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To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon


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To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

 

In his poem prefixed to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio, Leonard Digges made the first known printed reference to the Stratford Shakespeare monument wherein he enigmatically states that ‘Time dissolues thy Stratford Moniment’, meaning, as we shall see, that the fullness of time will reveal the secret hidden truth concealed behind the façade of this Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic monument and reveal the true author of the Shakespeare works.

It is truly remarkable how little is known about Leonard Digges the contributor of a verse to the most famous secular publication in all English and world literature.

The Digges and Bacon families had a long and close relationship that went back generations and Francis Bacon and Leonard Digges were related through marriage. Their concealed and obscured relationship has been systematically supressed from the pages of history for the last four hundred years here revealed for the first time.

Hundreds of thousands of scholars, students and tourists travel from all around the globe to visit Stratford-Upon-Avon and the Shakespeare monument to pay homage to the greatest poet and dramatist in the history of the world but are not able to see and comprehend what is hidden in plain sight in front of their own eyes. The full Rosicrucian-Freemasonic significance of the Shakespeare monument has been enveloped in silence for the last four centuries, until now.

The Shakespeare monument is a Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic cryptogram revealing the secret author of the Shakespeare poems and plays. It is as Peter Dawkins points out a critical gateway into the heart of the mystery of Shakespeare which when fully revealed has very far-reaching consequences that will ultimately demand the re-writing of history and change forever the face of Baconian-Shakespearean scholarship.

One of the early printed references to the monument at Stratford-upon-Avon appeared in the first edition of the aptly titled A Banqvet Of Ieasts Neuer before Imprinted (1630). The only two known copies of this extremely rare 1630 edition are held at the Bodleian Library. No name of an author appears on its title page. This little known work hidden from the world by Stratfordian authorities contains a very carefully constructed cryptogram that conveys the secret that the Stratford Monument placed there by Bacon and his Rosicrucian Brotherhood presenting William Shakspere of Stratford as the author of the Shakespeare works is a merry jest, a Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion, all hidden in plain sight.

In his poem prefixed to the Shakespeare First Folio his inward friend and Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brother Leonard Digges cryptically reveals that he is privy to the hidden truth which some day in the future will finally be revealed to the world. The same is hinted at around the emblem of Father Time on the title page of Bacon’s New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians) ‘IN TIME THE HIDDEN TRUTH WILL BE REVEALED’, namely, that Francis Bacon is the secret author of the Shakespeare works.

 

PAPER: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

YT F8 TRAILER COVER.png

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Thank you, A. Phoenix! I've never looked closely at this dedication before. Thanks for putting the Light on this treasure! 🙂

What a playground to explore!

Be sure, our Shake-speare, thou canst neuer dye,
But crown'd with Lawrell, liue eternally.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/13/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.503c34cf4c79c2cdfb3ced8e10f624e3.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Based on lessons I think I have learned from studying Bacon's works with certain numbers showing up, 157 is one that is used for strength, permanence, and eternal purposes. This dedication is a great example where the meaning matches a 157 signature. Look, there are 157 words between the first Shake-speare and the last Shake-speare when skipping the three words in parenthesis.

(Sorry if you share this later, A. Phoenix, I just started poking around and saw this.)

image.png.d4d8427697d11e462cde4ba5da7144b9.png

So we have the required 157, so there must be a 287.

I have been looking, and my breath taken by this which I cannot validate yet suggests that Line 287 of some kind of count is:

But crown'd with Lawrell, liue eternally.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/Pref_F1/page/15/index.html

image.png.9db26fa2111456c1943074e49b7d9524.png

L. Digges may have been trained on the use of the two important Seal numbers, 157 and 287. 😉

Let's highlight the letters for BACON and WILL TUDOR if we are allowed to share the letter O on line 287 of text in the First Folio:

BUT CROWN'D WITH LAWRELL

That leaves:

WTHWREL

WTHWREL is 102 Simple cipher. And you know that:

ONE HUNDRED TWO adds up to 157 Simple and 287 Kaye cipher. and can be both Seal numbers by itself. 

