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Spearshaker – a Film about the Secret Life of Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PLAYS

OTHELLO

The subjects explored by Bacon in his essays Of Envy, Of Suspicion, Of Cunning, Of Ambition, Of Anger and Of Revenge similarly inform the key themes running throughout Othello. The ambitious Iago frustrated his career is being blocked when Othello names Cassio his lieutenant becomes the personification of evil. Through his cunning and lies he pours suspicion into the ears of Othello with his false insinuations against Desdemona driven by his anger towards Othello. He in turn directs his jealous anger toward his wife Desdemona, culminating in him strangling her to death. The envy Iago harbours for Cassio drives him to murder and when his wife reveals the truth about the handkerchief, he takes his revenge and stabs her to death. When Othello finally realises that he has been duped he likewise takes his revenge and stabs Iago before killing himself.

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The Tragedy of Othello written in 1604 first appeared in print in a quarto edition in 1622 with another version of Othello appearing the following year in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Astonishingly, a comparative examination of the 1622 quarto edition and the version of Othello in the First Folio reveals that the latter is 160 lines longer and differs in wording in more than a thousand instances. Of course, the concealed author of Othello was still very much alive in 1622 and 1623, which surely to any rational person is of some critical importance!
 

Hi A.P.

Could you please explain how we know that Othello was written in 1604, but not published until 1622/23. Also, how do Stratfordians explain the expanded and revised text in the F.F.?

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Hi Eric, 

Othello was performed before James I in the Banqueting House at Whitehall on 1 November 1604. It is believed it was written earlier the same year although there is always the possibility it was written late in 1603 after Richard Knowles's History of the Turks published sometime after 30 September 1603, from where it is believed some information was taken from it for the play.

Orthodox scholars either pass over in silence the differences between the 1622 quarto edition and the 1623 Folio version, or try and account for it by saying the omissions in the 1622 quarto represents cuts in the acting version, or it was set up from a transcript of a prompt-book for the play, or the Folio version was based upon either a copy of the 1622 quarto which had been collated with prompt-book, or a copy of the 1622 quarto was corrected against a fair copy of the play.

What they can't say (for obvious reasons) is that the reason the First Folio version is 160 lines longer with more than 1,OOO (ONE THOUSAND) plus differences in wording from the 1622 quarto is the true author of Othello was well and truly alive in 1622 and 1623, some six or seven years after Willy from Stratford had shuffled off this mortal coil! 

 

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8 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Phoenixes

You packed a whole lifetime into 7-8 //graphs.

I feel like we should be voting on who will play who in the Spearshaker major motion picture!

Jono is Bacon, of course.

His brother Anthony needs to be a similar age. That rules out actors I know. LOL

The lucky actress who plays Elizabeth will land her best role ever and win several awards.

Jono wil get the big actor prize, A.Phoenix the creator prizes. 🙂

Ben Jonson? Heavy set, fun with a jolly presence. Super intelligent.

OMG, who will play Willy?? LOL

 

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1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

"OMG, who will play Willy?? LOL"

Adam Shulman ! 😉 

Yann! You are ever and always the most brilliant adventurer who pierces the veil for all of us!

https://www.yourtango.com/entertainment/anne-hathaway-adam-shulman-reincarnated-versions-william-shakespeare-wife

After Hathaway married actor Adam Shulman in 2012, many couldn't help but see a strange resemblance between Shakespeare and Shulman. The theory claims that Shulman, a jewelry designer, is a reincarnation of the famous English playwright, due to Shulman’s resemblance to Shakespeare and the fact that his wife’s name was also Anne Hathaway.

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So we have Bacon (Jono), Elizabeth (Julia Garner), and Willy (Adam Shulman).

Nicholas and Lady Anne Bacon? They'd have to be older, and probably already award winners for those roles.

John Dee??

 

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PEOPLE
JAMES I
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It is widely believed that Queen Elizabeth never named her heir but what if she did name her first born Tudor heir Francis Bacon? Sir Robert Cecil, Bacon’s cousin had a long held enmity for Bacon with him jostling for power especially since the death of his father William Cecil, Lord Burghley a few years earlier. Robert Cecil knew the secret of Bacon’s birth and was with Queen Elizabeth in her last hours as she heartbrokenly cried out for Dudley and bewailed the death of her youngest Tudor son Robert, Earl of Essex. It was Cecil’s word only that she named James I of Scotland as her heir and Cecil had every reason to not want Francis acknowledged.
 
