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Another Rare, Sensational, and Virtually Unknown Image of Francis Bacon & William Shakspere


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Another Rare, Sensational, and Virtually Unknown Image of Francis Bacon & William Shakspere

Another Rare, Sensational, and Virtually Unknown Image of Francis Bacon & William ShakspereThe second Rosicrucian manifesto the Confessio Fraternitatis published in 1615 the year before the death of William Shakspere of Stratford, contains a piece of devastating information not ever mentioned by Stratfordian authorities, orthodox Shakespeare biographers, editors or commentators. Its secret anonymous author Bacon points out how easily the so-called learned or learned fools, and the rest of the credulous world, are easily deceived with enigmas and illusions. One of them being of his own creation, which has misled and beguiled the sleepy universities and academia around the globe for centuries: 

For conclusion of our Confession we must earnestly admonish you, that you cast away, if not all, yet most of the worthless books of pseudo chymists, to whom it is a jest to apply the Most Holy Trinity to vain things, or to deceive men with monstrous symbols and enigmas, or to profit by the curiosity of the credulous; our age doth produce many such, one of the greatest being a stage-player, a man with sufficient ingenuity for imposition; [my italics] such doth the enemy of human welfare mingle among the good seed, thereby to make the truth more difficult to be believed, which in herself is simple and naked, while falshood is proud, haughty, and coloured with a lustre of seeming godly and humane wisdom.1

                OUR AGE DOTH PRODUCE MANY SUCH, ONE OF THE GREATEST BEING A STAGE-PLAYER,

A MAN WITH SUFFICIENT INGENUITY FOR IMPOSTION

The following year 1616, the year in which Bacon’s literary mask William Shakspere died, there was published at Amsterdam a very rare Rosicrucian work with the following title page ‘Cornelii Giselberti Plempii Amsterodamun Monogrammon’. The enigmatic work contains fifty illustrations with Latin verses beneath them. Emblem 1 sees Fortune standing upon a globe (an allusion to the Globe Theatre) with one hand pushing from the pinnacle of Fame a man dressed as an actor with a feather in his hat; and the other, raising up a man wearing the familiar Bacon hat (in nearly all portraits he is presented wearing the hat of the Grand Master of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood), whose face is hidden. Confirmation it is Bacon comes in the form of the initial letters from the ninth line in the verse ‘Obscaenumque nimis crepuit, Fortuna Batavis Appellanda’, an anagram which yields F BACON.2

A work intimately related to the Plempii edition was also set forth by Bacon and his Rosicrucian Brotherhood entitled Speculum Sophicum Rhodo-Stauroticum published (possibly at Frankfurt) in 1618 without any place of publication on its title page, or the name of its printer or publisher, by Theophilus Schweighardt, believed by some to be one Daniel Mogling.3 Its frontispiece is of the greatest importance. It depicts the College or Temple of the Rosy Cross above which is an inscription ‘Collegium Fraternitatis’ and the ‘Fama’ (with the date 1618), a clear reference to the first Rosicrucian manifesto Fama Fraternitatis published at Cassel in 1614. On either side of its door there is a Rose and Cross, well-known emblems of the Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross. From the side of our Rosicrucian Temple there appears a large trumpet underneath which are the letters ‘C. R. F.’, perhaps standing for ‘Christian Rosencreutz Frater’ or Francis Rosy Cross, i.e., Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross. The secret anonymous authorship of the two Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama and Confessio was cryptically revealed by Dr John Wilkins, the warden of Wadham College, Oxford, Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, and afterwards first Secretary of the Rosicrucian Royal Society in his work entitled Mathematicall Magick. While discussing subterranean lamps the Baconian disciple and Rosicrucian Brother Dr Wilkins makes the following remarkable statement:

Such a lamp is likewise related to be seen in the sepulchre of Francis Rosicrosse, as is more largely expressed in the confession of that fraternity.4

The lamp is referred to in the Fama not the Confessio, an artful Rosicrucian device employed by Dr Wilkins to draw attention to a passage in which the Christian name of Bacon, ‘Francis’ is directly aligned with the Brotherhood of the Rose Cross, ‘Rosicrosse’, in relation to its two manifestos at once indicating two profound secrets: Francis Bacon was the Founding Father of the Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross and the concealed author of its two manifestos the Fama and the Confessio. 