Line 287 has BACON and WILL TUDOR contained in the phrase, "But crown'd with Lawrell" leaving letters that add up to 102. And the ONE HUNDRED TWO shares the same Simple and Kaye ciphers as WILLIAM TUDOR I and of course FRA ROSI CROSSE. Don't forget the 157 words between the first Shake-speare and the last Shake-speare in this amazing dedication.

Thy Tombe, thy name must:

33 words in italic between the colon after "must" and the colon after "Ages" skipping the regular type Stratford.

image.png.154ead5b6ade1977976cfbca388645f2.png

I must end tonight with this thought and take it to sleep with me as we alive shall view thee still:

Thy Tombe, thy name must: when that stone is rent,
And Time dissolues thy Stratford Moniment,
Here we aliue shall view thee still.

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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14 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

 

In his poem prefixed to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio, Leonard Digges made the first known printed reference to the Stratford Shakespeare monument wherein he enigmatically states that ‘Time dissolues thy Stratford Moniment’, meaning, as we shall see, that the fullness of time will reveal the secret hidden truth concealed behind the façade of this Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic monument and reveal the true author of the Shakespeare works.

It is truly remarkable how little is known about Leonard Digges the contributor of a verse to the most famous secular publication in all English and world literature.

The Digges and Bacon families had a long and close relationship that went back generations and Francis Bacon and Leonard Digges were related through marriage. Their concealed and obscured relationship has been systematically supressed from the pages of history for the last four hundred years here revealed for the first time.

Hundreds of thousands of scholars, students and tourists travel from all around the globe to visit Stratford-Upon-Avon and the Shakespeare monument to pay homage to the greatest poet and dramatist in the history of the world but are not able to see and comprehend what is hidden in plain sight in front of their own eyes. The full Rosicrucian-Freemasonic significance of the Shakespeare monument has been enveloped in silence for the last four centuries, until now.

The Shakespeare monument is a Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic cryptogram revealing the secret author of the Shakespeare poems and plays. It is as Peter Dawkins points out a critical gateway into the heart of the mystery of Shakespeare which when fully revealed has very far-reaching consequences that will ultimately demand the re-writing of history and change forever the face of Baconian-Shakespearean scholarship.

One of the early printed references to the monument at Stratford-upon-Avon appeared in the first edition of the aptly titled A Banqvet Of Ieasts Neuer before Imprinted (1630). The only two known copies of this extremely rare 1630 edition are held at the Bodleian Library. No name of an author appears on its title page. This little known work hidden from the world by Stratfordian authorities contains a very carefully constructed cryptogram that conveys the secret that the Stratford Monument placed there by Bacon and his Rosicrucian Brotherhood presenting William Shakspere of Stratford as the author of the Shakespeare works is a merry jest, a Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion, all hidden in plain sight.

In his poem prefixed to the Shakespeare First Folio his inward friend and Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brother Leonard Digges cryptically reveals that he is privy to the hidden truth which some day in the future will finally be revealed to the world. The same is hinted at around the emblem of Father Time on the title page of Bacon’s New Atlantis (Land of the Rosicrucians) ‘IN TIME THE HIDDEN TRUTH WILL BE REVEALED’, namely, that Francis Bacon is the secret author of the Shakespeare works.

 

PAPER: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

YT F8 TRAILER COVER.png

Leonard Digges 1588 – 1635, not to be confused with his grandfather, scientist and geometer, Leonard Digges 1515 - 1559. No luck in finding any portraits of either.

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To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges & the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument

commissioned by Francis Bacon

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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‘At first it seems impossible that such a such a thing should ever be discovered; once it has been discovered, the wonder is that it                                     remained undiscovered so long.’

Francis Bacon, The Refutation of Philosophies; Benjamin Farrington, The Philosophy of Francis Bacon (Liverpool University Press, 1964), p. 120

In his poem prefixed to the Shakespeare First Folio Bacon’s inward friend and Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brother Leonard Digges made the first known printed reference to the Stratford Shakespeare monument wherein he tells us that when ‘Time dissolues  thy Stratford Moniment’ the hidden truth will finally be revealed to the world.

