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Spearshaker – a Film about the Secret Life of Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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PLAYS

KING JOHN

The earliest printed Shakespeare play in which Bacon explores the law of bastardy, in particular royal bastardy, through the most important and largest role in the play, the royal bastard Sir Philip Faulconbridge. The important character Sir Philip Faulconbridge (the rightful heir to the crown) has more lines than any other character and is frequently described as the hero of King John without whom it is said, the play would not exist.

He is penetrating and profound. He sees further and deeper and knows and understands more than the self-serving mortals around and about him. He is present but effortlessly rises above the noise of deceivers and the deluded, at times both visible and invisible, we think we know him, but he always manages to remain elusive. Our author of King John had an unusual and very particular attachment to the name of Faulconbridge on many different levels. The man and name behind the character of the Bastard Sir Philip Faulconbridge has quite simply stared centuries of Shakespearean and Baconian scholarship in the face whose identity is concealed within the first eight letters of the surname Faulconbridge concealing an anagram of F BACON.

 

www.spearshakerproductions.com

https://youtu.be/RNjPKX-1XPA

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On 10/19/2023 at 11:54 PM, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

You are always so kind and generous.

As you can see the posts are under three different headings People, Places and Plays. The first two People and Places were written by Lady Phoenix (who often chides me for being too academic) and I wrote the third section on the Plays which are also without footnotes and references! I deliberately chose to write the Plays section without any kind of bibliographical apparatus to make them more reader friendly and to be honest they were probably shorter because we have a lot on and were a bit pressed for time.

To do full justice to the secret life and times of Lord Bacon in the Shakespeare poems and plays would require a very long full-length work which I estimate would take many years to research, write and fully complete. If only Life was not so short!    

We are busy at the moment putting together the special edition of the Baconiana commemorating the four hundred year anniversary of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. We have had a very heartwarming and generous response from fellow Baconians including you good self from different parts of the world (UK, US, Australia, France and Japan) providing a diverse range of articles and videos relating to the First Folio. 

I am also currently involved in writing two books simultaneously: the one is somewhere near completion which we plan to publish on the 1 January 2024 but regarding the second there is still plenty of work to do! 

Phoenix. 

I can't even read two books simultaneously, let alone write them. 

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PEOPLE

SIR NICHOLAS BACON

Sir Nicholas Bacon was one of the so called new men that appeared in Elizabeth’s reign. His family were Ipswich sheep farmers and at 13 he won a Bible scholarship to Cambridge University followed by legal training at Gray’s Inn. Things may well have turned out differently as he was originally earmarked for the priesthood but decided to run away. He was a learned lawyer and an eloquent and witty speaker as well as being solid, dependable, loyal with a great love of learning and a dedication to the establishing of the Protestant faith in England. He was also kind, fair and generous and pursued moderation and tolerance. His family motto was mediocria firma or moderation is strength and these precepts he followed throughout his life.

The responsibility of fostering a royal Tudor prince with no certainty as to how long this would be for must have been immense, but he never flinched from the duty and he soon became completely enchanted with his young royal charge and was most happy and honoured to be called ‘father’ by Francis. The enmity between Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon together with his brother-in-law Principal Secretary of State Sir William Cecil and the favourite Robert Dudley, was set in motion from the outset of the Elizabethan reign. Both Bacon and Cecil knew of his secret marriage to Queen Elizabeth and his wish to be king and sit on the throne of England and that he posed the most dangerous threat to the security of the nation.
 
Their fears were intensified when in October 1562 Elizabeth suffered a near-fatal bout of small pox and for a time her death seemed inevitable. On what seemed to be her death-bed on briefly regaining consciousness she told her advisers if she did not survive she wanted the favourite Robert Dudley named Lord Protector of the Realm. Elizabeth slowly recovered but her wishes sent shockwaves around the Privy Council with many of them absolutely horrified at the possibility of Dudley being made protector or worse even ascending to the throne. In the parliament of 1563 the critical matter of the succession was debated at great length and a petition urging the queen to (publicly) marry and produce a legitimate heir was conveyed by Lord Keeper Bacon from the House of Lords but as with everything else Elizabeth proved evasive and resistant.
 
But while it was being publicly debated in parliament, the lords more clandestine moves were being secretly set in motion which were at least partly designed to thwart the possibility of Dudley reaching for the helm of the kingdom. There appeared an anonymous tract A Declaration of the Succession of the Crown Imperiall of Ingland which circulated surreptitiously and came to the attention of the queen in the spring of 1564 and she immediately suspected that Sir Nicholas Bacon was directly involved in gathering information and legal opinions for the succession tract and it was alleged by some he had actually written it with the full knowledge and assistance of his brother-in-law Cecil. Whether Bacon wrote the tract he certainly had knowledge of it and the full wrath of Queen Elizabeth fell on him when he was dismissed from the Privy Council and banned from her presence and the royal court. Only Leicester could have brought about Bacon’s disgrace, for few held his such sway over Elizabeth, and none had stronger motives. Leicester sought to strike out against whom he saw as his chief antagonists, William Cecil and Nicholas Bacon.
 
His banishment and exile hit Bacon very hard and caused him to suffer a long period of ill-health and much disquiet of mind. He thought he might never recover Elizabeth’s favour and feared for his political and private ruin not only for himself but the rest of his family with the memory of it living with him for the rest of his life. It would be the spring of 1565 before he was able to regain his position at court and then only slowly did he find himself back in full favour.
 
