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To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon


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AA Headpiece

The original edition of A Boke named Tectonicon by Leonard Digges (the grandfather of Dudley and Leonard) whose special patron was Nicholas Bacon was reprinted in 1605 where above the address ‘L[eonard] D[igges] To the Reader’ (reprinted from its first edition) appears

a Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece confirming that Bacon was behind its publication.

Leonard Digges, A Booke Named Tectonicon…Published by Leonard Digges Gentleman, in the yeere of our Lord, 1556 (London: printed by Felix Kyngston, 1605), A2r

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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4 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Family Connections

There is another very important piece of information not recorded in the extensive Bacon biographical canon. At some unknown date Digges married Anne, daughter of Sir Warham St Leger and his wife Ursula, daughter of George Neville, Lord Abergavenny. This means Digges and Bacon were related. Sir Henry Neville (d.1593) who was ‘descended of the Nevilles at Abergavenny’ was married to Sir Nicholas Bacon’s eldest daughter Elizabeth, Bacon’s elder sister; and his son and namesake the courtier and diplomat Sir Henry Neville (1561/2-1615) married Anne, daughter of Sir Henry Killigrew and his wife Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew, the younger sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon. During the 1590s Sir Henry Neville the younger moved in the Bacon-Essex circles in and around Essex House on the Strand. His nephew Sir Henry Neville makes an appearance on the outer cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS known as the Northumberland Manuscript which originally held copies of his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

Sidney Lee, Thomas Digges (d. 1595), Dictionary of National Biography states she was the ‘daughter of George Neville, lord Abergavenny’ and Leslie Hotson, I, William Shakespeare Do Appoint Thomas Russell Esquire (London: Jonathan Cape, 1937), p. 126 states Agnes was ‘the granddaughter of George Neville, Lord Abergavenny’; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 152-53; Leslie Hotson, I, William Shakespeare Do Appoint Thomas Russell Esquire (London: Jonathan Cape, 1937), p. 126; M. Greengrass, Sir Henry Neville (1561/2-1615), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23); Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune: The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), pp. 84, 239 248, 346, 351

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 12.png

Portrait of Sir Henry Neville 1599 Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Henry_Neville_1599.jpeg.1f8987349dcb62055c094a4cda87abe0.jpeg

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_29_43pm.png.63a05896c51bac8305823d0e969806e5.png

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_30_35pm.png.2cab7f6bfc04a2d80ad6b67960282bfe.png

Would anyone like to offer any suggestions as to the meaning of the mysterious circular diagram/symbol above, as well as an English translation of what looks to me like a Greek inscription. (I'm afraid my Greek's a little rusty.)

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_31_02pm.png.823000cda8606d48f2888c9faea78738.png

Gheeraerts has used a coarsely woven canvass to create a 'pointilist' micro-grid only visible at extreme close range.

Edited by Eric Roberts
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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

AA Headpiece

The original edition of A Boke named Tectonicon by Leonard Digges (the grandfather of Dudley and Leonard) whose special patron was Nicholas Bacon was reprinted in 1605 where above the address ‘L[eonard] D[igges] To the Reader’ (reprinted from its first edition) appears

a Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece confirming that Bacon was behind its publication.

Leonard Digges, A Booke Named Tectonicon…Published by Leonard Digges Gentleman, in the yeere of our Lord, 1556 (London: printed by Felix Kyngston, 1605), A2r

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 15.png

ScreenShot2023-09-01at9_06_47pm.png.3bad4a8c7c11548e06b77b36061ec3ae.png

 

A booke named Tectonicon: https://archive.org/details/bookenamedtecton00digg/page/n19/mode/2up?view=theater

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16 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Portrait of Sir Henry Neville 1599 Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Henry_Neville_1599.jpeg.1f8987349dcb62055c094a4cda87abe0.jpeg

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_29_43pm.png.63a05896c51bac8305823d0e969806e5.png

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_30_35pm.png.2cab7f6bfc04a2d80ad6b67960282bfe.png

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_31_02pm.png.823000cda8606d48f2888c9faea78738.png

Gheeraerts has used a coarsely woven canvass to create a 'pointilist' micro-grid only visible at extreme close range.

Another Portrait of Sir Henry Neville, inscribed 1596. Attributed to the school of George Gower.

SirHenryNevillebyUnknown.jpeg.6190fe73d143342f7c0080f49ba6a124.jpeg

 

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6 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Portrait of Sir Henry Neville 1599 Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Henry_Neville_1599.jpeg.1f8987349dcb62055c094a4cda87abe0.jpeg

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_29_43pm.png.63a05896c51bac8305823d0e969806e5.png

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_30_35pm.png.2cab7f6bfc04a2d80ad6b67960282bfe.png

Would anyone like to offer any suggestions as to the meaning of the mysterious circular diagram/symbol above, as well as an English translation of what looks to me like a Greek inscription. (I'm afraid my Greek's a little rusty.)

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_31_02pm.png.823000cda8606d48f2888c9faea78738.png

Gheeraerts has used a coarsely woven canvass to create a 'pointilist' micro-grid only visible at extreme close range.

The image seems to be of a two positions of the Sun which is pictured on its own epicycle in two opposing positions relative to Earth, offering an explanation for the same view of the Sun. The two polar opposite locations  seem to be equated as the Greek speaks of "ubiquity of God's .... something" (likely a scientific term, or terms). That's my quick take.

