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Spearshaker – a Film about the Secret Life of Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PLACES

NORTHUMBERLAND HOUSE, THE STRAND, LONDON

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The Strand frontage of Northumberland House by Canaletto 1752
During the 1640s Northumberland House was the London residence of the Percy family, the earls and dukes of Northumberland along with their country seat at Alnwick Castle in Northumberland. Bacon and Henry Percy, the ninth Earl of Northumberland knew each other very well and shared many common interests. Northumberland was known as the ‘Wizard Earl’ because of his love for alchemy and scientific experiments as well as owning a large impressive library in his London residence Syon House. In 1594 Northumberland married Dorothy Devereux, sister of Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, Bacon’s secret royal brother.
 
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Northumberland MS. transcription held at Alnwick
In 1867 at Northumberland House then still in the possession of the Percy family there was discovered a truly unique and most remarkable Elizabethan manuscript (c. 1596) of the utmost historical importance. The manuscript belonging to Francis Bacon contained copies of his early writings and originally housed his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III. The contents page reveals explosive information with the names of Francis Bacon and William Shakespeare scribbled repeatedly all over its outer cover. This is the only contemporary Elizabethan document in the world that features the names of Bacon and Shakespeare. The critically important Bacon-Shakespeare manuscript is now held at the Northumberland’s country seat at Alnwick Castle.

 

Dorothy_penelope_devereaux.jpeg.668414086e30b1bce40fd3aea66274f9.jpeg

"Portrait of Dorothy and Penelope Devereux, daughters of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex and his wife Lettice Knollys. Now at Longleat House." Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Percy,_Countess_of_Northumberland

Edited by Eric Roberts
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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

'Fascinating idea for a movie!'

Thanks to Freemason and journalist 'The Magpie Mason' who has just posted a wonderful blog about the filmic project Spearshaker exploring the Life and Times of Francis Bacon.

'The Magpie Mason is an obscure journalist in the Craft who writes, with occasional flashes of superficial cleverness, about Freemasonry’s current events and history; literature and art; philosophy and pipe smoking. He is a Past Master who tiles Publicity Lodge 1000 and pays the Craft their wages (IF any be due!) at The American Lodge of Research, both in New York City. He is a past president of the Masonic Society'

Read here: https://themagpiemason.blogspot.com/2023/10/film-project-spearshaker-knowledge-is.html

Magpie1.jpg

Great reaction to the project.

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'What do we think we know about History. . .My story is stange but true and I will tell it to you an unkowing world and you will probably not believe me. . .'

Who is Francis Bacon?

 

www.spearshakerproductions.com

https://www.youtube.com/@SpearshakerProductions/videos

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20 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

Dorothy_penelope_devereaux.jpeg.668414086e30b1bce40fd3aea66274f9.jpeg

"Portrait of Dorothy and Penelope Devereux, daughters of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex and his wife Lettice Knollys. Now at Longleat House." Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_Percy,_Countess_of_Northumberland

 

Not related, but thought this portrait of Elizabeth I was amusing.

The Sieve Portrait. Elizabeth is portrayed as Tuccia, a Vestal Virgin who proved her chastity by carrying a sieve full of water from the Tiber to the Temple of Vesta.

https://jenikirbyhistory.getarchive.net/media/metsys-elizabeth-i-the-sieve-portrait-c1583-7933b9

I fail to see how somehow managing to transport some water over a certain distance with only a leaking sieve proves that they are a virgin. How whacky were these Elizabethans?!

 

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PEOPLE

ALICE BARNHAM

Bacon’s marriage to Alice Barnham when she was almost 14 and he 45 was almost certainly a political marriage linked to his rightful claim to the English throne. Alice is first mentioned three years previously just after James I ascends the throne and would appear to have been part of an arrangement with King James and Bacon’s cousin Sir Robert Cecil in order to assure them that he no longer had any pretensions to the crown and to ensure the King did not excommunicate him from state offices. It was extremely rare and controversial for royalty to marry a commoner and Alice Barnham was a commoner and by marrying her Bacon effectively confirmed that he would never make a claim to the throne so ensuring peace of mind for James and his heirs.