The Digges family were eminent mathematicians, scientists and astronomers and as we shall see the Digges and Bacon families had a long and close relationship that went back generations, and they were in fact kinsmen.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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Leonard Digges

It is truly remarkable how little is known about Leonard Digges a contributor of a verse to the most famous secular publication in English and world literature. Until recently the entry for Digges in the Dictionary of National Biography by the Shakespeare authority Sir Sidney Lee published in 1888 was the primary source for the known biographical details about his hidden and obscured life which is quoted here in full:

'Digges, Leonard (1588-1635), poet and translator, son of Thomas Digges, by Agnes, daughter of Sir Warham St. Leger, was born in London in 1588, and went to University College, Oxford, in 1603, aged fifteen. He proceeded B.A. 31 Oct. 1606, and travelled abroad, studying at many foreign universities. In consideration of his continental studies, he was created M.A. at Oxford on 20 Nov. 1626, and allowed to reside at University College. He died there 7 April 1635.'

           Sidney Lee, Leonard Digges (1588-1635), Dictionary of National Biography
 

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 3.png

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The Digges Brief Biography

This suspiciously brief biographical account of Leonard Digges served as the first go to for scholars and students until 2004 when it was succeeded by the brief entry for him in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23) by ‘Sidney Lee, revised by Elizabeth Haresnape’. The updated entry for Digges which had benefited from more than a century of modern scholarship repeated as indicated by its accreditation much of the earlier entry in the DNB and added a few more minor biographical details which will be given notice in its appropriate place.

Neither the entry for Leonard Digges in the DNB or the ODNB refer to or once mention Bacon and likewise for the last four hundred years none of the orthodox Bacon editors and biographers mention Leonard Digges even though Spedding brings up his brother Sir Dudley Digges (1582/3-1639) on a number of occasions in volumes IV, V, and VII of his standard Letters and Life of Francis Bacon and professors Jardine and Stewart in Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (1998) refer to his father Thomas Digges (c. 1546-95) and his grandfather Leonard Digges (c.1515-c.1559) and his brother Sir Dudley Digges (1582/3-1639), but for some reason best known to themselves, Spedding and Jardine and Stewart do not include any notice whatsoever of the poet Leonard Digges, contributor of  a verse to the First Folio.

Sidney Lee, rev. by Elizabeth Haresnape, Leonard Digges (1588-1635), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23); Spedding, Letters and Life, IV, pp. 230, 370; V, pp. 50, 66; VII, pp. 188, 191, 194; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart in Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), pp. 24, 98, 345, 350

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 4.png

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6 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The Digges Brief Biography

This suspiciously brief biographical account of Leonard Digges served as the first go to for scholars and students until 2004 when it was succeeded by the brief entry for him in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23) by ‘Sidney Lee, revised by Elizabeth Haresnape’. The updated entry for Digges which had benefited from more than a century of modern scholarship repeated as indicated by its accreditation much of the earlier entry in the DNB and added a few more minor biographical details which will be given notice in its appropriate place.

Neither the entry for Leonard Digges in the DNB or the ODNB refer to or once mention Bacon and likewise for the last four hundred years none of the orthodox Bacon editors and biographers mention Leonard Digges even though Spedding brings up his brother Sir Dudley Digges (1582/3-1639) on a number of occasions in volumes IV, V, and VII of his standard Letters and Life of Francis Bacon and professors Jardine and Stewart in Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (1998) refer to his father Thomas Digges (c. 1546-95) and his grandfather Leonard Digges (c.1515-c.1559) and his brother Sir Dudley Digges (1582/3-1639), but for some reason best known to themselves, Spedding and Jardine and Stewart do not include any notice whatsoever of the poet Leonard Digges, contributor of  a verse to the First Folio.

Sidney Lee, rev. by Elizabeth Haresnape, Leonard Digges (1588-1635), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23); Spedding, Letters and Life, IV, pp. 230, 370; V, pp. 50, 66; VII, pp. 188, 191, 194; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart in Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), pp. 24, 98, 345, 350

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 4.png

Leonard Digges (1588–1635)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Digges_(writer)

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Diggs-58

https://shakespearedocumented.folger.edu/resource/document/rimas-de-lope-de-vega-carpio-leonard-digges-praises-shakespeares-sonnets

Burial site: https://talbot.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/search/catalog/schaaf-1891

 

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The Bacons & The Digges Families

The obscured and virtually unknown relationship between the Bacons and Digges went back to the middle of the sixteenth century which continued through to the middle of the seventeenth century with the important poem by Leonard Digges prefixed to the edition of the Shakespeare Poems in 1640. His grandfather Leonard Digges (c.1515-c.1559) after whom he was named was one of the first generation of English mathematical authors to issue works in the vernacular, however only two of his works were published in his lifetime. According to Fuller he ‘was the best architect in that age for all manner of buildings, for conveniency, pleasure, state, strength, being excellent at fortifications’, these and other interests he shared with his special patron Nicholas Bacon.

