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Spearshaker – a Film about the Secret Life of Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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44 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

I think that it does not put in question the "page 32/33" part but it means that the "287" part date from 1904.

I love the how the segue from page 156 to 157 talks of sailing. I'd have to spend some time to understand what is going on, but it sure seems to be inviting closer examination. 🙂

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What is this book??? LOL

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Hi Yann and Rob,

This is a very curious title page.

Here are a few provisional observations.

Firstly, the figure is very Baconian and appears to represent the figure of Lord Bacon carrying a spear which of course is an allusion to his nom de plume Shakespeare. He is depicted carrying a Lantern or Lamp representing the Light of the Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross. In Mathematicall Magick the Baconian disciple and Rosicrucian Brother in a chapter discussing subterraneous lamps, makes the following remarkable statement:


Such a lamp is likewise related to be seen in the sepulchre of Francis Rosicrosse, as is more largely expressed in the confession of that fraternity.

The passage contains a deliberate error a device used by the Rosicrucian Brotherhood when disclosing a secret about Francis Bacon. The sepulchre with the lamp in its vault is described not in the Confessio Fraternitatis, but in the preceding first Rosicrucian manifesto, the Fama Fraternitatis with the passage cryptically indicating that Francis Bacon (‘Francis Rosicrosse’) was the secret founder of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood and the secret author of its two manifestos.

Similarly, the image also reminds us of the emblem depicting Dr Dee passing the Lantern/Lamp to Lord Bacon.

The title of the work is THE BELMAN OF LONDON and in his own words Bacon says that he 'rang the bell that called the wits together' .

Furthermore, if look more closely at the title page at the figure representing F BACON we are able to discern the letter F in the Lantern/Lamp, on his foot the letter B and in the quilt at the bottom of his coat the letter A, and to the right the letter spelling out the contraction F BAC. The other two letters are close at hand. We are able to discern the letter O on the door and the door itself forms the shape of N (as does the shape of the legs on the dog next to FB) spelling out F BACON.

 

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johndee.gif

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PEOPLE
DR JOHN DEE
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By definition the English secret state and what became the English Secret Service was governed by strict secrecy. The lifeblood of intelligence and information was the arcane art and science of codes and ciphers and other forms of secret writings. With this in mind in early 1563 Sir William Cecil directed Dr John Dee tutor and mentor at various times to Queen Elizabeth and Lord Robert Dudley, and afterwards mentor to a young Francis Bacon, to seek out a rare manuscript copy of Johannes Trithemius’s Steganographia. The spy, intelligencer and secret government agent Dr Dee, had a profound and extensive interest in cryptology and in a letter written to Cecil from Antwerp dated 16 February 1563 he informs him that he had eventually tracked down a prized manuscript of Steganographia and had spent the last ten days in continual labour making a copy of it.
 
The German Renaissance polymath Johannes Trithemius (1462-1516) was one of the founding fathers of modern cryptography. He wrote the first published work on the subject entitled Polygraphia which appeared in 1518. He had started his work on his Steganographia (‘Covered Writings’) in 1499. In addition, to the manuscript copy of the Steganographia Dr Dee owned several copies of Polygraphia. He also studied Jacques Gohorry’s De Usu et Mysteriis Notarum and Jacopo Silvestri’s Opus Novum which he used to practice writing in cipher.
 
With the copied manuscript of Trithemius’s Steganographia Dr Dee returned to England to show Principal Secretary of State Sir William Cecil and his brother-in-law Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon his prized possession. All three of them were aware that together with the Polygraphia these two works on cryptology (codes and ciphers) would prove to be important weapons in maintaining the national security of the kingdom.
 
The great mathematician and expert in codes and cipher Dr Dee came into contact with his young protégé Francis Bacon at a very early age with an entranced Bacon visiting his library and laboratory at his Mortlake home. Dr Dee knew Bacon was the secret royal son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, with both of whom he had a long relationship and of course moved in the same government and court circles as his patron Sir William Cecil and his brother-in-law Sir Nicholas Bacon. The young Francis spent his youth growing up at York House the official residence of his father the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal which stood adjacent to the grounds of York Place (now known to us as the Palace of Whitehall containing government building including the Cabinet Office and Ministry of Defence, an arm of British Intelligence), Queen Elizabeth’s Palace, the residence of English monarchs from the early sixteenth century.
 