Though of lively wit and a ‘handsome maiden’, the pair were completely unsuited in every way possible. The unlikely couple were married at Marylebone Chapel in May 1606 with Bacon clad top to toe in purple and his young bride in cloth of silver and gold. Bacon’s choice of colour was perhaps a final nod to his lost birthright as only royalty were usually permitted to wear purple. Bacon given his nature, was undoubtedly kind and generous to her and as Alice and her mother Dorothy (according to contemporaries) had very extravagant tastes and were socially aspiring she would have been very happy with the many preferments James I gave her husband. They had no children and it would seem likely that they had a marriage purely of political convenience and an arrangement that suited them both and perhaps they even developed a fondness for each other.
 
Things were to change though. Around 1620 Alice was rumoured to be having an ongoing affair with Bacon's gentleman usher at York House called John Underhill. Coincidentally John Underhill was a cousin of the William Underhill who sold New Place to William Shakspere of Stratford. Following Bacon’s fall resulting from politically motivated charges in 1621 he was commanded to stay away from London and fined heavily. It appears Alice pleaded on behalf of her husband to the Duke of Buckingham, and then soon began to complain that there was no longer the money to keep her in the comfort she had been accustomed to. In 1625 Alice and Bacon appear to be estranged from each other and he suspected that she was indeed having a relationship with Underhill. He revoked his earlier will ‘for just and great causes’ and less than a fortnight after Bacon’s death Alice married John Underhill.
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PLACES

RICHMOND PALACE

Queen Elizabeth’s favourite palace stood on the banks of the River Thames in the 16th and 17th centuries in what was then rural Surrey.

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Richmond Palace, Elizabeth's Favourite Royal Residence
It was erected around 1501 by Elizabeth’s grandfather Henry VII and it was where both Elizabeth and her grand father Henry VII died. Nine miles south of the Palace of Westminster, Elizabeth favoured the clean, healthy air and quiet environment of Richmond and just across the river at Twickenham Park was the residence of her concealed son Francis Bacon.
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PLAYS

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS

At the famous Christmas Revels at Gray’s Inn 1594-5, Bacon organised a mock meeting of the Privy Council presided over by the Prince of Purpoole, Lord of Misrule, a cipher for Bacon himself-a Tudor Prince who was later married dressed head to toe in purple-the colour of royalty. It was during these revels the first known performance of his Shakespeare play The Comedy of Errors was performed, a play about errors, confusion and mistaken identity themes prominent in his later acknowledged works.

 
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In fact, Bacon’s whole philosophical system and scientific empirical methodological inquiry to which he devoted his entire lifetime and a subject he wrote several large treatises upon, departed from the premise that humankind had for thousands of years wandered through error upon error in what might very well be described as a veritable comedy of errors. It was on this very foundation that Bacon built his first major philosophical treatise which he aptly titled The Advancement of Learning wherein he began page after page with the word error in describing the phenomenon of historical and human error:
 
'Another error, induced by the former, is a distrust that any thing should be now to be found out, which the world should have missed and passed over so long time. . .'
 
Later in Book II of Advancement of Learning he directly alludes to Terence and Plautus the Roman playwright whose Latin play Menaechmi served as a source for some elements in The Comedy of Errors:
 
'(as it is used in some comedies of errors, wherein the mistress and the maid change habits), to be but as a servant, without which pleasure cannot be served and attended.'
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5 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PLACES

RICHMOND PALACE

Queen Elizabeth’s favourite palace stood on the banks of the River Thames in the 16th and 17th centuries in what was then rural Surrey.

7b48b1_42710cd4896043309ba085cd3e73673c~
Richmond Palace, Elizabeth's Favourite Royal Residence
It was erected around 1501 by Elizabeth’s grandfather Henry VII and it was where both Elizabeth and her grand father Henry VII died. Nine miles south of the Palace of Westminster, Elizabeth favoured the clean, healthy air and quiet environment of Richmond and just across the river at Twickenham Park was the residence of her concealed son Francis Bacon.