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Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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BACON-SHAKESPEARE AND HIS BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE

For knowledgeable and detailed discussions of the Baconian AA headpiece see the following:

William T. Smedley, The Mystery Of Francis Bacon (London: Robert Banks & Son, 1912), 'How Bacon Marked Books with the Publication of Which He Was Connected', pp. 132-39. 

Peter Dawkins, Arcadia: The Life and Times of Francis Bacon (The Francis Bacon Research Trust, 1988), pp. 181-206, and passim.    

Peter Dawkins, The Shakespeare Enigma (London: Polair Publishing, 2004), pp. 332-36.

Peter Dawkins, 'The Shakespeare Gemini Headpieces-the Key to Shakespeare', pp. 1-12.

https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/The_Shakespeare_Gemini_Headpieces.pdf

For the fullest list to date of works with the the AA Headpiece see Mather Walker, Plus Ultra: Francis Bacon's Design In His "Shakespeare" First Folio (2012), pp. 820-67.

https://sirbacon.org/archives/PLUS ULTRA - w4 w ToC.pdf

A. Phoenix, The Fraudulent Friedmans: The Bacon Ciphers in the Shakespeare Works (2022), pp. 33-38.

A. Phoenix, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion (2023), 'The Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic AA Headpiece in the Shakespeare Quartos and Folios', pp. 206-38.

A. Phoenix, 'The Baconian-Rosicrucian AA Headpieces in Editions of Shakespeare Poems, Quartos, & Folios' 

https://sirbacon.org/bacon-forum/index.php?/topic/93-the-baconian-rosicrucian-aa-headpieces-in-editions-of-shakespeare-poems-quartos-folios/

For around 30 articles on the AA Headpiece, etc, see A. M. Challinor, ed., Francis Bacon: Philosopher, Statesman, Poet An Index to Baconiana (The Francis Bacon Society, 2001), pp. 96-97.   

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30 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

BACON-SHAKESPEARE AND HIS BACONIAN-ROSICRUCIAN AA HEADPIECE

For knowledgeable and detailed discussions of the Baconian AA headpiece see the following:

William T. Smedley, The Mystery Of Francis Bacon (London: Robert Banks & Son, 1912), 'How Bacon Marked Books with the Publication of Which He Was Connected', pp. 132-39. 

Peter Dawkins, Arcadia: The Life and Times of Francis Bacon (The Francis Bacon Research Trust, 1988), pp. 181-206, and passim.    

Peter Dawkins, The Shakespeare Enigma (London: Polair Publishing, 2004), pp. 332-36.

Peter Dawkins, 'The Shakespeare Gemini Headpieces-the Key to Shakespeare', pp. 1-12.

https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/The_Shakespeare_Gemini_Headpieces.pdf

For the fullest list to date of works with the the AA Headpiece see Mather Walker, Plus Ultra: Francis Bacon's Design In His "Shakespeare" First Folio (2012), pp. 820-67.

https://sirbacon.org/archives/PLUS ULTRA - w4 w ToC.pdf

A. Phoenix, The Fraudulent Friedmans: The Bacon Ciphers in the Shakespeare Works (2022), pp. 33-38.

A. Phoenix, The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion (2023), 'The Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic AA Headpiece in the Shakespeare Quartos and Folios', pp. 206-38.

For around 30 articles on the AA Headpiece, etc, see A. M. Challinor, ed., Francis Bacon: Philosopher, Statesman, Poet An Index to Baconiana (The Francis Bacon Society, 2001), pp. 96-97.   

You are making that claim in this case now. Justify it and stop hiding behind references to people who quote no one but those who quote themselves making suggestions. There is no proof of a Baconian-Rosicrucian tie based in this headpiece. That is bad syllogism. It's just one occurrence which appears on the list that I linked to. For you, it may be certain because it could be true and it is useful. That is not proof of anything. What we have here is a conclusion wanting to strengthen itself in the world with a bad syllogism. If those can work as proof then what is the point of ever bothering, with great effort, to get to points of knowledge? We should just settle on what could work as an explanation if we were right and call that newly gained knowledge. It's not that easy, and no one gets a free pass. 

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7 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Portrait of Sir Henry Neville 1599 Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Henry_Neville_1599.jpeg.1f8987349dcb62055c094a4cda87abe0.jpeg

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_29_43pm.png.63a05896c51bac8305823d0e969806e5.png

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_30_35pm.png.2cab7f6bfc04a2d80ad6b67960282bfe.png

Would anyone like to offer any suggestions as to the meaning of the mysterious circular diagram/symbol above, as well as an English translation of what looks to me like a Greek inscription. (I'm afraid my Greek's a little rusty.)

ScreenShot2023-09-01at8_31_02pm.png.823000cda8606d48f2888c9faea78738.png

Gheeraerts has used a coarsely woven canvass to create a 'pointilist' micro-grid only visible at extreme close range.

Hi Eric,

Here is an interesting link  :  http://kenfeinstein.blogspot.com/2021/07/the-greek-inscription-on-henry-nevilles.html

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6 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

You are making that claim in this case now. Justify it and stop hiding behind references to people who quote no one but those who quote themselves making suggestions. There is no proof of a Baconian-Rosicrucian tie based in this headpiece. That is bad syllogism. It's just one occurrence which appears on the list that I linked to. For you, it may be certain because it could be true and it is useful. That is not proof of anything. What we have here is a conclusion wanting to strengthen itself in the world with a bad syllogism. If those can work as proof then what is the point of ever bothering, with great effort, to get to points of knowledge? We should just settle on what could work as an explanation if we were right and call that newly gained knowledge. It's not that easy, and no one gets a free pass. 