When James succeeded the throne, he too knew of Bacon’s real identity and was concerned and suspicious regarding Bacon’s intentions. Bacon had long given up his claim to the throne and sought to reassure James that this was the case and he merely wanted to serve the King and state in any way he could. James recognised that as a brilliant writer, lawyer and Member of Parliament, Bacon could be a very useful ally in his quest to unite Scotland and England.
 
Bacon was knighted (along with hundreds of others) shortly after James’ accession. After Bacon’s marriage to a commoner Alice Barnham in 1606 he started to receive all the legal offices and titles that Queen Elizabeth had steadfastly denied him. This was seen as his recompense for ensuring that he never pursued his claim to the throne.
 
James was a most strange and contrary monarch. Bacon initially had high hopes that James would promote Bacon’s plans for his great advancement of learning but it soon transpired that his hatred of Parliament and his over indulgence of his favourites made him a weak and corrupt monarch. The union of Scotland and England and the colonisation of the United States of America were both conceived in his reign but it was Francis Bacon who was the guiding light and prime mover behind these far reaching initiatives.
 
King James and his great favourite the Duke of Buckingham were heavily involved in securing royal grants and monopolies for friends and family and Buckingham excessively squandered public funds for his own extravagant lifestyle, accepting gifts and bribes for preferments. Public opinion turned against Buckingham and by extension the King and there were public enquiries into corruption at the highest level. Bacon had long warned them both about their excessive behaviour but in the end it was he who was sacrificed in order to deflect the spotlight away from the King and his lover and favourite Buckingham.
 
In his Shakespeare works, Bacon’s preoccupation with bastardy, kingship, civil war, succession and history was a natural enough interest for the historical people he wrote of were actually his ancestors. When Bacon was about to be sacrificed politically to protect the King and his favourite Buckingham he reminded James ‘I wish that as I am the first, so I may be the last of sacrifices in your times.’ He was of course literally a political sacrifice but also Bacon alludes to the fact that he had already sacrificed his whole birthright as rightful Tudor heir to James. ‘I am the first’ is an allusion to the fact that he should have been Francis I of England.
 
 
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PLAYS

KING LEAR

The balance of the mind, family and kingdom of King Lear represents the concept of the balance of power in sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe, the central predominant principle of European international relations explored by Bacon in his essay Of Empire in which he presents the necessary policy guidelines for maintaining a balance of power. The play serves as a dramatic embodiment of Bacon’s Doctrine of Negotiations condensed into the small compass of his tragedy whose central theme is the ingratitude of humankind and its inability to recognise love. In his essay Of Parents and Children Bacon states, ‘The difference in affection of parents towards their several children is many times unequal; and sometimes unworthy’, and he may have added disastrous, seen in the parentage of King Lear and the consequence of his attitude towards his daughters Goneril, Regan and Cordelia.

7b48b1_eb8bfaaa951a494bae5d6f8034ba7766~In Shakespeares Doctrine of Nature: A Study of King Lear Professor John F. Danby correctly staes that King Lear dramatises the meanings of Nature it being ‘the real Novum Organum of Elizabethan thought’, that incorporates the ‘technical meanings of Novum Organum’, follows other theories articulated by Bacon, with thought in King Lear expressed in Baconian language, and ‘the view of the Lear party’ the same as that expressed by Bacon in his other acknowledged writings.

www.spearshakerproductions.com

https://www.youtube.com/@SpearshakerProductions/videos

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20 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric, 

Othello was performed before James I in the Banqueting House at Whitehall on 1 November 1604. It is believed it was written earlier the same year although there is always the possibility it was written late in 1603 after Richard Knowles's History of the Turks published sometime after 30 September 1603, from where it is believed some information was taken from it for the play.

Orthodox scholars either pass over in silence the differences between the 1622 quarto edition and the 1623 Folio version, or try and account for it by saying the omissions in the 1622 quarto represents cuts in the acting version, or it was set up from a transcript of a prompt-book for the play, or the Folio version was based upon either a copy of the 1622 quarto which had been collated with prompt-book, or a copy of the 1622 quarto was corrected against a fair copy of the play.

What they can't say (for obvious reasons) is that the reason the First Folio version is 160 lines longer with more than 1,OOO (ONE THOUSAND) plus differences in wording from the 1622 quarto is the true author of Othello was well and truly alive in 1622 and 1623, some six or seven years after Willy from Stratford had shuffled off this mortal coil! 

 

Thanks for your very helpful reply, A.P.