Richmond Palace sketched from Twickenham Park (?) in 1562

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond_Palace#/media/File:Wyngaerde_Richmond_1562.jpg

image.png.22e2a427006d925cfcedcd09479080b1.png

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Bacon was not the Prince of Purpoole, though, in the Gray's Inn Christmas Revels of 1594. As the cover of the publication shows, it was Henry. https://archive.org/details/gestagrayorumorh0000desm. Gesta Grayorum: Or the History of the High and Mighty Prince Henry Prince of Purpoole Anno Domine 1594, English Reprint Series, Ed. Desmond Bland (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1968).

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5 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PLAYS

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS

At the famous Christmas Revels at Gray’s Inn 1594-5, Bacon organised a mock meeting of the Privy Council presided over by the Prince of Purpoole, Lord of Misrule, a cipher for Bacon himself-a Tudor Prince who was later married dressed head to toe in purple-the colour of royalty. It was during these revels the first known performance of his Shakespeare play The Comedy of Errors was performed, a play about errors, confusion and mistaken identity themes prominent in his later acknowledged works.

 
7b48b1_89c5b0616ebe45699ca5d85465082b96~
In fact, Bacon’s whole philosophical system and scientific empirical methodological inquiry to which he devoted his entire lifetime and a subject he wrote several large treatises upon, departed from the premise that humankind had for thousands of years wandered through error upon error in what might very well be described as a veritable comedy of errors. It was on this very foundation that Bacon built his first major philosophical treatise which he aptly titled The Advancement of Learning wherein he began page after page with the word error in describing the phenomenon of historical and human error:
 
'Another error, induced by the former, is a distrust that any thing should be now to be found out, which the world should have missed and passed over so long time. . .'
 
Later in Book II of Advancement of Learning he directly alludes to Terence and Plautus the Roman playwright whose Latin play Menaechmi served as a source for some elements in The Comedy of Errors:
 
'(as it is used in some comedies of errors, wherein the mistress and the maid change habits), to be but as a servant, without which pleasure cannot be served and attended.'

Thanks A.P.

I've always taken the title of the play, "A Comedy of Errors", literally as referring to the play itself, rather than to the human condition. What a clever title!

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7 minutes ago, Christie Waldman said:

Bacon was not the Prince of Purpoole, though, in the Gray's Inn Christmas Revels of 1594. As the cover of the publication shows, it was Henry. https://archive.org/details/gestagrayorumorh0000desm. Gesta Grayorum: Or the History of the High and Mighty Prince Henry Prince of Purpoole Anno Domine 1594, English Reprint Series, Ed. Desmond Bland (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1968).

Sorry to sound dumb. Who is Henry? 1594 was the year that Henry, the future Prince of Wales was born. 

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THE PRINCE OF PURPLE (PURPOOLE) HENRY HOLMES (HELMES)

Hi Eric,

It has been some time since I looked at the Gray's Inn Revels. The last time was when I wrote a long paper on Bacon-Shakespeare and the Law (see link below). As I vaguely recall there is little or virtually nothing known about Henry Holmes/Helmes appointed the Prince of Purple (Purpoole) in the Gray's Inn Revels.

The magnificent Christmas Gray’s Inn Revels or Gesta Grayorum (affairs of Gray’s Inn) after detailed consultations the week before commenced on 20 December 1594 with the election of one Henry Holmes (or Helmes) as the Prince of Purple who had assigned to him a Privy Council, to advise him in matters of state and government, together with other officers of State and Law, a large household, Gentlemen Pensioners to attend on him, and a royal guard to protect his sacred person. For the provision of his treasury, the support of his state and dignity, several letters in the form of Privy Seals were sent to members of his court requesting they contribute to the defraying of the enormous cost involved for the intended performances of their planned entertainments, masques and plays. By this means, states its anonymous author, the Prince of Purple’s coffers were increased and bolstered ‘by the great Bounty of divers honourable Favourers of our State, that imparted their Liberality, to the setting forward of our intended Pass-times.’ 