A Phoenix gives references allowing everyone to read about the subject, to understand why they are making that claim, and to make up her/his own mind.

Here is another reference :

Peter Dawkins, "The Secret Signature."

https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/The_Secret_Signature.pdf

For me, all begins with W.T. Smedley and his book " The Mystery of Francis Bacon".

https://sirbacon.org/mysteryoffrancis00smed.pdf

The Chapter which interests us starts on page 132.

And here is what would certainly be for you the first suggestion :

"The first occasion upon which this device was used appears to be in a book so rare that no copy of it can be found, either in the British Museum or the Bodleian Library. Unfortunately, in the copy belonging to the writer, the title-page and the two first pages are missing. The work is called " Hebraicum Alphabethum Jo. Bovlaese." It is a Hebrew Grammar, with proof-sheets added. It is interleaved with sheets of Englishmade paper, containing Bacon's handwriting. Bound up with it is another Hebrew Grammar, similarly interleaved, called " Sive compendium, quintacunque Ratione fieri potuit amplessimum, Totius linguae," published in Paris in 1566. The book ends with the sentence : " Ex Collegio Montis—Acuti 20 Decembris 1576 " ; then follow two pages in Hebrew, with the Latin translation over it, headed "Decern Proecepta decalogi Exod." Over this is the design containing the light A and the dark A, and the squirrel and rabbits. One thing is certain, that the copy now referred to was in the possession of Bacon, and that the interleaved sheets of paper contain his handwriting, in which have been added page by page the equivalents of the Hebrew in Greek, Chaldaeic, Syriac and Arabic.

The facts are that :

Smedley told the truth about  Hebraicum Alphabethum Jo. Bovlaese

https://books.google.bj/books?id=YPo-2TT5lHUC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_atb#v=onepage&q&f=false

He could not know (as the two first pages of his copy were missing) that there was also a AA headpiece at the beginning of the book.

He told the truth about Sive compendium, quintacunque Ratione fieri potuit amplessimum, Totius linguae

https://books.google.fr/books?id=O2ilxPrFvysC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

And he told the truth about the copy belonging to the writer.

https://collections.folger.edu/detail/Boulaeze-Jean-K-CC-A3itsur-siue-Compendium-quantacunque-ratione-fieri-potuit-amplissimum-totius-linguae-sanctae/44bdb17b-91a9-4c4c-a793-1e8b1c9cd21c

Notice the "item information" given by the Folger Shakespeare Library ...

"... Interleaved with numerous manuscript grammatical tables in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew in an early hand. Manuscript notes and underscoring throughout text. Letterpress leaves of Greek verb conjugation tables bound in. Bookplate: Ex libris W.T. Smedley.

One suggestion remains ... that the handwriting is the one of Francis Bacon, inducing that the copy was in possession of Bacon.

I can't make my own idea without seeing this handwriting but, I give W.T. Smedley the benefice of the doubt.

One last thing ...

W.T. Smedley writes that

"The first occasion upon which this device was used appears to be in a book so rare ..."

In 1912, there was no internet.

Based on the idea that the AA headpiece found in "Hebraicum Alphabeticum" could be link to Martinum Juvenem (Martin Le Jeune) the printer of the Book,

I discovered an older book, published in 1567, in which the same AA headpiece appears...

"Chronographia in duos libros distincta."

https://books.google.fr/books?id=qe6bHUv9BJ4C&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Thus, this first AA headpiece  was not per se a "Baconian" Headpiece.

But the fact is that the first appearence in England of this AA Headpiece seems to be in De Rep. Anglorum Instaurada in 1579,

which coincide with Francis Bacon's return to England after living for 3 years in France.

And Smedley mentions in his book the migration of woodblocks :

"Mr. Charles T. Jacob, Chiswick Press, London, who is the author of " Books and Printing " (London, 1902), and several works on typography, referring to an article on the migration of woodblocks, said : It is a well-known fact to Bibliographers that the same blocks were sometimes used by different printers in two places quite far apart, and at various intervals during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. That the same blocks were employed is apparent from a comparison of technical defects of impressions taken at different places, and at two periods. There was no method of duplication in existence until stereotyping was first invented in 1725 ; even then the details were somewhat crude, and the process being new, it met with much opposition and was practically not adopted until the early part of the nineteenth century, Electrotyping, which is the ideal method of reproducing woodblocks, was not introduced until 1836 or there-abouts. Of course, it was quite possible to re-engrave the same design, but absolute fidelity could not be relied on by these means, even if executed by the same hand."

The "Grail" AA Headpiece ( the one that appears above the adress "L.D. To the Reader " in the Tectonicon) seems to be found only in Books printed in England.

This one, in my view and on the basis of my current knowledge, is a Baconian Headpiece.

Edit :

I forgot to mention that in "Hebraicum Alphabethum" the two AA Headpieces are on page 2 and 31.

2 + 31 = 33

 😉 

 

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Hi Yann, Very High Wizard of B'Hive,

WOW, WOW, WOW!