These had been dark and precarious times for Sir Nicholas Bacon and the rest of the Bacon family and while Francis was only a child he learned of the events and the dire potential consequences of even being associated with any political writings, whether through the medium of prose, poetry or drama, and how just the whiff of suspicion alone could lead to complete professional and private ruin. This important lesson proved a guiding principle for the young Francis and from a young age he took very great care to conceal himself behind the mask of anonymity and various pseudonyms, a method he adopted in composing the greatest literature, poetry and drama known to mankind.
 
When Francis was exiled to France after the catastrophic revelation about his royal birth the Bacons pleaded with Elizabeth that at 15 he was too young and could she re-consider with all pleas falling on royal deaf ears. When Francis was 18 and still in France he had a strange dream that his home Gorhambury was all plastered over with black mortar only to be told days later that Sir Nicholas had died unexpectedly. Francis wondered whether there had been any foul play involved, with his blood father and noted poisoner Dudley firmly in mind as a prime candidate. Francis made the journey across the channel back to England mourning the loss of his great supporter, teacher and true father Sir Nicholas Bacon.

Sir-Nicholas-Bacon.jpg

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PLACES

CANONBURY TOWER

In 1616 Bacon leased Canonbury Tower the oldest building in Islington, London, which still survives intact to the present day. This mysterious building has a long (and much of it) secret history stretching back to before the Norman Conquest. In the earlier Tudor period when the monasteries were dissolved, Henry VIII first granted it to Thomas Cromwell the year before his execution and then to John Dudley, Earl of Warwick (afterwards Duke of Northumberland), father of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, on whose execution in 1553 it reverted back to the crown.

Queen Elizabeth granted it to Lord Wentworth who leased and then sold it to Sir John ‘Rich’ Spencer who amassed one of the largest private fortunes of the period. On his death in 1610, Canonbury passed to his daughter Elizabeth and her husband William, Lord Compton, later first Earl of Northampton. It was Lord and Lady Compton who leased Canonbury to Bacon from 1616 which he used for very secretive purposes during the last decade of his life. Both the Compton Room and Spencer Room in Canonbury Tower are carefully constructed Rosicrucian Temples replete with RC symbols and emblems. This special building is the oldest surviving Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Lodge in the world.
 
Throughout the last decade of his life regular meetings were held at Canonbury Tower by Bacon and his Rosicrucian Brotherhood in the utmost secrecy where plans were discussed for a Universal Reformation of the Whole World.
 
The Tower has many emblems, symbols and signs of a Rosicrucian nature including the figure of a Jester linked to Pan tailpieces in the Shakespeare First Folio and other Baconian works. There are also roses, crosses, acorns, oak leaves and pillars and the sunburst face known to Freemasons as the sun in splendour which appeared on headpieces of the Shakespeare poems and Sonnets and on the memorial verses to Francis Bacon published by his fellow Rosicrucian Brother Dr Rawley containing 32 Latin poems, many of them, alluding to his concealed authorship of the Shakespeare works.
 
It the twentieth century Canonbury Tower was home to the Francis Bacon Society and until recently to the Canonbury Masonic Research Centre. For more than four hundred years it has remained in the ownership of the same family and today is owned by the Marquess Spencer Compton of Northampton.
 
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Inscription of the Kings and Queens of England, Canonbury Tower, Islington, London
 
In the highest room of the Tower painted above the door is a three line list of the Kings and Queens of England from William the Conqueror to Charles I which has been many times restored and re-painted. On the third line following Elizabeth I and before James I there is a section that is missing and has been obliterated but begins with what appears to be according to local historian John Nelson back in 1811 an 'Fr'. This points to Francis who as the eldest son of Elizabeth I was the rightful Tudor heir.
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PLAYS

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

The differences between The Taming of a Shrew first printed in 1594 and The Taming of the Shrew that appeared in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio itself collapses the Stratfordian fraudulent fiction that the illiterate/semi-illiterate William Shakspere (d. 1616) was the author of the Shakespeare works. The two versions of the play share a similar central plot and both have a subplot of romantic intrigue though in A Shew Kate has two sisters and in The Shrew just one. Only Christopher Sly and Kate are used for the names of characters in A Shrew and The Shrew, otherwise all the other characters are given different names, including the central male protagonist who is named Ferando in A Shrew and Petruccio in The Shrew.

Sometime before its publication in the 1623 First Folio Bacon subjected the play to a comprehensive revision most likely shortly before it was printed by the Jaggards, the same family who printed and published several editions of Bacon’s Essays before and after the First Folio.
 
The Taming of the Shrew printed in the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio contains many references to the Bacon family circle. The central character Petruccio is based upon Petruccio Ubaldini the Bacon family calligrapher and scribe. Katherine is partly modelled upon Katherine Cooke Killigrew, Bacon’s maternal aunt and Katherine’s sister is Bianca from which can be derived the anagrammatic contraction AN BAC that clearly suggests the name of Francis Bacon’s mother Anne Bacon, sister of Katherine Killigrew. Petruccio’s father Antonio, is the Italian form of Anthony, the name of Bacon’s beloved brother Anthony Bacon, and two of Petruccio’s servants are named Nicholas and Nathaniel, named after his two elder stepbrothers, Sir Nicholas and Sir Nathaniel Bacon.
 
Surely, it is self-evident that only its true author Bacon who was then alive in 1623 (Shakspere died in 1616; Marlowe in 1593; and Oxford in 1604) was responsible for this radically altered version of the play revised and amended for the publication of the Shakespeare First Folio when virtually all the persons alluded to were dead with the single exception of the ill and dying Sir Nicholas Bacon who died shortly after in 1624.
 