See the paper below (pp. 57-68)

In our entry for The Comedy of Errors we pointed out that Bacon (the prime mover of the Gray's Inn Revels) organised a mock meeting of the Privy Council presided over by the Prince of Purpoole, Lord of Misrule, a cipher for Bacon himself-a Tudor Prince who was later married dressed head to toe in purple-the colour of royalty. 

In the first Life of Bacon entitled the ‘Discovrs Svr La Vie De Mre Francois Bacon, Chancelier D’ Angleterre’ which appeared in Paris in 1631 prefixed to what appeared to be a French translation of Bacon’s natural history Sylva Sylvarum as Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulan, Viscomtede sainct Alban, & Chancelier d’Angleterre its anonymous author directly alludes to FB being born in the purple the colour of royalty: 

'M. Bacon was not only obliged to imitate the virtues of such a one, but also those of many others of his ancestors, who have left so many marks of their greatness in history that honour and dignity seem to have been at all times the spoil of his family. Certain it is that no one can reproach him with having added less than they to the splendour of his race. Being thus born in the purple (ne parmy les pourpes) and brought up with the expectation of a grand career (lesperance dune grande fortune) his father had him instructed in “bonnes letters” with such great and such especial care that I know not to whom we are more indebted for all the splendid works (les beaux ouvrages) that he has left to us, whether to the mind of the son, or to the care the father had taken in making him cultivate it. But however that may be, the obligation we are under to the father is not small.

..I wish to state that he employed some years of his youth in travel in order to polish his mind and to mould his opinion by intercourse with all kinds of foreigners. France, Italy, and Spain, as the most civilized nations of the whole world, were those whither his desire for knowledge (curiosite) carried him. And as he saw himself destined one day to hold in his hands the helm of the kingdom (le timon du Royaume) instead of looking only at the people and the different fashions in dress, as do the most of those who travel, he observed judiciously the laws and the customs of the countries through which he passed, noted the different forms of Government in a State, with their advantages or defects, together with all the other matters which might help to make a man able for the government of men.'

[Pierre Ambiose, ‘Discovrs Svr La Vie De Mre Francois Bacon, Chancelier D’ Angleterre’, in Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulan, Viscomtede sainct Alban, & Chancelier d’Angleterre (Paris: Antoine de Sommaville & Andre Sovbron, 1631), pp. 1-26, especially, pp. 5-9]

For a discussion of this first Life of FB see our paper on The Pregnancy Portrait (pp: 42-45):

https://www.academia.edu/58228322/Francis_Bacon_and_The_Law_In_His_Early_Shakespeare_Plays_Reflected_In_His_Life_and_Acknowledged_Writings

https://www.academia.edu/45006558/The_Pregnancy_Portrait_of_Queen_Elizabeth_I_and_The_Secret_Royal_Birth_of_Francis_Bacon_Concealed_Author_of_the_Shakespeare_Works

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Hi Yann,

Thank you.

I don't recall knowing or reading the biographical entry on Sir Henry Helmes with all his connections to Lord Bacon which serves as a additional resource for confirming that FB was involved in every aspect of the Gray's Inn Revels; not least, of course, the premier of his Shakespeare play The Comedy of Errors.

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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8 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

THE PRINCE OF PURPLE (PURPOOLE) HENRY HOLMES (HELMES)

Hi Eric,

It has been some time since I looked at the Gray's Inn Revels. The last time was when I wrote a long paper on Bacon-Shakespeare and the Law (see link below). As I vaguely recall there is little or virtually nothing known about Henry Holmes/Helmes appointed the Prince of Purple (Purpoole) in the Gray's Inn Revels.