Naturally, in terms of evidence, the contrived orthodox "explanations" for the differences between the two versions of Othello are entirely without factual basis. Great research!

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PLAYS

MACBETH

The central dominant themes of the Scottish tragedy Macbeth are kingship (Bacon was deprived of his kingship by James I), betrayal (he was betrayed by his own mother Queen Elizabeth who never recognised his right to the throne) and ambition, the subject Bacon wrote an essay on around the time he penned Macbeth.

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In his essay Of Ambition Bacon says ambition is like a choler, a disease, which spreads if it is not stopped and if the desires of ambitious men are checked they become secretly discontent and look upon other men and matters with an evil eye. Ambitious men prove dangerous and are obnoxious to ruin. Echoing a theme in his essay Of Simulation and Dissimulation ambitious people are full of equivocations and double meanings with their sly intentions to deceive, the marked characteristics of the evil pair Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. His Advancement of Learning published in 1605 during the same period Bacon was conjuring up Macbeth (believed to have been c. 1605-6), explore strikingly similar themes about the effects of the mind, and the nature and state of man, with the tragedy sharing many other parallels with his acknowledged writings and works.
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9 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

At first, I  did not even recognize her ! 

I never knew of her nor her husband until you suggested he play Shakespeare. Looking her up I think I like her!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Hathaway

Hathaway performed in several plays in high school. As a teenager, she was cast in the television series Get Real (1999–2000) and made her breakthrough by playing the lead role in the Disney comedy The Princess Diaries (2001).

She is connected to Disney, so maybe she could bring Spearshaker to them as I think this movie should be Disney's most successful movie ever. In fact, it should be the biggest movie ever made.

Funny, remember a long time ago I thought Patrick Wilson was going to play Bacon? It appears he and Anne starred together in Passengers:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passengers_(2008_film)

Passengers is a 2008 romantic mystery thriller film directed by Rodrigo García, written by Ronnie Christensen, and starring Anne Hathaway and Patrick Wilson. It was released in the United States by TriStar Pictures on October 24, 2008.

 

Wouldn't it be an irony if Anne Hathaway connected Disney with Spearshaker and she had a major role in the movie? Obviously the role of Anne Hathaway would not be fitting for one of the highest paid actresses in the world. Could she play Lady Anne Bacon?

 

 

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ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA

In his essay Of Love written around the same time as Antony and Cleopatra whose passionate love affair dominates the whole play Bacon writes, ‘The stage is more beholding to Love, than the life of man. For as to the stage, love is ever a matter of comedies, and now and then of tragedies. . .You may observe, that amongst all the great and worthy persons. . .there is not one that hath been transported to the mad degree of love. . .except nevertheless Marcus Antonius, the half partner of the empire of Rome. . .’ His essay Of Love serves as a knowing commentary and critique on Antony and Cleopatra generally believed to have been written in 1607-8, which first appeared in print in the Shakespeare First Folio.

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Images of instability characterise the play with the philosophy of instability and the delusion of humanity one of the themes addressed by Bacon in his Idols of the Cave in Novum Organum first printed in 1620 followed by Idols of the Theatre meaning ‘all received systems are but so many stage-plays, representing worlds of their own creation after an unreal and scenic fashion’, just as the characters of Antony and Cleopatra are portrayed by Bacon in the play.
 
His portrait of Cleopatra shadows Queen Elizabeth and Antony owes something to the tragic history of the Earl of Essex with the complicated and destructive relationship between Antony and Cleopatra mirroring a similar relationship between Elizabeth and Essex, aspects of which in the play are drawn from first-hand knowledge of their real lives, known only all too well to its author, Bacon.
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CORIOLANUS

When writing The Advancement of Learning (1605) Bacon also had in mind Coriolanus. When the play was written remains undetermined. It seems the first version cannot have been written before 1605, since the first scene of the play appears to draw on William Camden’s Remains of a Greater Work Concerning Britaine (1605), for one or two of its minor details with most Shakespeare commentators placing its date of composition or revision around 1607-8. It was first printed in the Shakespeare First Folio. Both the Advancement and Coriolanus includes passages devoted to Menenius’ fable of the belly and Bacon’s essay Of Friendship with its ‘god or beast’ idea also rests behind Coriolanus.