The play is a humorous practical family joke by a philosopher-poet who as Ben Jonson tells us could never pass by a jest. Thus, hidden in plain sight the controversial comedy The Taming of the Shrew was a Bacon family affair, a humorous send-up, written by the supreme family poet, Francis Bacon.

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On 10/20/2023 at 10:02 AM, A Phoenix said:

PEOPLE

ROBERT DEVEREUX, EARL OF ESSEX

The ill-fated Earl was Francis Bacon’s younger brother and clearly the favourite of both his royal mother Elizabeth and father Robert Dudley. In a strange turn of events Dudley became Robert Devereux’s ‘step-father’ when he secretly married his mother Lettice Knollys the Countess of Essex, infuriating the Queen when she eventually found out. Essex inherited his father’s dark good looks, his buccaneering spirit and love of military prowess and aggrandisement which would eventually be his undoing. He was quick to anger and equally quick to forgive, hot headed, reckless but of a generous, loving nature particularly to Francis his concealed brother and Anthony Bacon. Elizabeth doted on him like a wayward child showering him with love, attention and preferments.

After the death of Water Devereux, Essex became a royal ward and at age 11 lived at Burghley House with Bacon’s uncle William Cecil. Essex would have been in regular contact with Francis Bacon and they may well have suspected very early their fraternal bonds. When Bacon discovered the truth of his and Essex’s royal birth they would have obviously discussed their birthrights and Essex would have petitioned Dudley to further their acknowledgement. This was a long running source of conflict between Elizabeth and Dudley and an issue that she had long decided would remain concealed. Essex’s wiser, older brother Francis constantly counselled him about how best to handle the Queen their mother who could be vindictive if she sensed any lack of respect. Essex resembled a young Dudley which both comforted and enraged her depending on her mood.
 
With Francis and Anthony Bacon, Essex ran the English Secret Service from Essex House on the Strand. They headed a vast network of spies, intelligencers, diplomats, and cryptographers in times that were extremely perilous and involved many attempts on their Royal mother’s life. A momentous power struggle began to emerge as Essex became more and more disillusioned in being a concealed Tudor and started to demand his birthright by pressurising Elizabeth into acknowledging her Tudor sons. Whilst Francis in order to follow his love of learning, was prepared to give up his claim to the throne, Essex was not and what followed was quite literally a fight to the death.
 
After an ill-conceived rebellion by Essex, Francis as a legal officer of the crown was forced by a raging Elizabeth to play a part in the legal proceedings against his own brother. He was aware that Elizabeth had always said to Essex that if ever in the darkest of times he asked for pardon from her she would grant it. An inconsolable Elizabeth died two years later after she became aware that Essex had indeed asked her forgiveness but by mischance she had not received the message.

Robert-Devereux-2nd-Earl-of-Essex NPG Under Creative Commons licence.jpg

Hi A Phoenix,

Sorry, I am late but you are too fast ! 😄

Your last great posts reminded me the " Several Letters written by this Honourable Author, to Queen Elizabeth, King James, divers Lords, and others" in Resuscitatio by William Rawley, and the correspondence between Francis Bacon and the Earl of Essex.

Thanks to my reading, yesterday evening, I found a very interesting link between their letters and ... Sonnet 143 of William Shakespeare !

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image.png.f4fec50cc03f4a9db667384612289ccc.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet_143

Detail of old-spelling text

"One of her fethered creatures broake away"

 

 

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Hi Yann,

As you know Yann, the Great One Francis Tudor Bacon and his royal brother Robert Tudor Devereux, second Earl of Essex are talking to each other in a guarded coded language. Of course, Essex knew that Lord Bacon was a secret poet and dramatist concealed behind a range of pseudonyms, including most importantly, the nom de plume of Shakespeare.   

Sonnet 143 is one of my absolute favourites. As soon as you know FB is Shakespeare it all becomes clear text. It is a condesned masterclass in one of his methods of delivery, which beginning with its opening line cryptically conveys the great interlocking secrets of the Elizabethan era.

The carefull housewife Queen Elizabeth secretly married to Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester runs to catch her feathered creature her son and babe Robert Tudor Devereux who has now broken away from her.  It next alludes to their ever changing tempestuous behaviour characterisitic of their mother and child relationship. She eventually made the mistake of not prizing her infants discontent driven by her refusal to publicaly acknowledged that she was his royal mother and his right (following that of FB) to the Crown which eventually culminated in the ill-conceived and ill-fated Essex rebellion. 

While all this time I your eldest son Francis Tudor Bacon, concealed Prince of Wales and rightful heir to the throne, have spent much of my life chasing you pleading with his royal mother to turn back to remember him her eldest son- play the mother's part kiss me, acknowledge, and recognise me, for who I truly am. While all this time he secretly weeps and in silence his heart continues to break over his fate and this is royal tragedy, one of truly Shakespearean proportions.    

 

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Launch of the new website Spearshaker Productions

With over 30 years research into the hidden history of Shakespeare and the Tudor and Jacobean era, Spearshaker Productions produce creative media including future projects for film, network series, documentaries and theatre productions about the secret life and times of Francis Bacon.

‘Knowledge is Power’ was never more fitting than for today and Spearshaker Productions reveals some of history’s most explosive and sensational secrets about Francis Bacon, his concealed royal birth, his authorship of the Shakespeare works, and the Universal Reformation of the Whole World.

Currently exploring the Spearshaker film project with broadcasters, distributors and production companies and seeking interested partners and investors for this exciting new filmic project in development.

‘What do you think you know about history. . .?’