The magnificent Christmas Gray’s Inn Revels or Gesta Grayorum (affairs of Gray’s Inn) after detailed consultations the week before commenced on 20 December 1594 with the election of one Henry Holmes (or Helmes) as the Prince of Purple who had assigned to him a Privy Council, to advise him in matters of state and government, together with other officers of State and Law, a large household, Gentlemen Pensioners to attend on him, and a royal guard to protect his sacred person. For the provision of his treasury, the support of his state and dignity, several letters in the form of Privy Seals were sent to members of his court requesting they contribute to the defraying of the enormous cost involved for the intended performances of their planned entertainments, masques and plays. By this means, states its anonymous author, the Prince of Purple’s coffers were increased and bolstered ‘by the great Bounty of divers honourable Favourers of our State, that imparted their Liberality, to the setting forward of our intended Pass-times.’ 

See the paper below (pp. 57-68)

In our entry for The Comedy of Errors we pointed out that Bacon (the prime mover of the Gray's Inn Revels) organised a mock meeting of the Privy Council presided over by the Prince of Purpoole, Lord of Misrule, a cipher for Bacon himself-a Tudor Prince who was later married dressed head to toe in purple-the colour of royalty. 

In the first Life of Bacon entitled the ‘Discovrs Svr La Vie De Mre Francois Bacon, Chancelier D’ Angleterre’ which appeared in Paris in 1631 prefixed to what appeared to be a French translation of Bacon’s natural history Sylva Sylvarum as Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulan, Viscomtede sainct Alban, & Chancelier d’Angleterre its anonymous author directly alludes to FB being born in the purple the colour of royalty: 

'M. Bacon was not only obliged to imitate the virtues of such a one, but also those of many others of his ancestors, who have left so many marks of their greatness in history that honour and dignity seem to have been at all times the spoil of his family. Certain it is that no one can reproach him with having added less than they to the splendour of his race. Being thus born in the purple (ne parmy les pourpes) and brought up with the expectation of a grand career (lesperance dune grande fortune) his father had him instructed in “bonnes letters” with such great and such especial care that I know not to whom we are more indebted for all the splendid works (les beaux ouvrages) that he has left to us, whether to the mind of the son, or to the care the father had taken in making him cultivate it. But however that may be, the obligation we are under to the father is not small.

..I wish to state that he employed some years of his youth in travel in order to polish his mind and to mould his opinion by intercourse with all kinds of foreigners. France, Italy, and Spain, as the most civilized nations of the whole world, were those whither his desire for knowledge (curiosite) carried him. And as he saw himself destined one day to hold in his hands the helm of the kingdom (le timon du Royaume) instead of looking only at the people and the different fashions in dress, as do the most of those who travel, he observed judiciously the laws and the customs of the countries through which he passed, noted the different forms of Government in a State, with their advantages or defects, together with all the other matters which might help to make a man able for the government of men.'

[Pierre Ambiose, ‘Discovrs Svr La Vie De Mre Francois Bacon, Chancelier D’ Angleterre’, in Histoire Natvrelle De Mre Francois Bacon, Baron de Verulan, Viscomtede sainct Alban, & Chancelier d’Angleterre (Paris: Antoine de Sommaville & Andre Sovbron, 1631), pp. 1-26, especially, pp. 5-9]

For a discussion of this first Life of FB see our paper on The Pregnancy Portrait (pp: 42-45):

https://www.academia.edu/58228322/Francis_Bacon_and_The_Law_In_His_Early_Shakespeare_Plays_Reflected_In_His_Life_and_Acknowledged_Writings

https://www.academia.edu/45006558/The_Pregnancy_Portrait_of_Queen_Elizabeth_I_and_The_Secret_Royal_Birth_of_Francis_Bacon_Concealed_Author_of_the_Shakespeare_Works

Hi A Phoenix

Thank you so much for such a comprehensive reply! So Henry Holmes performed much the same function as Shaxper - a stand-in for the anonymous author of the revel. Your paper on "Bacon and the Law" goes on to say: 

The inauguration of the Prince of Purple (a cipher for Bacon himself-a Tudor Prince who was later married dressed head to toe in purple-the colour of royalty) took place before his enormous entourage of about one hundred and forty officers and attendants.