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The play has echoes of the Essex uprising with discernible parallels between the life of his brother the Earl of Essex and its eponymous character Coriolanus, who were both seen as traitors by the state and condemned for selfishly seeking power for their own ends.
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28 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

PLAYS

CORIOLANUS

When writing The Advancement of Learning (1605) Bacon also had in mind Coriolanus. When the play was written remains undetermined. It seems the first version cannot have been written before 1605, since the first scene of the play appears to draw on William Camden’s Remains of a Greater Work Concerning Britaine (1605), for one or two of its minor details with most Shakespeare commentators placing its date of composition or revision around 1607-8. It was first printed in the Shakespeare First Folio. Both the Advancement and Coriolanus includes passages devoted to Menenius’ fable of the belly and Bacon’s essay Of Friendship with its ‘god or beast’ idea also rests behind Coriolanus.

7b48b1_32540da4d9ac48519a0e6bf6abc3c684~
The play has echoes of the Essex uprising with discernible parallels between the life of his brother the Earl of Essex and its eponymous character Coriolanus, who were both seen as traitors by the state and condemned for selfishly seeking power for their own ends.

Hi A Phoenix,

I really look forward to seeing your script taking life on the big screen !❤️

Regarding the first scene of Coriolanus, one could add its link with the Work of William Harvey on the Blood circulation, knowing that William Harvey came back from Padua to England in 1603.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/618/index.html%3Fzoom=1200.html

 2 (TWO) "I'th midd'st a th'body"

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Yesterday, I read (diagonally) an interesting book about Bacon and Shakespeare on Vivisection published by William Thomson  in 1881 (with a particuliar thought for Rob 😊).

https://www.google.fr/books/edition/Bacon_and_Shakespeare_on_vivisection_by/-KcNAAAAQAAJ?hl=fr&gbpv=1

"In this manner, working through Harvey's scalpel, Bacon did shake a lance at the eyes of medical ignorance."

 

 

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7 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Yann,

Keep shining that Baconian torch.

If the Gods, Fate, or Cosmic Synchronicity determines that the epic Spearshaker film comes to fruition I have already reserved a place for you next to me at its World Premier. 

If Napoleon with J. Phoenix does well, interest in Speakshaker will go up. 😉

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt13287846/

 

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PLAYS

CYMBELINE

The play takes its name and is set in the reign of the legendary British king Cymbeline who is said to have reigned from 33 BC shortly after the birth of Christ and in the time of Augustus Caesar. King Cymbeline appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain as one of King Arthur’s predecessors on the British throne prior to the conquest of Britain by the Romans. The play is closely connected with the old town of Verulam close to the site of the Bacon’s country estate Gorhambury and from whence Bacon took his title Baron Verulam.

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The site of old Verulam, St Albans (the proto-martyr St Alban is said to be the legendary founder of Freemasonry a myth concealing its true founder Francis Bacon, Viscount St. Albans) was the ancient seat of Cassibulan (or Casibilane), uncle to King Cymbeline, that prompted the title and subject matter of the play.
 
Beneath the surface there are numerous subterranean layers of esoteric Rosicrucian themes and symbolism with its enigmatic imagery akin to the two anonymous Rosicrucian manifestos written by Bacon. The mystery of the cave in Cymbeline mirrors the key central symbol of the first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis where in its vault/cave is found the tomb of Christian Rosencreutz, the fictional founder of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood. Imogen’s death-like sleep and resurrection in Cymbeline reflects moreover the rituals of initiation through the enaction of the mystery of death in the third Rosicrucian document The Chemical Wedding.
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PLAYS
THE WINTER'S TALE
From the time King James inherited the throne the union of England and Scotland dominated the political agenda in the years leading up to the writing of The Winters Tale in which these matters are encoded within it. At the very epicentre of the political process of the union between England and Scotland stood Bacon who through his parliamentary activity and speeches and his private and published writings did more than anyone else to help guide the matter to a satisfactory conclusion. In 1603 he published a treatise entitled A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of Kingdoms of England and Scotland in which he fully supported the idea and at the same time he was heavily involved in the parliamentary sessions from 1604 to 1610 wherein the divisive question of the union dominated the political agenda, with Bacon central to every aspect of it.
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In the autumn of 1604 he was working on the Anglo-Scottish committee and wrote Certain Articles or Considerations touching the Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland in which he addressed in some detail the legal and political changes that were necessary for a successful union. In 1605 Bacon further promoted the union with a new ‘History of Britain’ project which he returned to again some years later. His most pressing arguments for the union were presented in a long speech in the House of Commons on 17 February 1607 ‘Concerning the Articles of Naturalization’, further augmented with his other related writings Of the True Greatness of the Kingdom of Great Britain and essay Of the Greatness of Kingdoms included in the second edition of his Essays published in 1612. It was during the latter part of this period that Bacon wrote The Winters Tale dated by Shakespeare scholars somewhere between 1609 and 1611.
 