Thomas Fuller, The History of The Worthies Of England, ed., P Austin Nuttall (New York: AMS Press Inc, 1965), II, p. 152; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 58-9, 67-8; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon (1510-1579), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23)

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 5.png

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Patron Nicholas Bacon

His ground-breaking work entitled A Geometrical Practise, named Pantometria was published posthumously by his son Thomas Digges in 1571. He dedicated the work to Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon, in the fulfilment of the wishes of his father, who had discussed mathematics and the sciences with Bacon who had served as a very special patron to his father, and patron and protector to himself. Opposite the first page of the dedication to Sir Nicholas Bacon is a full-page reproduction of the Bacon family coat of arms with its Latin motto Mediocria Firma (Moderation is Strength) topped with the crest of a boar a coat of arms inherited by his son Francis Bacon which appears in various editions of his works.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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Dr John Dee

Following the death of his father, from the age of thirteen Thomas Digges’s upbringing and education fell to his father’s close friend Dr John Dee. Thomas would later refer to his master and mentor Dr Dee as his ‘second mathematical father’, and in turn Dee considered Digges as ‘my most worthy mathematical heir’. Through the next two decades Dee and Digges benefitted from the patronage of Sir Nicholas Bacon and his brother-in-law Sir William Cecil which in the course of time brought them into close contact with the aspiring scientific genius of the family Francis Bacon, who even at a young age was then planning a universal reformation of the whole world.

Thomas Digges, Alae Sev Scalae Mathematicae (London: Thomas Marshe, 1573), A2v; John Dee, Parallacticae commentationis praxeosque nucleus quidam (London: printed by John Day, 1573), A2v

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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5 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The Bacons & The Digges Families

The obscured and virtually unknown relationship between the Bacons and Digges went back to the middle of the sixteenth century which continued through to the middle of the seventeenth century with the important poem by Leonard Digges prefixed to the edition of the Shakespeare Poems in 1640. His grandfather Leonard Digges (c.1515-c.1559) after whom he was named was one of the first generation of English mathematical authors to issue works in the vernacular, however only two of his works were published in his lifetime. According to Fuller he ‘was the best architect in that age for all manner of buildings, for conveniency, pleasure, state, strength, being excellent at fortifications’, these and other interests he shared with his special patron Nicholas Bacon.

Thomas Fuller, The History of The Worthies Of England, ed., P Austin Nuttall (New York: AMS Press Inc, 1965), II, p. 152; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 58-9, 67-8; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon (1510-1579), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23)

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 5.png

Hi A Phoenix

Re: Leonard Digges Snr. 

As you would know, Leonard Digges' appreciation of Sir Nicholas Bacon's patronage of his scientific / mathematical studies is evident in the dedication of Digges' "Pantometria" published in 1571: To the right honorable my singular good Lorde Sir Nicolas Bacon Knight, Lord keper of the great seale of England.

According to Wikipedia and a number of other sites, Leonard Digges died in 1559. If so, his son Thomas who worked closely with his father, must have published "Pantometria" posthumously. Elsewhere on the web, 1571 and 1576 are given as the year of Digges' death. All a bit confusing.

A GEOMETRICAL Practise, named PANTOMETRIA: https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A20458.0001.001?rgn=main;view=fulltext

 

Which brings us back to Leonard Digges. After his death in 1559 he left his son Thomas in the care of John Dee who was to be his tutor. Dee had an extensive collection of lenses and mirrors so if Thomas Digges had ever had the intention to upgrade his father's Perspective Glass with top quality optics he would have had every chance to do so.  There is evidence that Dee looked through the Digges Perspective Glass as he writes in his preface to his translation of Euclid.
"He may wonderfully helpe him selfe, by perspective glasses. In which (I trust) our posterity will prove more skillfull and expert, and to greater purposes, than in these days, can (almost) credite to be possible". 