The Spearshaker website is now live www.spearshakerproductions.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC8fQbWsk1AmiTI32B0v_Ew

https://www.facebook.com/spearshaker.productions/

https://twitter.com/spearshaker157

ABOUT IMAGE.jpg

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Launch of the new website Spearshaker Productions

With over 30 years research into the hidden history of Shakespeare and the Tudor and Jacobean era, Spearshaker Productions produce creative media including future projects for film, network series, documentaries and theatre productions about the secret life and times of Francis Bacon.

‘Knowledge is Power’ was never more fitting than for today and Spearshaker Productions reveals some of history’s most explosive and sensational secrets about Francis Bacon, his concealed royal birth, his authorship of the Shakespeare works, and the Universal Reformation of the Whole World.

Currently exploring the Spearshaker film project with broadcasters, distributors and production companies and seeking interested partners and investors for this exciting new filmic project in development.

‘What do you think you know about history. . .?’

The Spearshaker website is now live www.spearshakerproductions.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC8fQbWsk1AmiTI32B0v_Ew

https://www.facebook.com/spearshaker.productions/

https://twitter.com/spearshaker157

ABOUT IMAGE.jpg

Beautiful website ! ❤️

This is a new day which will go down in the Annals.

THANK YOU FOR ALL A PHOENIX !!!

image.png.4dade19c8811f49c906b4198f5efc410.png

 

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11 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Launch of the new website Spearshaker Productions

With over 30 years research into the hidden history of Shakespeare and the Tudor and Jacobean era, Spearshaker Productions produce creative media including future projects for film, network series, documentaries and theatre productions about the secret life and times of Francis Bacon.

‘Knowledge is Power’ was never more fitting than for today and Spearshaker Productions reveals some of history’s most explosive and sensational secrets about Francis Bacon, his concealed royal birth, his authorship of the Shakespeare works, and the Universal Reformation of the Whole World.

Currently exploring the Spearshaker film project with broadcasters, distributors and production companies and seeking interested partners and investors for this exciting new filmic project in development.

‘What do you think you know about history. . .?’

The Spearshaker website is now live www.spearshakerproductions.com

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC8fQbWsk1AmiTI32B0v_Ew

https://www.facebook.com/spearshaker.productions/

https://twitter.com/spearshaker157

ABOUT IMAGE.jpg

So many of us have been waiting so long! Finally!

Bacon has been waiting 400 years and knew A. Phoenix would be here some day! Yay!!

🙂

Thank you A. Phoenix for all you have done and continue to do!!

We are so proud of you!!

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
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Hi Rob,

Thank you for all your enthusiasm, love and support for all our efforts, which we truly appreciate.

As we have said many times before this Baconian journey of ours is a collective one together with you and Lawrence and all the other contributors to B'Hive and sir.bacon.org. 

The Phoenixes.

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PEOPLE

LADY ANNE BACON

Anne Bacon was the daughter of Anthony Cooke and one of nine children. Her father had a very enlightened attitude to his five daughters and ensured that they were taught Latin and Greek to a very high standard receiving an all-round excellent humanist education.

There is no doubt that Francis loved Lady Anne dearly even though she could be an incredibly formidable force to be reckoned with by all accounts. She had been tutor to King Edward VI and Lady in Waiting to Elizabeth so was a trusted, dutiful and discreet courtier and a natural choice as a foster mother following the birth of Francis to her royal mistress. A devout Puritan and extraordinary classics scholar, translator and a learned scholar of the scriptures her erudition was widely admired. She was a fluent speaker and writer of Greek, Latin, Hebrew, French and Italian, skills she passed on to her young sons. Much of Francis and Anthony’s early learning was undertaken by the best scholars of the day and would have been aided and encouraged by Lady Anne and Sir Nicholas.
 
There exists many letters between her and her young sons whilst they were at Cambridge and later at Gray’s Inn. These opinionated missives ranged across many subjects; from current political situations, complex theological arguments to her dislike for their man servants and companions and reprimanding them over their expenditure on stockings, beaver hats, books and lute strings. A particular preoccupation was with their poor health from which they both suffered, especially Anthony with gout and what would probably be recognized now as arthritis. She had a keen interest in plants and their medicinal properties and letters to her sons often contained detailed and prescient advice and recipes for their ailments. Francis and Anthony were actually very familiar with opiate usage and she would certainly not of approved of the many experiments they undertook with their ‘physic’ taking. In order to alleviate the constant pain he endured most of his life, Anthony was a regular opiate user.
 
When Nicholas died in 1579 Lady Anne greatly missed her husband’s solid support and practical amiability. Her increasing garrulous and meddlesome behaviour was no doubt born out of a deep love and concern for her fatherless sons. She petitioned constantly with Elizabeth and her brother in law William Cecil for advancements and preferments for them, largely with little success. Anthony inherited Gorhambury but for a decade was on the continent working for Queen and country leaving Lady Anne to run the estate whilst Francis was studying law at Gray’s Inn. Her tyrannical approach caused many issues with the staff and there was a steady stream of letters from Lady Anne to Anthony demanding his return.
 
The death of Elizabeth in 1603 and succession of James put paid to any slight hopes that Lady Anne had of Francis being acknowledged as a Tudor and she struggled to come to terms with an increasingly confused and lonely existence in a changing world she no longer understood. Unusually for the day, Lady Anne lived into her eighties, dying in 1610 at Gorhambury along with all her memories. With love and gratitude for a woman he was proud to call ‘Mother’ a letter from Francis invites a friend to 'the mournful occasion' of her funeral.