The prodigious Francis grew up at court with its throngs of foreign ambassadors, diplomats and intelligencers, the leading figures of the English establishment, its government, various secret agents and other members of the Tudor spy network overseen by his uncle Sir William Cecil, his father Sir Nicholas Bacon and spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham. Like everyone else at court, its senior spy and expert on codes and ciphers Dr Dee, was familiar with the precocious intellect of his young protégé described by Queen Elizabeth as her young Lord Keeper, whose dazzling intellect truly astonished all those who crossed his path. Dr Dee was almost certainly one of Bacon’s most early intellectual influences across a whole range of scientific disciplines.
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PLACES
ST MICHAEL'S CHURCH, ST ALBANS
7b48b1_8ea9dbb1dd5a4142af9cf60b739103ac~
 
St Michael’s Church is in St Albans, Hertfordshire and dates from the 10th and 11th century making it a most significant Anglo-Saxon building. It is near the centre of the old Roman city of Verulamium and just over 2 miles from Gorhambury so would have been the local parish church of the Bacons.
 
There is a letter to Francis' friend Michael Hicks just after Lady Anne Bacon’s death in 1610 asking him to come to 'the mournful occasion' of her funeral. When Francis drew up his own last will, its second clause ran, ‘For my burial, I desire it may be in St. Michael’s Church, near St. Albans-there my mother was buried'. If Lady Anne was indeed buried there, it unfortunately shows no sign of her burial place and the same goes for Francis where there is a monument but likewise no recorded burial place. There is no documentation, nor account or report of his funeral or burial and the register for the entry for burials at St Michael’s Church prior to 1643 are missing. Transcripts of them are preserved in the Archdeaconry Court of St Albans Abbey from 1572 to 1600 and from 1629 to 1630 which omits the year Bacon is said to have been buried at St Michael’s Church. Nor is there any item for funeral expenses in the Accounts of Administration of Bacon’s Estate. There is also no mention of his funeral in any contemporary works, documents, letters, diaries, or a single report from any one whatsoever who attended the funeral of the greatest and arguably the most famous man of the period. Very strange indeed!
 
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The Bacon Monument in St Michael's Church
St Michael’s present day alter table, tester and pulpit date from the 16th and early 17th centuries with its most important feature being the life-sized monument of Francis Bacon in a recess in the north wall of the chancel. The monument of Bacon is in reflective pose and was erected by his private secretary and member of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood Sir Thomas Meautys replete with an epitaph written by his cousin Sir Henry Wotton, a member of the English Secret Service and Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood. The name of the sculptor is not known but was quite possibly Nicholas Stone master-mason to both King James I and King Charles I.
 
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PLAYS

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM

The secret triangular relationship between Francis Tudor Bacon, his younger royal brother Robert Tudor Devereux, second Earl of Essex, and their mother Queen Elizabeth lies behind the dramatic entertainment Of Love and Self-Love written by Bacon on behalf of Essex and presented before the Queen as part of the festivities celebrating her Accession Day on 17 November 1595. The dramatic device shares themes, subjects and language with A Midsummer Nights Dream written during the same year with the one effectively forming a companion piece to the other.

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The structure of A Midsummer Nights Dream is constructed around the relationship between the King and Queen of the Fairies, Oberon (the Earl of Leicester) and Titania (Queen Elizabeth) and the Indian Boy (Changeling Boy) over whom the two of them quarrel. The parentage and true paternity of the unseen Indian Boy is secret, ambiguous, and uncertain, whose symbolic presence is central to the whole play. In the allegorical drama Bacon reflecting his own secret royal and adoptive parentage provides conflicting explanations of the Indian Prince and his origin. The ghost character of the Indian Boy represents its ghost author Bacon, and here the changeling child is one taken from its mother and raised by someone else, as was the case with Bacon born to Queen Elizabeth (Titania) and Oberon (Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester) and raised by Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Bacon.
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9 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Such a lamp is likewise related to be seen in the sepulchre of Francis Rosicrosse, as is more largely expressed in the confession of that fraternity.