This is truly groundbreaking research that confirms through the reproduction of primary documentation/printed works the statements made by Smedley and with the reproduction of the  previously unknown and extremely rare 1567 edition, you carry our knowledge much further down an important road in Baconian-Shakespearean-Rosicrucian scholarship.

Absolute Masterclass.

Take a bow Maestro.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Yann

Thank you for the link explaining the inscription in the magnificent portrait of Sir Henry Neville by Marcus Gheeraerts. You demonstrate, yet again, the collaborative spirit and constructive sharing of ideas and information practiced in this forum from the start. Everything you post is revealing in a positive way. Which is why we appreciate you so much. I think I speak for everyone on this forum in this regard. Our gratitude to A Phoenix also knows no bounds. Flippant and faulty logic will never unseat our champion researcher. Any who try to dismount him will be left marooned on an isolated island, with only the sound of their own voice to console them. Come on CJ or whatever your name is. Let's all work together.

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Digges Early Life

For someone so inextricably linked to Shakespeare or to be more precise the First Folio and the important 1640 edition of the Shakespeare Poems there is to the present day (as we have seen) very little known about Leonard Digges. His brief entry in the Dictionary of National Biography amounts to a single paragraph and its revised version in the ODNB (2004-23) to less than a single page. As with his brother we have no information of his early life or education. At the age of fifteen he went to University College, Oxford in 1603 and graduated with Bachelor of Arts in October 1606. Having left Oxford he shortly after travelled abroad for a period of study in foreign universities which may have included some secret courier work on behalf of Bacon carrying information and intelligence as well as manuscripts and books to printers and publishers, and members of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

  

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Digges, Mabbe & Digby

In 1611 it appears Digges went to Spain with his friend James Mabbe, fellow of Magdalen College, Oxford and secretary to the English ambassador Sir John Digby, one of Bacon’s close friends and political allies. The evidence for his trip to Spain comes from a copy of a third edition of Lope de Vega’s Rimas printed at Madrid in 1613, now housed in the library of Balliol College, Oxford which Mabbe, who also contributed a verse to the First Folio, sent via Digges to another Oxford scholar, William Baker.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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Translator Digges

This is the only information we have of Digges from the time of taking his degree at Oxford in 1606 until eleven years later in 1617 when he issued a verse translation from Claudianus’s The Rape of Proserpine published by Edward Blount, publisher of the Shakespeare First Folio. It is dedicated to his sister Margaret Digges (1587-1619) who had recently nursed him through a dangerous sickness. In 1622 Digges published a translation of a Spanish novel by G. de Cespedes y Meneses entitled Gerardo the Unfortunate Spaniard published by Blount which he dedicated to William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke Grand Master Of England and Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’ to whom Bacon dedicated the First Folio.

Leonard Digges, trans., The Rape Of Proserpine. Translated out of Clavdian in Latine, into English Verse: by Leonard Digges, Gent (London: printed by George Purslowe for Edward Blount, 1617), ‘To His Mvch Honovred Vertvovs Sister, the Lady Palmer, wife to Sir Anthony Palmer, Knight of the Bath: Her Brother L. D. wisheth increase of all Felicitie, &c.’, A2r-v; James Anderson, The New Book Of Constitutions Of The Antient and Honourable Fraternity Of Free and Accepted Masons (London: printed by Caesar Ward and Richard Chandler, 1738), p. 99

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 18.png

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Digges' Dedication to the Herberts

In his dedication ‘To The Right Honorable, In Name And Noblenesse Brothers, William Earle of Pembrooke, Lord High Chamberlaine of his Maiesties Houshold, And Philip, Earle of Montgomerie, Baron of Shurland, Knights of the most Honorable Order of the Garter’ he says ‘Now, that I presume to offer my weake endeuours to the view and protection of both your Lordships, I shall no way despaire of a pardon; since the world, that takes notice of your Noble Goodnesse, (the first, best of your honour’d Titles) giues me assurance, that (though a stranger, rather then an intruder) I shall be esteemed To your Honors both, a deuoted Seruant, LEONARD DIGGES.’ The Earl of Pembroke Grand Master of England would have readily understood the enigmatic ‘though a stranger, rather then an intruder’. In Freemasonry a stranger is a person not known to be a Freemason to those outside the Brotherhood and a Cowan or Intruder is a not a Freemason and hence unwelcome in a Freemason’s Lodge.

Leonard Digges, trans., Gerardo The Vnfortvnate Spaniard. Or A Patterne For Lasciviovs Lovers. Containing seuerall strange miseries of loose Affection. Written by an ingenious Spanish Gentleman, Don Goncalo de Cespedes, and Meneces, in the time of his fiue yeares Imprisonment. Originally in Spanish, and made English by L. D. (London: printed for Edward Blount, 1622), A2r-v

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 19.png

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The fact at it was a headpiece in an early Hebrew Grammar is consistent with the subject matter. The squirrel and the rabbit are the creatures one can imagine to be in the garden which Jacob dreams of in Genesis 37. This is the famous passage about binding the sheath of grain and watching one go upright over the others (having Israel rise over all nations). The AA are in reference to a twofold lineage from Adam to Abraham (Jacob's lineage) characterized by a restorative act of judgement. The light A and the dark A are in likely in reference to life and death, as the sheath grain/wheat is the symbol of the immortality for Christ's believers in the resurrection. The A is stylized to look like a ladder is some of these. It is also for the good and the "not so good" that Jacob represents as opposed to his brothers (good nations vs, bad nations). Jacob is the symbol for Israel. He is loved by the father. Some have suggested that the alphabet reference might imply Alpha and Omega with the A being the first and the last letter (A to A). I would argue that the context does not warrant that.