 Harriot, Digges, Dee and Chekhov!: http://tudortelescope.blogspot.com/2017/12/harriot-digges-dee-and-chekhov.html

 

Guns and Geometry – The Practical Mathematics of Leonard and Thomas Digges

https://worcestercathedrallibrary.wordpress.com/2020/09/24/guns-and-geometry-the-practical-mathematics-of-leonard-and-thomas-digges/

 

Mathematical Treasures - Thomas Digges' Pantometria

https://maa.org/press/periodicals/convergence/mathematical-treasures-thomas-digges-pantometria

 

Thomas Digges remembered Sir Nicholas discussing geometrical principles and their applications with his father, the mathematician Leonard Digges: `Calling to memory the conference it pleased your honour to use with him touching the Sciences Mathematical, especially in Geometrical measurements.'

Hostage to Fortune.pdf

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Very interesting!! 🙂

 

The Earl of Leicester

On his return to England in March 1579 for a time Bacon resided with the Earl of Leicester (his secret biological father) at Leicester House on the Strand which was evidently visited by Thomas Digges during the same period. It was at Leicester House that Bacon and Philip Sidney and other inward friends met for discussions about philosophy, literature and science, whose number most probably included Thomas Digges, now working under the patronage of the Earl of Leicester to whom he dedicated the revised 1579 edition of the military treatise Stratioticos. A dedication curiously sprinkled with some Baconian-like language and phraseology.

Julian Martin, Francis Bacon, the state, and the reform of Natural Philosophy (Cambridge University Press, 1992), pp. 28-35; Leonard Digges, An Arithemitcall Militare Treatise, named Stratioticos (London: printed by Henry Bynneman, 1579), A2r-v

PAPER:

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

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Digges Patron

In 1586 through the direct influence of his patron Leicester, Digges was appointed Muster Master-General of the English forces in the Netherlands and he in turn defended Leicester’s reputation in both A Briefe Report of the Militarie Services done in the Low Countries, by the Erle of Leicester (1587), and after the death of his patron in 1588, A Briefe and true report of the Proceedings of the Earle of Leycester for the reliefe of the Towne of Sluce printed in 1590. For this publication Digges secretly collaborated with Bacon. Printed above the address to the reader stands Bacon’s AA headpiece. Nor was this the last of the military publications that Digges and Bacon secretly collaborated on.

Thomas Digges, A Briefe Report Of The Militarie Services done in the Low Covntries, by the Erle of Leicester (London: printed by Arnold Hatfield, 1587); Thomas Digges, A Briefe and true report of the Proceedings of the Earle of Leycester for the reliefe of the Towne of Sluce (London: printed by T. Orwin, 1590), A2r, p. 20, and p. 13

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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Printer Richard Field

His military concerns largely generated from his practical experience, were reflected in a new, revised and augmented edition of An Arithemitcall Militare Treatise, named Stratioticos with the same dedication to his patron Leicester that contained ‘sundrie other Militarie Discourses of no small importance’. At the top of the first page of ‘An Addition To Stratioticos concerning great Ordinance’ and ‘Another Addition concerning Invasion long since by the Author exhibited in writing to the Patrone of this Stratioticos’ is Bacon’s same AA headpiece printed in A Briefe and true report of the Proceedings of the Earle of Leycester. The 1590 second edition of Stratioticos was printed by Richard Field who not too long after printed Bacon’s two Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594).   

Leonard Digges, An Arithemitcall Militare Treatise, named Stratioticos (London: printed by Richard Field, 1590), pp. 361, 369

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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Source for Othello

The revised and augmented second edition of Stratioticos was followed by a second edition of Pantometria ‘Lately Reviewed By The Author himselfe, and augmented with sundrie additions’, namely military pieces on artillery and ballistics, most probably published after consultation with Bacon that reprints the dedication to his father Sir Nicholas Bacon from the first edition.