His essay Of Gardens also shows a remarkable number of correspondences, resemblances and parallels with The Winters Tale as well as several other Shakespeare plays. In Act 4 Scene 4 of The Winter's Tale Perdita explicitly refers to the Proserpina myth which he also discussed in De Sapientia Veterum (The Wisdom of the Ancients) first published in 1609 also written around the same time he wrote the play.
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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:
PLAYS
THE WINTER'S TALE
From the time King James inherited the throne the union of England and Scotland dominated the political agenda in the years leading up to the writing of The Winters Tale in which these matters are encoded within it. At the very epicentre of the political process of the union between England and Scotland stood Bacon who through his parliamentary activity and speeches and his private and published writings did more than anyone else to help guide the matter to a satisfactory conclusion. In 1603 he published a treatise entitled A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of Kingdoms of England and Scotland in which he fully supported the idea and at the same time he was heavily involved in the parliamentary sessions from 1604 to 1610 wherein the divisive question of the union dominated the political agenda, with Bacon central to every aspect of it.
7b48b1_0ef22fb901904ad598202ad1fd6ba962~
In the autumn of 1604 he was working on the Anglo-Scottish committee and wrote Certain Articles or Considerations touching the Union of the Kingdoms of England and Scotland in which he addressed in some detail the legal and political changes that were necessary for a successful union. In 1605 Bacon further promoted the union with a new ‘History of Britain’ project which he returned to again some years later. His most pressing arguments for the union were presented in a long speech in the House of Commons on 17 February 1607 ‘Concerning the Articles of Naturalization’, further augmented with his other related writings Of the True Greatness of the Kingdom of Great Britain and essay Of the Greatness of Kingdoms included in the second edition of his Essays published in 1612. It was during the latter part of this period that Bacon wrote The Winters Tale dated by Shakespeare scholars somewhere between 1609 and 1611.
 
His essay Of Gardens also shows a remarkable number of correspondences, resemblances and parallels with The Winters Tale as well as several other Shakespeare plays. In Act 4 Scene 4 of The Winter's Tale Perdita explicitly refers to the Proserpina myth which he also discussed in De Sapientia Veterum (The Wisdom of the Ancients) first published in 1609 also written around the same time he wrote the play.

Hi A Phoenix

Thank you for your terse, erudite exposition of the play. I haven't watched it yet but I have the BBC 1983 version with Helen Mirren on dvd. Your insights make me want to sit down and try and take it all in.

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PLAYS

TIMON OF ATHENS

The date the tragedy of Timon of Athens was written remains uncertain with scholars conjecturally assigning it anywhere from between 1605 and 1610 which may or may not have been a first version of the play. There is no record of any performance in the Jacobean era and all that we know of it can only be gleaned from its first printed text in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio, parts of which were composed or at the very least re-written and revised sometime after Bacon’s political fall in 1621.

In his essay Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature he highlights and emphasises its two key themes firstly goodness, what ‘the Grecians call Philanthropy, which ‘of all the virtues and dignities of the mind is the greatest’ and misanthropy, that Bacon personifies in the figure of Timon of Athens.

In his essay Of Friendship Bacon observes ‘Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god’, which is (observes its Oxford editor), ‘a suitable epigram for Timon of Athens.’
 
In the play its titular character Timon moves from his natural magnanimity and prodigious generosity to a state of misanthropy as a result of his devastating change in circumstances and the unkindness and ingratitude of his erstwhile friends all of whom had benefitted from his largess and philanthropy, who then subsequently desert him.
 
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The complex character of Timon of Athens partly reflects the story of Bacon after his fall when in order that King James could save the favourite George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, he sacrificed Bacon in one of the greatest political betrayals in English history, that has continued to unjustly damage his reputation in the eyes of posterity to the present day. He was sentenced by the House of Lords on trumped up charges of taking bribes. Dismissed from his position as Lord Chancellor, he was briefly imprisoned in the Tower and fined the enormous sum of £40,000. On his release Bacon was forbidden from entering London and exiled to Gorhambury where he endured hardship and in these drastically different circumstances his fair-weathered friends, who had previously benefitted from his greatness and generosity cruelly abandoned him.
 