The emphasis of on the tribes of Israel does actually start to appear in England with Henry the VIII when there is a suggestion that the English are one of the 12 tribes. Assuming for a minute that Bacon saw this and took inspiration from it, what is he seeing here that is of value to him? Is it the idea of Jewish lineages? Of being a believer in Christ and the resurrection of the good? What stops anyone else from liking the subject matter and adapting it, or using what is available? Does any of this have anything to do with the work of repairing the damage done towards the Jewish people in England since 1280? If Israel is beloved by God and the Jews are banished from England is that good omen for the English?

One of the things that is detectable in Shakespeare is the plea to reintegrate the Jew. This idea had supporters and was picking up steam. So much so that it was one of the things that was achieved about the same time that the Royal Society came to be. Part of the enlightenment of the Protestant West and the Royalist faction is this achievement. 

spacer.png

I'm all for attempting to interpret images. I'm not for attempting to make them say something we have in mind when other explanations exist. That is the nature of my criticism. The AA is not strictly proof of Bacon-Rosicrucian involvement. It may or may not signal involvement in a shared belief with roots we can only speculate about. Do you see what I mean?  Even if Bacon liked it and used it it does not stop anyone from having liked it as a choice for a headpiece. Were these the property of a writer or were they available to anyone who used a publisher who had access to it? I would assume that anyone could have chosen from what was available without even knowing of anyone's particular liking for it. I simply don't see how one can ever prove what is alleged to be the proof of a link.

Keep in mind that bad logic is used by some to suggest that Bacon IS many writers he clearly isn't. You can see how quickly off track the whole thing can get when we assume things that do not prove are proving. prove. And Bacon is Andrea to some...because that would surely make him the creator of the Rosicrucian stories and it would be a quick link to the Christian Kabbalists. There are shortcuts that people want to take to push a preferred narrative. It' s not hard to detect this sort of delusion when it goes many instances deep. Taken one by one, as in this case, there is sometimes an air of possibility to the suggestions. There is never a bad time to be critical. Keeping an open mind implies you are critical and sill open to looking at things. It never means that you must accept all that is suggested. One can be critical, open and not in agreement.  In fact, there are so many ideas floating out there which are contradictory that one should expect to find disagreement. If we knew what is alleged to be known we'd have no mystery. Those who think there is not a mystery because they have it all figured out are typically not looking for proof. The are lookin for possibilities to somehow work additively to strengthen their cases. 

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52 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Digges Early Life

For someone so inextricably linked to Shakespeare or to be more precise the First Folio and the important 1640 edition of the Shakespeare Poems there is to the present day (as we have seen) very little known about Leonard Digges. His brief entry in the Dictionary of National Biography amounts to a single paragraph and its revised version in the ODNB (2004-23) to less than a single page. As with his brother we have no information of his early life or education. At the age of fifteen he went to University College, Oxford in 1603 and graduated with Bachelor of Arts in October 1606. Having left Oxford he shortly after travelled abroad for a period of study in foreign universities which may have included some secret courier work on behalf of Bacon carrying information and intelligence as well as manuscripts and books to printers and publishers, and members of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

  

FF8 16.png

 

Leonard is remembered in a publication of works by "Kentish Poets" written in 1821 by Rowland Freeman and features Leonard's translation of the Spanish novel, entitled ‘Gerardo, the Unfortunate Spaniard,’ by G. de Cespedes y Meneses, and dedicated it to the brothers William, earl of Pembroke, and Philip, earl of Montgomery.

It demonstrates Leonard's skill with the English language and in conveying the original authors intent from Spanish and with a little humour as well. In the dedication to the Noble gentlemen he narrates thus:

"Translations, as says a witty Spaniard, are, in respect to their originals, like the knotty wrong-sides of arras-hangings, but by the wit's leave; as the fair outside could ill be seen, without the help of knots within; no more can the fame of a well deserving author be far spread, without the labour of translation".

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Diggs-58#_ref-9

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Digges Early Life

For someone so inextricably linked to Shakespeare or to be more precise the First Folio and the important 1640 edition of the Shakespeare Poems there is to the present day (as we have seen) very little known about Leonard Digges. His brief entry in the Dictionary of National Biography amounts to a single paragraph and its revised version in the ODNB (2004-23) to less than a single page. As with his brother we have no information of his early life or education. At the age of fifteen he went to University College, Oxford in 1603 and graduated with Bachelor of Arts in October 1606. Having left Oxford he shortly after travelled abroad for a period of study in foreign universities which may have included some secret courier work on behalf of Bacon carrying information and intelligence as well as manuscripts and books to printers and publishers, and members of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

  

FF8 16.png

https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/shakespeares-collected-poems-1640

Thank you A Phoenix !

I had never read the poem by Leonard Digges "Vpon Master William Shakespeare, the Deceased Authour and his poems".

Here is something very interesting that I noticed on the first page by counting from "Poets".