Leonard Digges, A Geometrical Practise, named PantometriaLately Reviewed By The Author himselfe, and augmented with sundrie additions (London: printed by Abel Jeffes, 1591), dedication

Several orthodox Shakespeare  scholars have noticed that Digges’ Stratioticos is a source for some of Othello’s military material.

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Source for Othello

The revised and augmented second edition of Stratioticos was followed by a second edition of Pantometria ‘Lately Reviewed By The Author himselfe, and augmented with sundrie additions’, namely military pieces on artillery and ballistics, most probably published after consultation with Bacon that reprints the dedication to his father Sir Nicholas Bacon from the first edition.

Leonard Digges, A Geometrical Practise, named PantometriaLately Reviewed By The Author himselfe, and augmented with sundrie additions (London: printed by Abel Jeffes, 1591), dedication

Several orthodox Shakespeare  scholars have noticed that Digges’ Stratioticos is a source for some of Othello’s military material.

PAPER:

https://www.academia.edu/105955896/To_The_Memorie_of_the_deceased_Authour_Maister_W_Shakespeare_by_Leonard_Digges_and_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Stratford_Monument_commissioned_by_Francis_Bacon

VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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So interesting and helpful. Thanks AP!

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Family Connections

There is another very important piece of information not recorded in the extensive Bacon biographical canon. At some unknown date Digges married Anne, daughter of Sir Warham St Leger and his wife Ursula, daughter of George Neville, Lord Abergavenny. This means Digges and Bacon were related. Sir Henry Neville (d.1593) who was ‘descended of the Nevilles at Abergavenny’ was married to Sir Nicholas Bacon’s eldest daughter Elizabeth, Bacon’s elder sister; and his son and namesake the courtier and diplomat Sir Henry Neville (1561/2-1615) married Anne, daughter of Sir Henry Killigrew and his wife Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew, the younger sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon. During the 1590s Sir Henry Neville the younger moved in the Bacon-Essex circles in and around Essex House on the Strand. His nephew Sir Henry Neville makes an appearance on the outer cover of Bacon’s collection of MSS known as the Northumberland Manuscript which originally held copies of his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

Sidney Lee, Thomas Digges (d. 1595), Dictionary of National Biography states she was the ‘daughter of George Neville, lord Abergavenny’ and Leslie Hotson, I, William Shakespeare Do Appoint Thomas Russell Esquire (London: Jonathan Cape, 1937), p. 126 states Agnes was ‘the granddaughter of George Neville, Lord Abergavenny’; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 152-53; Leslie Hotson, I, William Shakespeare Do Appoint Thomas Russell Esquire (London: Jonathan Cape, 1937), p. 126; M. Greengrass, Sir Henry Neville (1561/2-1615), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-23); Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune: The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), pp. 84, 239 248, 346, 351

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

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Bacon's Nephew Henry Neville

On the top left-hand side of the outer cover containing its contents the name Neville can be seen in two places above the punning motto of the family ‘Ne vile velis’. Perhaps writes its editor ‘this gives a clue to the original ownership of the volume, as it seems to indicate that the collection was written for, or was the property of, some member of the Neville family.’ If the Northumberland MSS was at one time or another in the possession of Bacon’s nephew Sir Henry Neville and other members of the Bacon-Neville family it might conceivably have been seen by Thomas Digges, who may have been in possession of another copy of the same, which also may have housed manuscript copies of Bacon’s Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.  

Frank J. Burgoyne, ed., Collotype Facsimile & Type Transcript Of An Elizabethan Manuscript Preserved Alnwick Castle, Northumberland (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904), pp. xiii-xv

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 13.png

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The Digges Family

The marriage between Thomas Digges and his wife Anne produced four surviving children, two daughters Margaret and Ursula and two sons the politician and diplomat Sir Dudley Digges and his younger brother the poet and translator Leonard Digges.

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VIDEO: To The Memorie of the deceased Authour Maister W. Shakespeare by Leonard Digges

& the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Stratford Monument commissioned by Francis Bacon

https://youtu.be/HggKSZ02NWo

VIDEO 1 MINUTE TRAILER: The Amazing Transformation of the Stratford Shakespeare Monument

https://youtu.be/vJ5u1TZA5-8

FF8 14.png

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