ScreenShot2023-10-30at9_59_46am.png.09733412421e1966852ee42949c11805.png

What an amazing concept: universal forgiveness!

 

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PEOPLE

BEN JONSON

7b48b1_c001da3fbf714e5e8b22019ef475054d~
Francis Bacon and Ben Jonson had a very close personal and professional friendship that lies at the very heart of the true concealed authorship of the Shakespeare works, which orthodox Stratfordian Shakespeare scholars have for centuries systematically ignored and suppressed.
 
In his own plays Ben Jonson through veiled references and allusions, anagrams and ciphers, repeatedly presents William Shakspere of Stratford as an uneducated, semi-illiterate clown and exposes him as a literary mask for his friend Francis Bacon, the secret true author of the Shakespeare plays.
 
For Bacon’s 60th birthday in 1621 at York House, Jonson was put in charge of the celebrations and for the occasion wrote a poem in which he calls Bacon a ‘Happy Genius’ and ‘his King’ and hints at Bacon’s concealed life, ‘thou stands’t as if some mysterie thou did’st’. Later, Jonson also reveals his personal feelings towards Bacon who he describes as ‘one of the greatest men, and most worthy of admiration’. He tells of Bacon’s famous wit and captivating oratory, ‘No man had their affections more in his power. The fear of every man that heard him was lest he should make an end’ as well as his estimation of Bacon’s supremacy as a poet and dramatist. ‘he may be named and stand as the mark and acme of our language.’
 
He mischievously uses very similar language for both Shakespeare and Bacon. In the First Folio:
 
Leave thee alone, for the comparison Of all,
that insolent Greece, or haughtie Rome
sent forth, or since did from their ashes come.
 
In his posthumously published meditations Jonson again writes of his king Bacon by repeating the wording he used for him in his verse prefixed to the Shakespeare First Folio:
 
‘He [Bacon], who hath fill’d up all numbers; and perform’d that in our tongue, which may be compar’d, or preferr’d either to insolent Greece, or haughty Rome.’
 
Following Bacon’s political fall in 1621, Jonson went to live with Bacon at his country estate in Gorhambury where he was one of Bacon’s ‘good pens’. As part of Bacon’s literary scriptorium he translated his Essays into Latin and was instrumental along with his Rosicrucian brother Bacon in bringing to fruition the monumental 1623 Shakespeare First Folio.
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PLACES

ST ALBANS

In A.D. 303 St. Alban became the first Christian Martyr in England and St Albans became heavily associated with the birthplace of Freemasonry. According to the central legend, the craft was introduced into England in the time of St Alban from whom the town of St Albans takes its name, and from whom Francis Bacon took his title Viscount St Alban. Old Verulam is the site of the old Roman town of Verulamium and within the city walls of the old city of Verulam, Bacon built Verulam House, within the grounds of his Gorhambury estate, that may have been used as an early Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Lodge.

According to another later legend, following Alban's execution his head was said to have rolled downhill and on stopping, a well sprang up now known as Holywell Hill site of The White Hart Inn. On his believed execution site now stands St Albans Cathedral.

7b48b1_4e5f75bba2d74a83845bb4cc6082a768~
St Albans Cathedral

In 1618 Bacon was created Baron Verulam of Verulam and became known as Francis, Lord Verulam and in 1621 Viscount St Alban.

Elizabeth’s extravagant Summer progresses around the country were legendary with a mile long procession consisting of a 1000 horses and her 300 strong court. She stayed at her royal estates and courtier’s homes which was a mixed blessing to them as the costs were extortionate. In the early part of her reign when Francis Bacon was a young boy, St Albans received more visits from Queen Elizabeth than Cambridge, Oxford, Bristol and Gloucester and her stays at the Bacon’s house at Gorhambury are well documented. Clearly Elizabeth had more personal reasons to come to the area on a regular basis, almost certainly to watch over the progress of her secret son.
 