(By the way "Poets are born not made" echoes Ben Jonson's Eulogy, "For a good Poe's made, as well as borne" on line 26 (B.F) 😉 )

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/10/index.html%3Fzoom=1200.html

image.png.2ec59fa931fed84343038d7c1c681bd1.png

https://shakespearedocumented.folger.edu/resource/document/sonnets-second-edition

018594.jpg?itok=sESnjjFq

Source : Folger Shakespeare Library

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/

The first "he" in "he was a Poet" is the 33rd word : 33 = BACON

By counting "Plagiari-like" as one ...

The fourth "he" is the 119th word, and for me 119 is the simple cipher of MEDIOCRIA FIRMA, the motto of Bacon's Family.

(This is also the simple cipher of ALL IS NUMBER 😉 )

"his" and "Workes" are the 59th and 60th words from "Poets"  ,  59+60 = 119 = MEDIOCRIA FIRMA

The fifth and last "he" in "all that he doth write" is the 133rd word. 🙂  

And I wonder if the 33 letters of the 33rd line could conceal BACON ...

"On Gods name may the Bull or Cockpit have"

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3 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

The fact at it was a headpiece in an early Hebrew Grammar is consistent with the subject matter. The squirrel and the rabbit are the creatures one can imagine to be in the garden which Jacob dreams of in Genesis 37. This is the famous passage about binding the sheath of grain and watching one go upright over the others (having Israel rise over all nations). The AA are in reference to a twofold lineage from Adam to Abraham (Jacob's lineage) characterized by a restorative act of judgement. The light A and the dark A are in likely in reference to life and death, as the sheath grain/wheat is the symbol of the immortality for Christ's believers in the resurrection. The A is stylized to look like a ladder is some of these. It is also for the good and the "not so good" that Jacob represents as opposed to his brothers (good nations vs, bad nations). Jacob is the symbol for Israel. He is loved by the father. Some have suggested that the alphabet reference might imply Alpha and Omega with the A being the first and the last letter (A to A). I would argue that the context does not warrant that.

The emphasis of on the tribes of Israel does actually start to appear in England with Henry the VIII when there is a suggestion that the English are one of the 12 tribes. Assuming for a minute that Bacon saw this and took inspiration from it, what is he seeing here that is of value to him? Is it the idea of Jewish lineages? Of being a believer in Christ and the resurrection of the good? What stops anyone else from liking the subject matter and adapting it, or using what is available? Does any of this have anything to do with the work of repairing the damage done towards the Jewish people in England since 1280? If Israel is beloved by God and the Jews are banished from England is that good omen for the English?

One of the things that is detectable in Shakespeare is the plea to reintegrate the Jew. This idea had supporters and was picking up steam. So much so that it was one of the things that was achieved about the same time that the Royal Society came to be. Part of the enlightenment of the Protestant West and the Royalist faction is this achievement. 

spacer.png

I'm all for attempting to interpret images. I'm not for attempting to make them say something we have in mind when other explanations exist. That is the nature of my criticism. The AA is not strictly proof of Bacon-Rosicrucian involvement. It may or may not signal involvement in a shared belief with roots we can only speculate about. Do you see what I mean?  Even if Bacon liked it and used it it does not stop anyone from having liked it as a choice for a headpiece. Were these the property of a writer or were they available to anyone who used a publisher who had access to it? I would assume that anyone could have chosen from what was available without even knowing of anyone's particular liking for it. I simply don't see how one can ever prove what is alleged to be the proof of a link.

Keep in mind that bad logic is used by some to suggest that Bacon IS many writers he clearly isn't. You can see how quickly off track the whole thing can get when we assume things that do not prove are proving. prove. And Bacon is Andrea to some...because that would surely make him the creator of the Rosicrucian stories and it would be a quick link to the Christian Kabbalists. There are shortcuts that people want to take to push a preferred narrative. It' s not hard to detect this sort of delusion when it goes many instances deep. Taken one by one, as in this case, there is sometimes an air of possibility to the suggestions. There is never a bad time to be critical. Keeping an open mind implies you are critical and sill open to looking at things. It never means that you must accept all that is suggested. One can be critical, open and not in agreement.  In fact, there are so many ideas floating out there which are contradictory that one should expect to find disagreement. If we knew what is alleged to be known we'd have no mystery. Those who think there is not a mystery because they have it all figured out are typically not looking for proof. The are lookin for possibilities to somehow work additively to strengthen their cases. 

Hi CJ,

Your interpretation of the AA, the squirrel and the rabbit, is interesting but it does pesuppose that the first AA emblem appeared for the first time in the Book that I mentionned, "Chronographia" published in 1567. I did not find it yet in an older book, but I found it in another book printed by Martinum Juvenem that is not about "Hebrew Grammar" so I keep open to another meaning. Personally, I am interested in "the migration of woodblocks".

Martinum Juvenem printed a second book in 1576.

https://books.google.fr/books?id=fwwqrm9v3JAC&pg=PP5&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

In this Book, we do not have the AA Emblem, but we can find the "Green Man" on page 121 and 157, the Green Man that we will find many years later on the Title pages of some Shakespeare's Quartos and which seems to appears for the first time in England in the following Book:

"Ekatompathia" (The Hundred ways) by Watson published in 1582.

It seems to be the first English Book in which we can find the "Grail" AA Emblem.

(Two years before The Essayes of a Prentise in the Divine Art of Poesie".)