Bacon_Anne_-removebg-preview.png

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PLACES

CANNON ROW, WESTMINSTER, LONDON

7b48b1_12bc7657cfd44fd1877aa134989d96a4~
 
 
Agas Map showing Cannon Row, Westminster
On Cannon Row in Westminster was the home of Sir Edward Hoby son of Elizabeth Cooke Hoby and cousin to Francis Bacon and Robert Cecil. On the 7th of December 1595 Sir Edward Hoby invites his cousin Sir Robert Cecil to his home in Cannon Row for dining and entertainment. ‘I am bold to know whether Tuesday 9 December may be any more in your grace to visit poor Cannon Row where as late as it shall please you a gate for your supper shall be open and K Richard present himself to your view.’ Both Richard II and Richard III were not printed until 1597 but were clearly in dramatic circulation. It would seem likely that Sir Robert Cecil and Sir Edward Hoby's other cousin (and secret Shakespeare) Francis Bacon was also in attendance for drinks and drama at the Cannon Row soiree.
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PLAYS

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA

In the early play The Two Gentlemen of Verona Bacon again names one of his characters Antonio, named after his brother Anthony Bacon, the father of Proteus, one of the two gentlemen of Verona. One of the fables in Bacon’s The Wisdom of the Ancients is ‘Proteus; Or Matter’. In Greek mythology Proteus was able to change his shape at will and adopt different forms and disguises just as Bacon would disguise himself behind his literary mask Shakespeare. In the fable Bacon tells us that Proteus was a thrice excellent prophet for he knew the past, present and the future, who was the keeper and messenger of secrets.

7b48b1_30a9b6a4561f45b8a47a71a2d6d65afe~
The play is a discourse on male friendship with homoerotic undertones within a homosocial structure that formed an important part of the hidden world of Francis and Anthony Bacon who was charged with homosexuality in France which carried the death penalty, only for him to be saved by the intervention of his close friend and confidant King Henry of Navarre. In his essay Of Friendship Bacon observes ‘a friend was far more then himself’, and no one was more of a friend to him, than his brother Anthony Bacon.
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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PEOPLE

LADY ANNE BACON

Anne Bacon was the daughter of Anthony Cooke and one of nine children. Her father had a very enlightened attitude to his five daughters and ensured that they were taught Latin and Greek to a very high standard receiving an all-round excellent humanist education.

There is no doubt that Francis loved Lady Anne dearly even though she could be an incredibly formidable force to be reckoned with by all accounts. She had been tutor to King Edward VI and Lady in Waiting to Elizabeth so was a trusted, dutiful and discreet courtier and a natural choice as a foster mother following the birth of Francis to her royal mistress. A devout Puritan and extraordinary classics scholar, translator and a learned scholar of the scriptures her erudition was widely admired. She was a fluent speaker and writer of Greek, Latin, Hebrew, French and Italian, skills she passed on to her young sons. Much of Francis and Anthony’s early learning was undertaken by the best scholars of the day and would have been aided and encouraged by Lady Anne and Sir Nicholas.
 
There exists many letters between her and her young sons whilst they were at Cambridge and later at Gray’s Inn. These opinionated missives ranged across many subjects; from current political situations, complex theological arguments to her dislike for their man servants and companions and reprimanding them over their expenditure on stockings, beaver hats, books and lute strings. A particular preoccupation was with their poor health from which they both suffered, especially Anthony with gout and what would probably be recognized now as arthritis. She had a keen interest in plants and their medicinal properties and letters to her sons often contained detailed and prescient advice and recipes for their ailments. Francis and Anthony were actually very familiar with opiate usage and she would certainly not of approved of the many experiments they undertook with their ‘physic’ taking. In order to alleviate the constant pain he endured most of his life, Anthony was a regular opiate user.
 
When Nicholas died in 1579 Lady Anne greatly missed her husband’s solid support and practical amiability. Her increasing garrulous and meddlesome behaviour was no doubt born out of a deep love and concern for her fatherless sons. She petitioned constantly with Elizabeth and her brother in law William Cecil for advancements and preferments for them, largely with little success. Anthony inherited Gorhambury but for a decade was on the continent working for Queen and country leaving Lady Anne to run the estate whilst Francis was studying law at Gray’s Inn. Her tyrannical approach caused many issues with the staff and there was a steady stream of letters from Lady Anne to Anthony demanding his return.
 
The death of Elizabeth in 1603 and succession of James put paid to any slight hopes that Lady Anne had of Francis being acknowledged as a Tudor and she struggled to come to terms with an increasingly confused and lonely existence in a changing world she no longer understood. Unusually for the day, Lady Anne lived into her eighties, dying in 1610 at Gorhambury along with all her memories. With love and gratitude for a woman he was proud to call ‘Mother’ a letter from Francis invites a friend to 'the mournful occasion' of her funeral.

Bacon_Anne_-removebg-preview.png

During the height of the Reformation, opium was reintroduced into European medical literature by Paracelsus as laudanum. These black pills or "Stones of Immortality" were made of opium thebaicum, citrus juice and quintessence of gold and prescribed as painkillers.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/heroin/etc/history.html

Opium was widely used in Englandby the 14th century for its ability to induce sleep. William Shakespeare famously wrote in his play Othello:

‘Not poppy, nor mandragore,

Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world,

Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep,

Which thou ow’dst yesterday.’