The passage contains a deliberate error a device used by the Rosicrucian Brotherhood when disclosing a secret about Francis Bacon. The sepulchre with the lamp in its vault is described not in the Confessio Fraternitatis, but in the preceding first Rosicrucian manifesto, the Fama Fraternitatis with the passage cryptically indicating that Francis Bacon (‘Francis Rosicrosse’) was the secret founder of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood and the secret author of its two manifestos.

Similarly, the image also reminds us of the emblem depicting Dr Dee passing the Lantern/Lamp to Lord Bacon.

The title of the work is THE BELMAN OF LONDON and in his own words Bacon says that he 'rang the bell that called the wits together' .

Hi A Phoenix,

Thank you so much for sharing with us these insightful first provisional observations.🙏

I did not know this quote of Bacon,  that he "rang the bell that called the wits together".

It reminded me the famous L. Dingwell (Instead of L. Dingwall ) on page 33 of Minerva Britanna.

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https://archive.org/details/minervabritannao00peac/page/33/mode/2up

Wondering if there was a link between this Book by Nathaniel "Butter" and the famous page 53 of HISTORIES with BACON/BUTTER (See The Seven Steps to Mercy by Petter Amundsen" here is what I have just found ...

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https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/373/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

Notice that " I prethee lend me thy Lanthorne to see..." is the 33rd line of dialogue of Act 2 scene 1.

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1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

Wondering if there was a link between this Book by Nathaniel "Butter" and the famous page 53 of HISTORIES with BACON/BUTTER (See The Seven Steps to Mercy by Petter Amundsen" here is what I have just found ...

I'm not familiar with the "Butter" concept. But I will say I have never heard "Eggs and Butter" before yet all my life have heard "Eggs and Bacon."

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Just now, Light-of-Truth said:

I'm not familiar with the "Butter" concept. But I will say I have never heard "Eggs and Butter" before yet all my life have heard "Eggs and Bacon."

Summer of 1623, the final edits to the First Folio:

Ben: I seriously believe having "Eggs and Bacon" following "hang" right above "S.Nicholas" on page 53 is too obvious.

Francis: You may be right, but I fear even in 400 years nobody will get the our hidden messages woven into page 53s.

Ben: True, but if we are alive and the Truth is revealed our heads might roll.

Francis: How about "Eggs and Butter", so that way we keep the big B?

Ben: In agreement. It's still obvious, but might take 400 years for anybody to notice!

 

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Hi Rob,

We have had a similar conversation in our house many times imagining Francis and Ben having conversations in just the way you expressed it above.  It is certainly astonishing how it took so long for some of the more obvious hints and clues to be identified taking nearly two hundred and fifty years before Baconians began to highlight them. 

Still now here on B'Hive four hundred years after the publication of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio things are being brought to light on a very regular and almost daily basis. It is remarkable that our B'Hive contributors still keep finding things.   

And for the hidden rare and arcane jewels, we have our Ace in the Pack, our very own superstar, Yann. 

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11 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

And for the hidden rare and arcane jewels, we have our Ace in the Pack, our very own superstar, Yann. 

"Like stones of worth they thinly placed are"

As someone who has Pierced a Veil or two in my life, feeling special myself the way I can see through some fluff, I will say to anyone who pays attention that Yann has a true once in a lifetime Gift of Seeing, more than anyone I have ever met for sure. I'm not sure I have even read anything by anyone since Bacon with the incredible extra-dimensional grasp that Yann shares.

Amazing, totally amazing. I'd love to take a three hour tour of his Mind! (Yes, you, Yann, "Allisnum2er").

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19 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

We have had a similar conversation in our house many times imagining Francis and Ben having conversations in just the way you expressed it above.

We are not imagining, we are keeping the living conversation alive. 😉

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YANN is 14 Short cipher the same as the Simple cipher of DEE.