IMG_20230902_133758.jpg.4b2bb986e0920015ea2ad8a63f271cda.jpg

My idea is that if this is the same woodblock that was used in 1576 in "Hebraicum Alphabethum"  and in 1579 in "De Rep. Anglorum Instaurada" we should not find a Book published in Paris in 1579 with the "AA Emblem" because the woodblock was in London.

I did not find a book printed by Martinum Juvenem in 1579 with the AA emblem, but I found one book with it published the following year (1580) :

https://books.google.fr/books?id=n_t6zMAGccoC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

If the woodblock was in London in 1579, it would mean that it came back to Paris in 1580.

Interestingly enough, Anthony Bacon travelled to France in 1580.

What if the woodblocks of the AA Emblem and of the Green Man travelled to London in 1579 with Francis Bacon in order to be "copied" with some modifications (The "Grail" AA emblem and the "Green man" slightly different which appear in Ekatompathia) and they travelled back to France in 1580 with his Brother Anthony Bacon ?

This is just an idea /suggestion.

The book published in 1580 is about Adrien Turnebe.

https://printinginfrance.edwardworthlibrary.ie/second-generation/adrien-turnebe/

Notice that the previous edition of this book was published in 1577 without the AA emblem but with a "A" emblem  instead,that is the same that Turnebe used as a printer.

The AA emblem does not appear in this Book printed in 1581 by Martinum Juvenem :

https://books.google.fr/books?id=9gSMUVJkpocC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

But it appears in 1582 in a Book which is ,again,  about Hebrew grammar :

https://books.google.fr/books?id=9jkPm7okO7IC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

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13 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi CJ,

Your interpretation of the AA, the squirrel and the rabbit, is interesting but it does pesuppose that the first AA emblem appeared for the first time in the Book that I mentionned, "Chronographia" published in 1567. I did not find it yet in an older book, but I found it in another book printed by Martinum Juvenem that is not about "Hebrew Grammar" so I keep open to another meaning. Personally, I am interested in "the migration of woodblocks".

Martinum Juvenem printed a second book in 1576.

https://books.google.fr/books?id=fwwqrm9v3JAC&pg=PP5&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

In this Book, we do not have the AA Emblem, but we can find the "Green Man" on page 121 and 157, the Green Man that we will find many years later on the Title pages of some Shakespeare's Quartos and which seems to appears for the first time in England in the following Book:

"Ekatompathia" (The Hundred ways) by Watson published in 1582.

It seems to be the first English Book in which we can find the "Grail" AA Emblem.

(Two years before The Essayes of a Prentise in the Divine Art of Poesie".)

IMG_20230902_133758.jpg.4b2bb986e0920015ea2ad8a63f271cda.jpg

My idea is that if this is the same woodblock that was used in 1576 in "Hebraicum Alphabethum"  and in 1579 in "De Rep. Anglorum Instaurada" we should not find a Book published in Paris in 1579 with the "AA Emblem" because the woodblock was in London.

I did not find a book printed by Martinum Juvenem in 1579 with the AA emblem, but I found one book with it published the following year (1580) :

https://books.google.fr/books?id=n_t6zMAGccoC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

If the woodblock was in London in 1579, it would mean that it came back to Paris in 1580.

Interestingly enough, Anthony Bacon travelled to France in 1580.

What if the woodblocks of the AA Emblem and of the Green Man travelled to London in 1579 with Francis Bacon in order to be "copied" with some modifications (The "Grail" AA emblem and the "Green man" slightly different which appear in Ekatompathia) and they travelled back to France in 1580 with his Brother Anthony Bacon ?

This is just an idea /suggestion.

The book published in 1580 is about Adrien Turnebe.

https://printinginfrance.edwardworthlibrary.ie/second-generation/adrien-turnebe/

Notice that the previous edition of this book was published in 1577 without the AA emblem but with a "A" emblem  instead,that is the same that Turnebe used as a printer.

The AA emblem does not appear in this Book printed in 1581 by Martinum Juvenem :

https://books.google.fr/books?id=9gSMUVJkpocC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

But it appears in 1582 in a Book which is ,again,  about Hebrew grammar :

https://books.google.fr/books?id=9jkPm7okO7IC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

More than one similar looking block may have existed and been possessed by various printers who were associates (among the ones who specialized in printing esoteric works, i.e.), especially if the subject matter was appreciated and useful to convey a core belief. One would have to be able to precisely show that they are identical and then move to trace one block (an almost impossible task). They may all have common origin in some Jewish/esoteric center of Europe.

What you call the Grail type is definitely an adaptation. The sheaf of grain is a vase in that one. I can see now why you took notice of the Urn-type handles in the Sylva Sylavrum cartouche when I mentioned them. On that page if we take the vase to be associated to that then the idea of a composition which is exploiting the vase of life above it is a very strong similarity indeed. The vase of life is almost synonymous with the tree of life which grows in the garden. This is the garden that Hercules and his story involving the Pillars is touching on in the Greek version. In the tree of life grows the golden apple, which is of course the knowledge of what is in the unattainable vault (that's another of the earlier themed images which employs the AA which is a reference to the Enochian vault which is also in Freemasonry). This may be a suggestion of the knowledge of good and evil if we want to involve the white/dark duality. The two pillars is also an idea of the twin pillars of the Jewish line, Adam and Abraham. Adam represents earth and Earth is shown placed in between the pillars in SS. Abraham's meaning is "father of the multitude. The meaning of Sylva Sylavrum title is of "the tree among the multitude of trees".  If the tree is the symbol or placeholder of the knowledge then the Tree of life represents the most exalted knowledge. This is actually an interpretation that one finds for this title page. Bacon, who has suggested he is going further than the ancient pillars of philosophy in another work on the attaining of knowledge is still being placed in the "mundus intellectualis" that receives its light from God above. It is not clear to me if this was Bacon's title choice or Rawley's, but it hardly matters as the idea we are dancing around is traceable. Bacon was clearly trying to get to a method of knowledge in the empirical sense. In the spiritual sense it may be that Rawley is making sure that Bacon's readers understand that there is nothing more basic than the knowledge of God and that this is informing the philosophers. It may work to suggest good and bad philosophical ideas. Rawley wasn't an empiricist. He was quite well placed in the religious hierarchy of England. It is known he did not appreciate all of Bacon's criticisms of religion in Novum Organum where the ship between the pillars is encountered.