Laudanum, a mixture of opium, water and alcohol, eventually became the most widely used preparation of opium, and the most abundant in the Science Museum’s collections. The term was first coined in the 16th century by the Italian botanist Paracelsus, who called his own pill-like laudanum preparation ‘the stone of immortality’. The drug was made famous by the English physician John Sydenham in 1660. Sydenham’s liquid laudanum, opium combined with sherry, instantly became popular as a cure-all for pain and other complaints. As Sydenham himself said of the drug, ‘Medicine would be a cripple without it…’

https://blog.sciencemuseum.org.uk/the-addictive-history-of-medicine-opium-the-ancient-drug-of-choice/

Edited by Eric Roberts
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PEOPLE

ANTHONY BACON

Anthony was described by Francis as his comfort and consort and the Bacon brothers although not biological brothers had a love and bond that far transcended blood. They shared the same philosophical beliefs and outlooks and together implemented the revolutionary vision of the advancement of learning that took hold of Francis while a young boy. All their early years were spent together learning, loving, laughing at York House in London amongst the hustle and bustle of court life and at the relative peace and freedom of Gorhambury which was an idyllic Academy of Learning. Both boys loved music and Anthony was apparently an accomplished lute player judging by the amount of lute strings that were purchased in later days at Cambridge. They soaked up the wide learning and many books that were housed in the amazing Gorhambury library. They would have been compelled to read many theological tracts as well as Lady Ann’s own scripture translations. Their Uncle Thomas Hoby had translated Castiglione’s The Courtier which was no doubt a racier read and would have been consumed surreptitiously by the young boys as it would certainly not have met with Lady Anne’s puritanical approval. Like his brother Francis, Anthony was accomplished in languages, cryptography and code breaking, the classics, mythology, rhetoric, oratory and loved poetry and drama. He was also very personable, solid and discreet as evidenced by his success as an intelligencer and his wide reaching and diverse correspondents which included the King of Navarre, James VI of Scotland, Theodore Beza and Michel de Montaigne.

The revelation of Francis’ true birth when they were teenagers could not break the ties they had, if anything it strengthened them with Anthony forming a deep hatred and suspicion of Elizabeth for her treatment of Francis and a determination to avoid her at all costs which he managed to do throughout his life. Through political and religious upheavals, Sir Nicholas’ death and their separation whilst they travelled abroad working for the crown and state, the brothers were in constant contact in letters through a complex code system that like their close enduring bond no one else could break. When Anthony returned from abroad and they were reunited they were for always in each other’s company and along with Essex they formed an unusual trio of brothers working closely together at Essex House on the Strand, Headquarters of the English Secret Service.
 
Aside from Francis, Essex was the one person in his life that Anthony was completely devoted to and Essex’s rebellion and subsequent execution caused heartbreak to an already ailing Anthony and he dies shortly after. Whilst Queen Elizabeth spared no expense on her magnificent clothes, jewels, sumptuous banquets, entertainments and progresses, she was notoriously mercenary when it came to funding the efforts of those who spent their lives in the pursuit of keeping her and the state safe. Anthony’s previous master Sir Francis Walsingham had died penniless and this now was the fate of Anthony who along with Francis had spent their own fortunes on state work and the publishing of works from their scriptorium at Twickenham Lodge. Bed bound and paralysed by pain, Anthony died in a shabby rented house in Crutched Friars by Tower Hill no doubt with a desolate Francis by his side.

Anthony-Bacon.jpg

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PLACES

ESSEX HOUSE

Built around 1575 for Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, Essex House was originally called Leicester House. It was situated on the Strand and was a large impressive house with chapel, extensive gardens and around 42 bedrooms. When Francis Bacon returned home from the continent in 1579 he lived here for a short while with his blood father Robert Dudley, along with Dudley’s nephew and Bacon’s blood cousin Sir Philip Sidney. Here the young cousins along with others held meetings of a group called The Areopagus for discussions about philosophy, poetry, drama and literature.

 
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Essex House, The Strand, London
 

Following the death of Robert Dudley in 1588, his younger favourite royal son Robert Devereux, second Earl of Essex inherited the grand stately residence and it became known as Essex House. After a twelve year absence abroad working closely with spymaster Walsingham, Anthony Bacon returned to England in February 1592. With Walsingham dead, the headquarters of the English Secret Service was transferred to Essex House on the Strand, where Francis personally introduced Anthony to Essex, interlocking their destinies for the next decade. Under the roof of Essex House, Francis and Anthony Bacon ran a vast domestic and foreign intelligence network of spies and intelligencers operating across the European continent. Working out of Gray’s Inn, Twickenham Lodge and Essex House, Francis and Anthony also set up a literary workshop with established connections to English printers and publishers employing writers, translators, scribes and copyists for distribution of private manuscripts, books, plays, masques and other entertainments.

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PLAYS

ROMEO AND JULIET

As with The Taming of the Shrew one of the characters in the supreme love story Romeo and Juliet is named Petruccio after Petruccio Ubaldini, the Bacon family calligraphist and illuminator.

The three years Bacon spent in France are to the present day still shrouded in secrecy largely on account of his royal birth and his concealed authorship of the Shakespeare poems and plays-several of which are partly based in or relate to the French kingdom: Loves Labours Lost, King John, I Henry VI, 3 Henry VI, Henry V, Alls Well That Ends Well and As You Like It. Later in life Bacon accounted his years in France to have been the most formative of his personal and intellectual development in a kingdom with which he fell in love, as well as falling in love with its princess, Marguerite de Valois, his Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, inspiring the most famous play about love in the history of the world. The complex and heartbreaking love affair between Bacon and Marguerite colours the very fabric of Romeo and Juliet later echoed in Troilus and Cressida and the subject of several of his Shakespeare sonnets.