On the frontispiece it will be noticed that on either side of The Temple of the Rosy Cross are two figures one wearing a tall hat with a large Rose being hauled out of a dark well where he was previously hidden and another figure falling of a high rock. These two figures represent the same two figures in the Plempii Emblem where the identity of Francis Bacon is confirmed by the anagram in its verse where the other dressed as an actor represents the literary impostor William Shakspere,5 alluded to in the second Rosicrucian manifesto the Confessio Fraternitatis.

The first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis is again alluded to in the frontispiece via the wings protruding outwards near the top of The Temple of the Rosy Cross, underneath the ‘Fama’  which itself concludes with the words ‘Sub Umbra Alarum Tuarum Jehova’ (Under the shadow of thy wings, Jehova).

When the Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Royal Society was formed in the second half of the seventeenth century with Dr Wilkins appointed its first secretary, its official historian Thomas Sprat published The History of the Royal Society with a very important  frontispiece. At its centre it depicts a bust of King Charles II, with William Brouncker, its first president to his right, and on his left Francis Bacon, the Founding Father of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood. Its prime mover Lord Bacon is sitting under the prominent winged angel holding a trumpet which alludes to his first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis that as stated above ends with ‘Sub Umbra Alarum Tuarum Jehova’ (‘under the shadow of Jehova’s wings’) and Speculum Sophicum Rhodo-Stauroticum where he and his literary mask William Shakspere appear on its frontispiece cryptically conveying that Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is the secret concealed author of the Shakespeare works.

1. A. E. Waite, The Real History of the Rosicrucians founded on their own Manifestos, and on facts and documents collected from the writings of Initiated Brethren (London: George Redway, 1887), p. 96.

2. Cornelii Giselberti Plempii, Amsterodamun Monogrammon (Amsterodami Apud Ioannem Walschardum, 1616), Emblem 1.

3. Theophilus Schweighardt, pseud., Speculum Sophicum Rhodo-Stauroticum, Das ist: Weilauffige Entdeckung des  Collegii und axiomatum von sondern erleuchten Fraternitet Christi Rosen Creutz (1618), frontispiece. 

4. John Wilkins, Mathematicall Magick Or, The Wonders That May be performed by Mechanical Geometry (London: printed by M. F. for Sa. Gellibrand, 1648), pp. 236-37.

5. T. D. Bokenham, Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians (no date or place of publication), p. 1.

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EDIT:

Not so much as edit as a rewrite...

LOVE IT!

https://archive.org/details/corneliigiselber00plem/page/123/mode/1up

The first letters left flush E F O O O Q are 69 Simple cipher and 33 Short cipher. (33 is the Simple cipher for BACON).

Then the first letters indented P I R E A V are 67 Simple cipher. (67 is the Simple cipher for FRANCIS).

E F O O O Q  P I R E A V are 136 Simple cipher which is the same as BACON SHAKESPEARE.

Thank you, A. Phoenix! 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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Hi A Phoenix,

Thank you for this masterful presentation !❤️

As a reminder, regarding the Castle of the Rosi Crosse, we also have a link with Ben Jonson through his Masque :

THE FORTUNATE ISLES, AND THEIR UNION design'd for the Court on the Twelfh night 1626.

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n387/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater 

image.png.9f7be3374b2b1cea816a7f9d8e6cfd43.png

image.png.840142bdb9f614fa01a14e733bf8d2b7.png

image.png.dcb30de7e9c58cca201fdf192ccce556.png

33 words F. BA (See) O

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15 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Rob,

Twelfth Night is on the 6th January and Lord Bacon's recorded death is 9th April 1626 so according to our interpretation he would have been alive at the time. However, it could be interpreted the other way.

Thank you, I'll keep both concepts open when I read the work. To me it has a lot of Bacon suggestions. But I admit, I cannot read anything and not see Bacon.

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The emblem book is curious with plenty of misnumbered pages and emblems with images like Bacon. For example; page 156 and emblem 32, then page 157 and emblem 43 below. Page 157 should be Emblem 33.

Is there an English translation?

https://archive.org/details/corneliigiselber00plem/page/156/mode/1up

image.png.6c0cba764bf6d63cafd694b424abdc41.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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