Joking aside, one of the things to me we cannot explain is that it seems Bacon (and Dee) teaches us about how time is an illusion. 400 years is exactly the same as right now. But how do we even understand that weirdness? Is there another dimension our five human filters remove from our infinite and eternal consciousness?

 

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Thank you for your very kind words A Phoenix and Rob. 🙏❤️ For me, all is the fruit of the exchange of ideas and knowledge offered by the great forum that is the B'Hive . And it is thanks to each of you that I make a lot of my discoveries like this last one thanks to a quote of Bacon that you, A Phoenix, shared with us, and that opened a range of different possibilities.

Rob, regarding the idea of taking a three tour in my mind, it is risky ! This is all a bit of a mess, and a true Labyrinth ! 😄

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1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

Rob, regarding the idea of taking a three tour in my mind, it is risky ! This is all a bit of a mess, and a true Labyrinth ! 😄

This song came on my earbuds and I turned it all the way up. LOL

You do have the key. LOL

EDIT: A few lyrics..(for you, Yann):

If you could see my mind, if you really look deep, then maybe you'll find
That somewhere there will be a place, hidden behind my comedian face
You will find somewhere there's a house, and inside that house there's a room
Locked in the room in the corner you see

A voice is waiting for me, to set it free, I got the key, I got the key
Voices, I hear voices

In my head the voice is waiting, waiting for me to set it free

 

The voice is Bacon's and some of us know it very well my friend. 😉

 

 

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PEOPLE

ELIZABETH HATTON

Elizabeth was a Cecil, beautiful, spirited and learned, daughter of Thomas Cecil and granddaughter to William Cecil, she was Bacon’s second cousin. They would have known each other very well as unlike his brother Robert, Thomas Cecil and Francis had a good relationship and would have visited each other regularly. Elizabeth was married very young to Sir William Hatton a man much older than her and in poor health.

In 1597 Francis Bacon courted his cousin, the recently widowed Elizabeth Hatton. She declined his proposal and married Bacon’s arch enemy, the wealthy and ambitious Edward Coke instead, an act that she quickly came to bitterly regret as they lived separate lives from early in their marriage. She also famously refused to take his name, an act which both angered and embarrassed the arrogant Coke.
 
The bold and vivacious Elizabeth appeared in many masques and entertainments at court and her and Francis’ paths would often cross with their earlier fondness for each other seemingly unchanged. They were near neighbours with Hatton House being just a short walk from Bacon’s lodgings at Gray’s Inn where they would chat about court life, masques, plays and their love of gardens with Bacon advising her on the planting of a beautiful new garden at Hatton House. Elizabeth famously refused Coke access to the palatial Hatton House (formerly Ely Palace) which she had inherited from her first husband, with her and Coke quarrelling bitterly as Coke wanted a share of her estate. Elizabeth’s close links at court continued when she became a trusted and much loved Lady in Waiting to James I’s wife, the reserved Queen Anne of Denmark.
 
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Eilzabeth's daughter Lady Frances Purbeck
Elizabeth and Coke had two daughters firstly Elizabeth and later Frances who was born in 1602. Fifteen years later, Elizabeth burst into Bacon’s bedroom at York House, demanding that he advise her and use his influence to rescue her youngest daughter Frances who had been "kidnapped" by her husband Coke in order to force her to marry the unstable John Villiers brother of the Duke of Buckingham. Bacon went to great lengths to attempt to help Elizabeth and very much to his own detriment as he angered the favourite Buckingham, King James and Coke. His long-held love for Elizabeth would partly have accounted for this but perhaps he had far more paternal reasons to become so involved in the young Frances’ welfare.
 
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PLACES

THE BULL INN, BISHOPSGATE, LONDON

In times of plague and severe physical debilitation Anthony Bacon would stay at Redbourne one of his leasehold properties a few miles away from Gorhambury. When the Earl of Essex and Francis were inundated with intelligence coming in from Spain, Italy and Scotland they asked if Anthony could come to London to assist them. Anthony leased a house in the area of Bishopsgate, well known for its theatres and specifically The Bull Inn which was an Inn Playhouse that put on plays in the coaching courtyard outside and a regular venue for The Queen’s Men.