R AND J.jpg

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12 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The revelation of Francis’ true birth when they were teenagers could not break the ties they had, if anything it strengthened them with Anthony forming a deep hatred and suspicion of Elizabeth for her treatment of Francis and a determination to avoid her at all costs which he managed to do throughout his life. Through political and religious upheavals, Sir Nicholas’ death and their separation whilst they travelled abroad working for the crown and state, the brothers were in constant contact in letters through a complex code system that like their close enduring bond no one else could break. When Anthony returned from abroad and they were reunited they were for always in each other’s company and along with Essex they formed an unusual trio of brothers working closely together at Essex House on the Strand, Headquarters of the English Secret Service.

This will be the biggest movie ever made! Star Wars was nothing! Wizard of Oz, poo poo. Barbie? LOL

Spearshaker will Pierce the major motion Veil forever. After this Academy award winning movie breaks records and is on demand forever, the Whole Wide World will know who Bacon was, and will laugh at the Willy character in the movie. Jono as Bacon! I am so proud to know Jono even a little today! 🙂

A. Phoenix, you have actual historical evidence in abundance you have collected supporting what Bacon's hints, clues, and ciphers describe in detail.

Happy 400 year anniversary coming up for Bacon's First Folio! 🙂

 

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PEOPLE

WILLIAM CECIL, LORD BURGHLEY

William Cecil along with Nicholas Bacon were the grand architects of the Elizabethan Protestant Reformation and were the two most powerful and important figures of Elizabeth’s reign. Along with his brother in law Sir Nicholas Bacon, Cecil was a key conspirator to the secrecy of Bacon’s birth and the resulting aftermath. It was not just a case of an inconvenient pregnancy and birth, it was a huge state secret and one that had the most serious implications in the precarious world of Elizabethan politics where the Protestant religion was still new and there were enemies all around. Cecil or Burghley as he later became was a loyal and measured stateman with a strong sense of duty. Cecil was married to Lady Anne’s older sister Mildred who was like all her siblings educated to a very high standard by their father Anthony Cooke. Cecil appears to have married the more calm and measured sister compared to the opinionated Lady Anne Bacon and Elizabeth Hoby Russell. Mildred did much work with the underprivileged and was a kind, calm presence to her nephew Francis Bacon.

Along with Dr Dee, Walsingham and Sir Nicholas Bacon, Burghley masterminded the early intelligence service networks and was responsible for surreptitiously printing many propaganda pamphlets against the Catholic church. He was a shrewd and sharp operator with an intense eye for detail bordering on pedantry, attributes that Francis portrayed in Gertrude’s advisor Polonius in Hamlet.
 
Burghley’s relationship with his nominal nephew Francis Bacon was a complex one. Following his brother in law Sir Nicholas’ death he had promised he would be a supporting father figure but this posed problems. On the one hand he greatly admired his young witty, learned, charismatic and quite brilliant nephew. On the other hand his true identity caused a very real threat to the Protestant reformation and Robert Dudley was a very divisive figure although hated by the people and nobility alike, how would he be accepted? And the young prince, how could the conception out of wedlock be explained, how could the timing with Amy Robsart’s tragic death be presented. The whole situation was a monumental mess and tested even Burghley’s patience and loyalty. And then of course there was also his own son Robert Cecil’s future titles and preferments to consider, he must not be overlooked in any way.
 
It was to Burghley that Bacon finally renounced the crown and assured him that it was not something he any longer hoped for as his purpose in life had taken another turn. He was, he told Burghley to ‘take all knowledge to be his province’ as he had seen that the world was grossly deficient and ignorant in many areas and that he was to dedicate his life to a reformation of the whole world for the expressed betterment of humankind. Burghley was no doubt relieved as the awkward and dangerous ‘great issue’ had long being hanging in the air. Relief too for Elizabeth, as she had always been suspicious of Francis’ intentions regarding the Crown when in fact she should have paid more attention to her other son Essex in this regard. She had deliberately withheld all honours and legal positions from Francis, was this because she initially planned a higher honour for him or was she in fact just keeping him in check?
 
Besides dealing with ‘the great issue’, Burghley was a solid and dependable councillor who had worked tirelessly for Queen, country and the Protestant faith (and himself of course). Elizabeth repaid Burghley’s steadfast loyalty, dedication and discretion to her and England by rewarding him with extreme wealth, power and privileges that were to be passed down to his son Robert and his heirs.
 
 

William-Cecil-1st-Baron-Burghley.jpg

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PLACES

GIDEA HALL

7b48b1_21862f3901dd4159835b629476511f2a~
 
 
Gidea Hall, Romford 1500s
 

Gidea Hall was the home of Lady Anne Bacon’s father Anthony Cooke, tutor to Elizabeth’s brother Edward VI. A manor house in Gidea Park East Romford, Gidea Hall was historically in the county of Essex and it was here that Lady Anne and her brothers and sisters would receive their excellent and progressive education. In 1568 Queen Elizabeth visited on one of her famed progresses and it would have been a place that young Anthony and Francis would visit to see their well-connected and forward thinking grandfather. The house underwent many re-builds and changes and was finally demolished in 1930.

 
 
 
 
 
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PLAYS

HENRY VI PART 1

At Gray’s Inn during the late 1580s and early 1590s Bacon began writing the War of the Roses plays I Henry VI, 2 Henry VI, 3 Henry VI and Richard III, otherwise known as the first Shakespeare tetralogy. In the Temple Garden scene of I Henry VI he reveals his intimate familiarity with the habits and life of the Inns of Court.