In the Shakespeare plays St Albans is mentioned 17 times and in some references there was no more reason for it to be mentioned than any other town.
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PLAYS

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST

The early comedy Love’s Labour’s Lost is set in Navarre a kingdom between France and Spain at a time when Bacon was in France and when some of the historical events referred or alluded to in the play were happening and the kingdom where his brother Anthony Bacon, an intimate friend and correspondent of King Henry of Navarre, spent several years of his life. It was likely out of respect for a living king that Francis Bacon named the monarch in the play Ferdinand, King of Navarre and why the Princess of France (partly modelled upon Princess Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre and Queen of France with whom Bacon had a secret love affair) is not given a name in the play.

7b48b1_45f285afb2bb456f9938d2a73e15043c~
The lords attending the King of Navarre in the play Berowne, Longueville and Dumaine are named after historical persons-Duc de Biron and Duc de Longueville military leaders and loyal servants of Henry of Navarre, and Geraud de Lomagne, a Huguenot commander. Boyet the lord attending the Princess of France in the play is styled after another of Navarre’s lords, named Boyresse.
 
The passports of Anthony Bacon and his entourage providing them with official permission to travel through Navarre and parts of France are signed by Biron, Lomagne and Boyresse. The character Don Adriano de Armado in Loves Labours Lost is based upon the notorious Antonio Perez, Spanish statesman and secretary of King Phillip II who left Spain in November 1591. He twice travelled to England as an envoy to King Henry IV of France and Navarre where he formed a close friendship with Francis and Anthony Bacon, remaining in England until July 1595. One of the Ladies-in-Waiting attending the Princess of France is named Katherine, Christian name of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon’s younger sister Katherine Cooke Killigrew. Two of the other characters in Love's Labour's Lost Anthony Dull and Sir Nathaniel are named by Bacon after his two brothers Anthony and Sir Nathaniel Bacon.
 
In the play Sir Nathaniel, Anthony Dull and Holofernes engage in a convoluted exchange on learning. Armado in an aside to Holofernes asks, 'are you not lettered?’ to which Mote interjects ‘Yes, yes, he teaches boys the horn-book. What is ‘a, b’ spelled backward, with the horn on his head?’ The Latin for ‘horn’ is ‘cornu’, thus A B spelled backwards with a horn on its head is BACORNU phonetically indicating BACON-YOU BACON.
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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PLAYS

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST

The early comedy Love’s Labour’s Lost is set in Navarre a kingdom between France and Spain at a time when Bacon was in France and when some of the historical events referred or alluded to in the play were happening and the kingdom where his brother Anthony Bacon, an intimate friend and correspondent of King Henry of Navarre, spent several years of his life. It was likely out of respect for a living king that Francis Bacon named the monarch in the play Ferdinand, King of Navarre and why the Princess of France (partly modelled upon Princess Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre and Queen of France with whom Bacon had a secret love affair) is not given a name in the play.

7b48b1_45f285afb2bb456f9938d2a73e15043c~
The lords attending the King of Navarre in the play Berowne, Longueville and Dumaine are named after historical persons-Duc de Biron and Duc de Longueville military leaders and loyal servants of Henry of Navarre, and Geraud de Lomagne, a Huguenot commander. Boyet the lord attending the Princess of France in the play is styled after another of Navarre’s lords, named Boyresse.
 
The passports of Anthony Bacon and his entourage providing them with official permission to travel through Navarre and parts of France are signed by Biron, Lomagne and Boyresse. The character Don Adriano de Armado in Loves Labours Lost is based upon the notorious Antonio Perez, Spanish statesman and secretary of King Phillip II who left Spain in November 1591. He twice travelled to England as an envoy to King Henry IV of France and Navarre where he formed a close friendship with Francis and Anthony Bacon, remaining in England until July 1595. One of the Ladies-in-Waiting attending the Princess of France is named Katherine, Christian name of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon’s younger sister Katherine Cooke Killigrew. Two of the other characters in Love's Labour's Lost Anthony Dull and Sir Nathaniel are named by Bacon after his two brothers Anthony and Sir Nathaniel Bacon.
 
