown to the ordinary schoolmen, the casual student, and effectively the rest of the world. These include references and allusions to himself in several different plays where the character is in some instances named Francis and similarly where characters are named after his three brothers Sir Nicholas Bacon, Sir Nathaniel Bacon, and Anthony Bacon. Similarly in the First Folio there are references and allusions to his father and mother Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Cooke Bacon, her three sisters Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell and her husband John, Lord Russell, Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil and her husband William Cecil, Lord Burghley, as well as their offspring (Bacon’s cousins) Thomas Posthumous Hoby and Sir Robert Cecil, and the son of their brother William Cooke, named after his father, Bacon’s other cousin, known as William Cooke of Highnam Court in Gloucester.5 

5] The Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (1626) containing 32 Latin verses cryptically conveying Bacon is Shakespeare

In the months following the death of Francis Bacon to the world his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and published a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum, otheriwse known as the Manes Verulamiani. This rare volume contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon which his orthodox biographers and editors have simply passed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare.  

The Church of England clergymen Dr William Rawley knew the truth and secrets of the concealed and hidden life of whom the world and posterity know as Francis Bacon. On 22 January 1600 the twelve-year-old William Rawley was admitted bible-clerk of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge where he graduated BA in 1605 and MA in 1608 and was made elector tutor on 19 March 1610. He took his holy orders in April 1611 and in December 1612 he was instituted by the university to the rectory of St Michael’s in Bowthorpe, Norfolk. He was soon after introduced to Lord Bacon whose influence resulted in Corpus Christi College bestowing on Rawley the rectory of Landbeach in 1616. By this time Dr Rawley was already chaplain and ‘Amanuensis, or dayly instrument’ to Bacon assisting him, as he tells us, ‘in the composing, of his Works, for many years together; Especially, in his writing Time; I conceived, that no Man, could pretend a better Interest, or Claim, to the ordering of them, after his Death, then my self.’ He lived with Bacon for the last ten years of his known life (1616-26) and was one of his good pens residing at Gorhambury with the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson when the Shakespeare First Folio was working its way through the Jaggard family printing presses.

In the final elegy Bacon’s inward friend, the poet and dramatist Thomas Randolph, one of the sons of Ben Jonson, refers to Bacon as Quirinus, strikingly pointing to the fact that Bacon is our secret supreme poet and dramatist, Shakespeare:

See! how plentiful the flood! I acknowledge these for genuine Muses and their tears. One Helicon will scarce equal them; Parnassus, not covered by Deucalion’s flood, will, wonderful to say, be hidden beneath these waters...When he perceived that the arts were held by no roots, and like seed scattered on the surface of the soil were withering away, he taught the Pegasean arts to grow, as grew the spear of Quirinus [Spear/Spearman; i.e., Shakespeare] swiftly into a laurel tree. Therefore since he has taught the Heliconian goddesses to flourish no lapse of ages shall dim his glory. The ardour of his noble heart could bear no longer that you, divine Minerva [Pallas Athena the Shaker of the Spear who wore a helmet which rendered her invisible], should be despised. His godlike pen restored your wonted honour and as another Apollo [leader of the Nine Muses presiding over the different kinds of poetry and liberal arts] dispelled the clouds that hid you.

                                             Thomas Randolph, Trinity College.6

 

1. Charles Beauclerk, Shakespeares Lost Kingdom: The True History of Shakespeare and Elizabeth (New York: Grove Press, 2010), pp. 6-7.   

2. C. M. Pott, The Promus Of Formularies And Elegancies (Being Private Notes, circ. 1594, hitherto unpublished) By Francis Bacon Illustrated And Elucidated By Passages From Shakespeare (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1883); N. B. Cockburn, The Bacon Shakespeare Question (Guildford and Kings Lynn: Biddles Limited,1998), pp. 509-47; A. Phoenix, ‘Francis Bacon's Private Manuscript Notebook (Known as the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies) The Source of Several Hundred Resemblances, Correspondences and Parallels Found Throughout his Shakespeare Poems and Plays, (2023), pp. 1-133.

3. James Spedding, A Conference Of Pleasure, Composed For Some Festive Occasion About The Year 1592 By Francis Bacon. Edited, From A Manuscript Belonging To The Duke Of Northumberland (London: Whittingham an Wilkins, 1870); Frank J. Burgoyne, Collotype Facsimile & Type Transcript Of An Elizabethan Manuscript Preserved at Alnwick Castle, Northumberland (Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904); A. Phoenix, The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (Hitherto known as the Northumberland Manuscript) which originally Contained Copies of his Shakespeare Plays Richard II and Richard III (2022).

4. A. Phoenix, ‘Francis Bacon and the so-called ‘Dering’ Manuscript of Henry IV, the Unique and Earliest Known Manuscript of a Shakespeare play: or the Holy Grail of Shakespeare Scholarship a Shakespeare Manuscript (c.1596) Originating from Bacon’s Literary Workshop and Corrected in his Hand’ (2022), pp. 1-126.

5. A. Phoenix, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion (2023).

6. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio,
Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum
(Londini: In Officina Johannis Haviland, 1626); W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950); A. Phoenix,
The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-two Verses Dedicated to Francis Bacon our Shakespeare, the First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument (soon to be published on 1 January 1624).

 

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