 
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In this invented scene Bacon portrays the War of Roses between the Houses of Lancaster and York as having its nascent beginnings in a dispute between some young noblemen studying law, arguing over an obscure legal point, in a passage containing technical legal language, set in the Temple Gardens. In addition to the scene with its ready familiarity with the life and habits of the Inns of Court, references and allusions to the law run throughout the whole of the play from the first Act till the last.

https://www.spearshakerproductions.com

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5 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PLACES

GIDEA HALL

7b48b1_21862f3901dd4159835b629476511f2a~
 
 
Gidea Hall, Romford 1500s
 

Gidea Hall was the home of Lady Anne Bacon’s father Anthony Cooke, tutor to Elizabeth’s brother Edward VI. A manor house in Gidea Park East Romford, Gidea Hall was historically in the county of Essex and it was here that Lady Anne and her brothers and sisters would receive their excellent and progressive education. In 1568 Queen Elizabeth visited on one of her famed progresses and it would have been a place that young Anthony and Francis would visit to see their well-connected and forward thinking grandfather. The house underwent many re-builds and changes and was finally demolished in 1930.

 
 
 
 
 

ScreenShot2023-10-24at11_42_24pm.png.6e4092c084f4730785ffb5619f8ed3da.png

Gidea Hall, woodblock engraving by landscaper and artist, Humphrey Repton, 1797

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6 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

PEOPLE

WILLIAM CECIL, LORD BURGHLEY

William Cecil along with Nicholas Bacon were the grand architects of the Elizabethan Protestant Reformation and were the two most powerful and important figures of Elizabeth’s reign. Along with his brother in law Sir Nicholas Bacon, Cecil was a key conspirator to the secrecy of Bacon’s birth and the resulting aftermath. It was not just a case of an inconvenient pregnancy and birth, it was a huge state secret and one that had the most serious implications in the precarious world of Elizabethan politics where the Protestant religion was still new and there were enemies all around. Cecil or Burghley as he later became was a loyal and measured stateman with a strong sense of duty. Cecil was married to Lady Anne’s older sister Mildred who was like all her siblings educated to a very high standard by their father Anthony Cooke. Cecil appears to have married the more calm and measured sister compared to the opinionated Lady Anne Bacon and Elizabeth Hoby Russell. Mildred did much work with the underprivileged and was a kind, calm presence to her nephew Francis Bacon.

Along with Dr Dee, Walsingham and Sir Nicholas Bacon, Burghley masterminded the early intelligence service networks and was responsible for surreptitiously printing many propaganda pamphlets against the Catholic church. He was a shrewd and sharp operator with an intense eye for detail bordering on pedantry, attributes that Francis portrayed in Gertrude’s advisor Polonius in Hamlet.
 
Burghley’s relationship with his nominal nephew Francis Bacon was a complex one. Following his brother in law Sir Nicholas’ death he had promised he would be a supporting father figure but this posed problems. On the one hand he greatly admired his young witty, learned, charismatic and quite brilliant nephew. On the other hand his true identity caused a very real threat to the Protestant reformation and Robert Dudley was a very divisive figure although hated by the people and nobility alike, how would he be accepted? And the young prince, how could the conception out of wedlock be explained, how could the timing with Amy Robsart’s tragic death be presented. The whole situation was a monumental mess and tested even Burghley’s patience and loyalty. And then of course there was also his own son Robert Cecil’s future titles and preferments to consider, he must not be overlooked in any way.
 
It was to Burghley that Bacon finally renounced the crown and assured him that it was not something he any longer hoped for as his purpose in life had taken another turn. He was, he told Burghley to ‘take all knowledge to be his province’ as he had seen that the world was grossly deficient and ignorant in many areas and that he was to dedicate his life to a reformation of the whole world for the expressed betterment of humankind. Burghley was no doubt relieved as the awkward and dangerous ‘great issue’ had long being hanging in the air. Relief too for Elizabeth, as she had always been suspicious of Francis’ intentions regarding the Crown when in fact she should have paid more attention to her other son Essex in this regard. She had deliberately withheld all honours and legal positions from Francis, was this because she initially planned a higher honour for him or was she in fact just keeping him in check?
 
Besides dealing with ‘the great issue’, Burghley was a solid and dependable councillor who had worked tirelessly for Queen, country and the Protestant faith (and himself of course). Elizabeth repaid Burghley’s steadfast loyalty, dedication and discretion to her and England by rewarding him with extreme wealth, power and privileges that were to be passed down to his son Robert and his heirs.
 
 

William-Cecil-1st-Baron-Burghley.jpg

 

1_Front-of-Burghley-House.jpg.webp.a248c08b1c083a30e13bdfae947cd0a5.webp

 

Drone shots of Burghley House: https://www.stamfordmercury.co.uk/news/burghley-house-as-youve-never-seen-it-before-9300099/

image.jpeg.b21433a79358739626b171f2215af781.jpeg

098-1.jpg.10d52728ac61abc19e3856c7cf0e2c6a.jpg

098-1.jpg.10d52728ac61abc19e3856c7cf0e2c6a.jpg

Fully (body off) restored by Jody Klein (on the right above), John Lennon's white 1965 Phantom V Rolls-Royce won first prize at the Rolls-Royce Enthusiast's Club annual gathering in 2016 in the grounds of Burghley House. Finding this historic car (which Lennon bought second hand from a dealer in Chelsea as a means of secretly conducting his affair with Ono throughout 1967) became an obsession until I finally tracked it down to Rolls-Royce and Bentley Garages in Bromsgrove and made contact with the person supervising the restoration. He sent me dozens of photos of the re-build, which no one has ever seen because I knew that Jody was a very private guy and didn't want publicity. http://www.60x50.com/search/label/John Lennon

Sorry to digress...

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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