Timon of Athens dramatically echoes the circumstances of its author Bacon of London, who unlike his titular character, rose from the absolute depths of despair to spend the last years of his known life writing, revising and translating his works for publication, with the help of those loyal good pens who had not deserted him. Among them, his longtime inward friend Ben Jonson, who helped Bacon with the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio, the greatest Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic work in the history of the world.
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HENRY VIII

The mythical immortal bird the Phoenix that lives every four or five hundred years is a symbol of renaissance and rebirth and has long been associated with Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood. Behind his pseudonym Shakespeare in Henry VIII Bacon refers to himself as the Phoenix who was destined to become the invisible Father of the Modern World and change the future direction of humanity.

The Shakespeare play covers only a part of Henry VIII’s reign from the Field of the Cloth of Gold in 1520 to the christening of Princess Elizabeth in 1533. Among other things it depicts the rise to the king’s favour of Anne Boleyn and the birth to Henry and Anne of a daughter, instead of the longed for son. A grand procession escorts the newly born royal infant before the assembled court where she is solemnly presented to the king by Archbishop Cranmer.
 
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Writing in retrospect in a play written years after Elizabeth’s death, Cranmer presents a prophecy (a dramatic invention by Bacon) in which the phoenix-like Princess Elizabeth in turn gives birth to a phoenix-like son and heir. A star which the fullness of time would reveal to be as great in fame as she was, one who would discover new nations (United States of America). He is likened in Rosicrucian metaphorical language to mountain cedar branches (reminiscent of the cedar used for the building of Solomon’s Temple representing the symbolic or mythical beginnings of Freemasonry) who would like a slow growing vine, as with his Rosicrucian Brotherhood secretly and invisibly build a new world for the future of mankind, which when eventually revealed, the children of posterity will give thanks to heaven and fully rejoice of him:
 
'The bird of wonder dies-the maiden phoenix-
Her ashes new create another heir
As great in admiration as herself,
So shall she leave her blessedness to one,
When heaven shall call her from this cloud of darkness,
Who from the sacred ashes of her honour
Shall star-like rise as great in fame as she was,
His honour and the greatness of his name
Shall be, and make new nations. He shall flourish,
And like a mountain cedar reach his branches
To all the plains about him. Our children’s children
Shall see this, and bless heaven.'

(5: 4: 40-46, 51-55)

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THE TEMPEST

The Tempest is perhaps the most Baconian of all the Shakespeare plays. Its central God-like figure the scientific-philosopher Prospero is a disguised dramatic portrait made in the image of his creator, the scientific-philosopher Francis Bacon, the Founding Father of Modern Science and Founding Father of the Modern World.

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Through his all-knowing and all-seeing mind, the scientific-philosopher Prospero controls the world and future destiny of humankind and can be seen as the commander-in-chief of the Rosicrucian Brothers who govern Salomon’s House in Bacon’s New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians), with Solomon’s Temple adopted as the foundation legend of its outer body, the Freemasonry Brotherhood. The Tempest described by Dr Yates as a Rosicrucian manifesto, is a condensed dramatic reflection of the discovery of the New World of North America and New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians) a philosophical and scientific blueprint for what became the United States of America, whose coeval the Rosicrucian manifesto Fama Fraternitatis was first set forth with their godly statement of intent for The Universal Reformation of the Whole World.
 
Like Prospero, above his kingdom, Bacon valued books and learning in his service and enduring legacy to humankind.

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THE BELMAN OF LONDON 1608

This work was brought to our attention on B'Hive by Yann in October 2022 to which we added a few observations about the figure on the title page as follows:

The figure is very Baconian and appears to represent the figure of Lord Bacon carrying a spear which of course is an allusion to his nom de plume Shakespeare

 

The title of the work is THE BELMAN OF LONDON and in his own words Bacon says that he 'rang the bell that called the wits together' .

Furthermore, if look more closely at the title page at the figure representing F BACON we are able to discern the letter F in the Lantern/Lamp, on his foot the letter B and in the quilt at the bottom of his coat the letter A, and to the right the letter spelling out the contraction F BAC. The other two letters are close at hand. We are able to discern the letter O on the door and the door itself forms the shape of N (as does the shape of the legs on the dog next to FB) spelling out F BACON.

While looking through my old papers I came across a photocopy of this 1608 work which I had long forgotten about and was pleased to find it carried a Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece.

On the STC entry there is the following note: 'f. N. Butter, 1608 [really W. Stansby, c. 1620.]' 

 

 

Belman.png

Belman 1.jpg

Belman 2.jpg

Belman 3.jpg

Belman AA.jpg

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