 
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The Bull Inn home to 'pernicious and obscene plays'
Anthony’s house in Bishopsgate Street was almost next door to The Bull Inn and within easy reach of Shoreditch, home to Burbage’s playhouses The Theatre and Curtain. It was a very convenient residence for theatre visits with his brother Francis but seen as a scandalous abode to their puritan mother Lady Anne which she communicated to Anthony in no uncertain terms, ‘touching your house taken in Bishopsgate Street. . . people there given to voluptuousness. . .and the Bull Inn there with continual interludes had even infected the inhabitants with corrupt and lewd dispositions. . .to live so near a place haunted with such pernicious and obscene plays and theatres able to poison the very godly.’
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PLAYS

RICHARD II

7b48b1_efa4fec9d78e419686a4438da5304b32~
 
The English history play Richard II opens with a trial scene in which the king acts as judge and jury in a matter of grave import wherein two of his leading noblemen accuse each other of treason, and each of them challenges one another to a duel. The scourge of trial by combat or duelling had been a source of grievance both morally and legally for Bacon from his early years studying law at Gray’s Inn and one of his first tasks on appointment as Attorney-General was to try and put a stop to it, which he condemned in The Charge of Sir Francis Bacon Knight, his Maiestys Attourney generall, touching Duells. The most controversial part of the play containing the deposition scene shows the final stages of power being transferred from Richard to Bolingbroke in which he yields up his crown a sacrifice made by Bacon the true heir to the throne in giving up his crown in favour of King James of Scotland.
 
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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PEOPLE

ELIZABETH HATTON

Elizabeth was a Cecil, beautiful, spirited and learned, daughter of Thomas Cecil and granddaughter to William Cecil, she was Bacon’s second cousin. They would have known each other very well as unlike his brother Robert, Thomas Cecil and Francis had a good relationship and would have visited each other regularly. Elizabeth was married very young to Sir William Hatton a man much older than her and in poor health.

In 1597 Francis Bacon courted his cousin, the recently widowed Elizabeth Hatton. She declined his proposal and married Bacon’s arch enemy, the wealthy and ambitious Edward Coke instead, an act that she quickly came to bitterly regret as they lived separate lives from early in their marriage. She also famously refused to take his name, an act which both angered and embarrassed the arrogant Coke.
 
The bold and vivacious Elizabeth appeared in many masques and entertainments at court and her and Francis’ paths would often cross with their earlier fondness for each other seemingly unchanged. They were near neighbours with Hatton House being just a short walk from Bacon’s lodgings at Gray’s Inn where they would chat about court life, masques, plays and their love of gardens with Bacon advising her on the planting of a beautiful new garden at Hatton House. Elizabeth famously refused Coke access to the palatial Hatton House (formerly Ely Palace) which she had inherited from her first husband, with her and Coke quarrelling bitterly as Coke wanted a share of her estate. Elizabeth’s close links at court continued when she became a trusted and much loved Lady in Waiting to James I’s wife, the reserved Queen Anne of Denmark.
 
7b48b1_c4716e4678204ac08881dc8f6c68f577~
Eilzabeth's daughter Lady Frances Purbeck
Elizabeth and Coke had two daughters firstly Elizabeth and later Frances who was born in 1602. Fifteen years later, Elizabeth burst into Bacon’s bedroom at York House, demanding that he advise her and use his influence to rescue her youngest daughter Frances who had been "kidnapped" by her husband Coke in order to force her to marry the unstable John Villiers brother of the Duke of Buckingham. Bacon went to great lengths to attempt to help Elizabeth and very much to his own detriment as he angered the favourite Buckingham, King James and Coke. His long-held love for Elizabeth would partly have accounted for this but perhaps he had far more paternal reasons to become so involved in the young Frances’ welfare.
 

https://exploring-london.com/tag/lady-elizabeth-hatton/

Re: last sentence. You're not suggesting that Frances Hatton was Francis Bacon's daughter.... how very dare you!