You'll notice that all this is consistent with Bacon's work on advancing knowledge. We can imagine why he might have gravitated to this headpiece's subject matter.

On account of your interest in woodblocks, you may be interested to know that I have prepared a winter project where I am going to try to produce a large woodblock of the Droeshout portrait. I'm going to use the composition I have worked out to help in the task of placing the features. I may make a series of posts to follow the journey. 

 

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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On a Double A side note, I've always wondered if the two A's could be the A's in the first row of the table I am sharing that are at 157 and 287. And if so, then the Double A's and the Secret Shakespearean Seal numbers 157 and 287 are related. Certainly what CJ says about the double A's as Adam and Abraham could be connected as well, and further indeed the Two Pillars.

Of course as far as we know, before 9-11-2001 the table I point to below may not have existed. I believe it did, but you know how beliefs can be. 😉

image.png.b3276a952d3a50ac2dacce43eb043a38.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Why is the top of the pyramid missing in this 1563 woodcut?

https://archive.org/details/bub_gb_sc-Zaq8_jFIC/page/n165/mode/1up

image.png.0e61dcf8b2eb09a722a680fedec8c933.png

Mather Walker, page 16:

https://sirbacon.org/archives/PLUS ULTRA - w4 w ToC.pdf

The light A, dark A device appeared on a book dated 1563. The book was “De Furtivis Literarum Notis Vulgo. De Ziferia,” Ioan. Baptista Porta Neapolitano Authore. Cum Privilegio Neapoli, apud Ioa. Mariam Scotum. MDLXIII. However, William Smedley demonstrated that this was a post-dated book. In his book, “The
Mystery of Francis Bacon”, William Smedley said:

“The first edition of this work was published in Naples in 1563 by Joa. Marius Scotus, but this does not contain the AA design. In 1592 the book was published in London by John Wolfe; this reprint was dedicated to Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland. After the edition has been printed the title-page was altered to
correspond with the 1563 Naples publication. The dedication was taken out, and a reprint of the original dedication was substituted, and over this was placed the AA head piece; then an edition was struck off, and until to-day, it has been sold and re-sold as the first edition of Baptista Porta’s work.”

Smedley said it is difficult to offer any explanation as to why this fraud was committed. However it is obvious this was done to conceal the evidence that the 1577 Alciat edition was the first appearance of the AA device.

No matter what, and I can't read anything in this book, it has some good visuals.

image.png.8eb7b0c7f2ad8a706c982895b9636917.png

image.png.1aa86b7f215ee2522dddb0ceca72f555.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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I'm sorry if I am being a Hog tonight, but I have been starving for Bacon with work taking my time and a scary Hurricane passing by.

See the circle divided into 28 pieces which is kind of simple math where everything adds up to 364 just like the Sonnets.

13 x 28 = 364

26 x 14 = 364 (Sonnets Pyramid design)

52 x 7 = 364

image.png.3d81a0c1f0ec15ce65edcbfa84e49f5c.png

Using the 21 letter alphabet in the design, where Day 157 should be is the letter "O" (XIII). Where Day 287 should be is the first blank spot after the "Z" (XXII). 

Obviously "P", or 14 (XIII) ends the first half where Day 182 would end and Day 183 begins. See the patterns? Exactly the same as the Sonnets Pyramid design / 2.

28 instead of 14 but its an easy math. Whether 28 x 13, 13 x 28, 52 x 7, or 7 x 52, the Pyramid Design with 26 x 14 or 14 x 26 is the same. Here it is shown in 1563 in a book that was at least rumored to have the Double A's.

I just shared this table earlier today and it so fits like a cheveril glove right now except 157 above is the letter "O" and 287 is immediately beyond the "Z" at 22 (XXII). Do you see how it vibrates with the same frequency in perfect divisions??

image.png.77d74017eeb9b652bbb56998d6a3b3aa.png

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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The Herbert Dedication

The following year Bacon dedicated the Shakespeare First Folio believed by some to be the greatest Freemasonic book in the history of the world ‘To The Most Noble And Incomparable Paire Of Brethren. William Earle of Pembroke,&c., Lord Chamberlaine to the Kings most Excellent Maiesty. And Philp, Earle of Montgomery, &c. Gentleman of his Maiesties Bed-Chamber. Both Knights of the most Noble Order of the Garter, and our singular good Lords.’

Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies. Published according to the True Orginall Copies (London: printed by Isaac Jaggard and Edward Blount, 1623), ‘To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare’, A2r

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 20.png

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