In the play Sir Nathaniel, Anthony Dull and Holofernes engage in a convoluted exchange on learning. Armado in an aside to Holofernes asks, 'are you not lettered?’ to which Mote interjects ‘Yes, yes, he teaches boys the horn-book. What is ‘a, b’ spelled backward, with the horn on his head?’ The Latin for ‘horn’ is ‘cornu’, thus A B spelled backwards with a horn on its head is BACORNU phonetically indicating BACON-YOU BACON.

BBC Play of the Month, 1975, with Martin Shaw in the lead role. Economically directed and seems to be fairly faithful to the written word. 

 

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8 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

In the play Sir Nathaniel, Anthony Dull and Holofernes engage in a convoluted exchange on learning. Armado in an aside to Holofernes asks, 'are you not lettered?’ to which Mote interjects ‘Yes, yes, he teaches boys the horn-book. What is ‘a, b’ spelled backward, with the horn on his head?’ The Latin for ‘horn’ is ‘cornu’, thus A B spelled backwards with a horn on its head is BACORNU phonetically indicating BACON-YOU BACON.

Hi A Phoenix,

 BACORNU is also the anagram of UR-BACON that could be link to UR-HAMLET 🙂

(The German prefix UR- means Original)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ur-Hamlet

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Hi A Phoenix,

Here is something that I've just found !

Two hours ago, I was working on the "All the world"s a stage" passage of "As you like it" for a upcoming video,

and I wondered why "Exits" is in Italic, but not "Entrances".

image.png.a21cfb994ad635dbe67092d1d9e5fc17.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/212/?zoom=1275

And few minutes ago, as I was doing some research on the net without real purpose, my research led me to this book published by Thomas Dekker in 1608 that you probably already know ...

https://books.google.fr/books?id=9bw8AAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA290&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

The Guls Hornbook: And The Belman of London in Two Parts.

The "Horn-Book" ... what a surprise !😃

"Yes, yes, he teaches boys the horn-book"

Another surprises were waiting for me in the Horn-Book.

Francis Bacon is mentioned only once ... on page 287 (FRA ROSI CROSSE kay Cipher).

And on the same page are mentioned ST ALBANS and ...

"the immortal scenes in Shakespeare's HENRY IV at The Boar's Head Tavern."

I decided to take a look on page 33 and guess what I found right before, at the end of page 32  ?

image.png.29b9d9e12324c710c44c0fba78eac7a5.png

image.png.93a776e304adaf5bde72928fe11d23ad.png

Notice the two "Piller" and "bend your course directly in the middle line".

😊

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Hi Yann,

I am not familiar with this work.

This is a remarkable series of links with As You Like It, Henry IV, page 33 (Bacon in simple cipher) and 287 (Fra Rosicrosse) which clearly conveys the cryptic message that Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is the secret author of the Shakespeare works.

You are the only person in the world who is able to repeatedly identify and make these connections!

AWESOME.

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12 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Yann,

I am not familiar with this work.

This is a remarkable series of links with As You Like It, Henry IV, page 33 (Bacon in simple cipher) and 287 (Fra Rosicrosse) which clearly conveys the cryptic message that Francis Bacon, Brother of the Rosy Cross, is the secret author of the Shakespeare works.

You are the only person in the world who is able to repeatedly identify and make these connections!

AWESOME.

Thank you A Phoenix !

To be honest, I have just noticed that this edition was collated in 1904 .

image.png.197a51614d603ea396e0788a65a75f0c.png

https://books.google.fr/books?id=9bw8AAAAYAAJ&pg=RA1-PA290&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=snippet&q=ALBANS&f=false

I think that it does not put in question the "page 32/33" part but it means that the "287" part date from 1904.

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