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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😆 Hi Eric,

Elizabeth Cecil Hatton was Francis Bacon's second cousin and he wanted to marry her. She married Coke instead whom she had a difficult relationship and they lived very separate lives with her refusing to take his name. Elizabeth and Francis Bacon continued to have a very close relationship throughout their lives. Elizabeth named her youngest daughter Frances and when she was a teenager Coke demanded that she marry Buckingham's unsuitable brother. It was to FB that Elizabeth turned to in order to try and prevent the marriage. One may wonder whether Frances Hatton Coke (Lady Purbeck) was possibly FB's daughter. Just a thought!  

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

😆 Hi Eric,

Elizabeth Cecil Hatton was Francis Bacon's second cousin and he wanted to marry her. She married Coke instead whom she had a difficult relationship and they lived very separate lives with her refusing to take his name. Elizabeth and Francis Bacon continued to have a very close relationship throughout their lives. Elizabeth named her youngest daughter Frances and when she was a teenager Coke demanded that she marry Buckingham's unsuitable brother. It was to FB that Elizabeth turned to in order to try and prevent the marriage. One may wonder whether Frances Hatton Coke (Lady Purbeck) was possibly FB's daughter. Just a thought!  

Thanks A. P. Of course I meant Frances, not Elizabeth. Past my bedtime. 🙂

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11 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

One may wonder whether Frances Hatton Coke (Lady Purbeck) was possibly FB's daughter. Just a thought!  

It does seem Bacon went above and beyond what he would have been obligated to do for her. Perhaps he did have some intimate relationship with Elizabeth Cecil Hatton. Frances might be named after her biological father and it sounds like Coke was probably not in her bed much.

I can't say I have noticed Father/Daughter clues in the Sonnets, but I have not had my eyes open to that concept. Mother/Son permeates the Sonnets.

Did Dee know Elizabeth Cecil Hatton?

EDIT:

So this might be Bacon's grandson?

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Coke-133

In October, Robert was baptised as "Robert Wright" and soon rumors began that his father was Robert Howard, a son of the Earl of Suffolk.

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PEOPLE

SIR FRANCIS WALSINGHAM

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Sir Francis Walsingham was a principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth and most famously known as her spymaster. With William Cecil, Walsingham established an English Secret Service to deal with the many plots on Elizabeth’s life and the thwarting of Catholic conspiracies. During the 1580s Walsingham worked closely with Francis Bacon following his return from the continent on state business. Bacon alongside his former Trinity friend Thomas Phelippes the renowned linguist and cryptographer, assisted Walsingham in breaking codes and creating false letters as decoys at home whilst Anthony Bacon became the leading agent for the English secret service abroad where he maintained a wide network of agents and spies across the continent.
 
Walsingham was a zealous Protestant and had a ruthless reputation when it came to the service and protection of the state. He was however of a very kind and supportive nature towards his young charges and often offered them practical advice. He had heard of Anthony’s proclivity for potion and ‘physic’ taking (opiates) and immediately dispensed some fatherly advice writing, ‘I have been informed you too easily and too often give yourself to the taking of physic, a thing which as I have by experience found hurtful in myself, when I was of your years.’ A better diet, exercise and abstinence were all highly recommended by Walsingham who needed his agents on top form.
 
At some stage Bacon’s concealed younger royal brother Robert, Earl of Essex joined the service and was compelled to marry Walsingham’s widowed daughter Frances when she became pregnant with his child. Her first husband was Sir Philip Sidney. Walsingham was not Essex’s father in law for long as a lifetime working with danger and secrecy had taken its toll. He died in 1590 leaving the Bacons and Essex with all the knowledge and networks needed to continue his work. Walsingham complained of ‘the greatness of my debts and the mean state I shall leave my wife and heirs in’. He spent much of his own money in the service of the Queen and the Protestant cause and he died in poverty being buried quickly in St Paul’s overnight in case his creditors should come and rip open his coffin. A sad end for a man who had given a lifetime’s service for Queen and country.
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