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Hi Kevin,

Please find below the following information from The Rosicrucian Bibliography. The first edition of the Fama Fraternitatis was part of the pamphlet/document titled The Universal Reformation of the Whole World (see number 23 below 147pp.). A second edition appeared in the same year (see number 24 152 pp.)

Hope this is useful for you.

 

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Also, they have a 1614 copy here, so you could send them an email. Seems the info is logged but it’s not digitised yet. They do have later copies digitised.

 

https://embassyofthefreemind.com/en/library/online-catalogue/detail/d53fbc6b-1c42-74d7-fa0d-ff17bf6b759e/media/undefined

Edited by Kate
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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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Thank you to everyone for their help. I have sent a request to the AMOR library, and will share their response.

Mu question stems from Petter Amundsen's documentary, stating Fama Fraternitatis places  amphitheatreactor on page 53, but I didn't think Fama had that many pages.

Regards

 

 

Kevin

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1 hour ago, Kevin box said:

Mu question stems from Petter Amundsen's documentary, stating Fama Fraternitatis places  amphitheatreactor on page 53, but I didn't think Fama had that many pages.

Regards

 

 

Kevin

I wonder if that is a reference to Amphitheatrum sapientiæ æternæ, solius veræ by Heinrich Khunrath.

https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AH6PQ2FLXSD5FI8O/pages

We've had great conversations about it here.

https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AH6PQ2FLXSD5FI8O/full/ARISQ5M25SRLZ58Z

image.png.47a367c4c2fb5f155c3b2ded2c20a24c.png

Amazing video presentation:

 

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38 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I wonder if that is a reference to Amphitheatrum sapientiæ æternæ, solius veræ by Heinrich Khunrath.

https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AH6PQ2FLXSD5FI8O/pages

We've had great conversations about it here.

https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AH6PQ2FLXSD5FI8O/full/ARISQ5M25SRLZ58Z

image.png.47a367c4c2fb5f155c3b2ded2c20a24c.png

Amazing video presentation:

 

Thanks for re-posting, Light-of-Truth. 

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15 hours ago, Kevin box said:

Anyone know how many pages were in the 1614 edition of Fama ?

Thanks 

 

 

Kevin

I noticed the note on Wikipedia that mentions this is not the earliest known edition of the work. One version circulated around 1610. Isn't there assumed to be 111 pages in this work?

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3 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I wonder if that is a reference to Amphitheatrum sapientiæ æternæ, solius veræ by Heinrich Khunrath.

https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AH6PQ2FLXSD5FI8O/pages

We've had great conversations about it here.

https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AH6PQ2FLXSD5FI8O/full/ARISQ5M25SRLZ58Z

image.png.47a367c4c2fb5f155c3b2ded2c20a24c.png

Amazing video presentation:

 

It's an interesting word invention. One could think of it as employing "actor" or "reactor". The actor in the reactor is an alchemical agent, I suppose. 

As for Amundsen's observation, I know he loves going around looking at page 53s for clues associated with the  3:4:5 triangle of corner angle 53 degrees. Why is he stopping on this expression?  I don't think it should surprise anyone that 53 and 111 would be signaled, if indeed they were. Interestingly, the sum of the two can be expressed as a sum of the squares of 10 and 8 (tow sides of a scaled up 3:4:5 with sides 6:8:10). It's one of those numbers that has 3 prime factors (2x2x41) which makes it analogous to the idea of the primacy of a trinity. Amundsen is well of aware of the Pythagorean philosophical links to Rosicrucianism. 

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THE EARLIEST KNOWN PRINTED EDITION OF THE FIRST ROSICRUCIAN MANIFESTO THE FAMA FRATERNITATIS IN 1614

The earliest known printed edition of the first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis appeared at Cassel in Germany in 1614. It is known to have circulated in manuscript as early as 1610. A copy of it was apparently seen in this year by one Adam Haselmeyer of whom virtually nothing is known with any certainty. The existence of Haselmeyer’s ‘reply’ to the Fama was independently printed in 1612. The ‘reply’ was thereafter printed in the first volume of the pamphlet/ document entitled the Universal and General Reformation of the Whole World; together with Fama Fraternitatis of the Laudable Fraternity of the Rosy Cross, written to all the Learned and Rulers of Europe; also a short reply sent by Herr Haselmeyer, for which he was seized by the Jesuits and put in irons in a Galley. Now put forth in print and communicated to all true hearts. Printed at Cassel by Wilhelm Wessel, 1614. 1

As is well known several of Ben Jonson’s later plays (with a certain degree of irony and humour) allude or explicitly refer to the Rosicrucian Brothers or the Rosicrucian movement. Yet until recently an allusion in The Alchemist had for nearly four hundred years remained unnoticed. The Alchemist was first printed in 1612. It was entered in the Stationers’ Register on 3 October 1610 and performed by the Kings Men the same year. Chambers points out that the composition date of 1610 is confirmed by the age of Dame Pliant who is 19 and was born in 1591. He further states that in view of the S. R. entry, one would take the production to have fallen in the earlier half of the year.2 By this reckoning Jonson probably began writing the play early in 1610, or perhaps some time in 1609, before going on to revise and complete the play in the early part of the following year. In the Fama we find the following famous passage:
                                                                                                                                               

After such a most laudable sort they did spend their lives; and although they were free from all diseases and pain, yet notwithstanding they could not live and pass their time appointed of God. The first of this Fraternity which dyed, and that in England, was J. O. as Brother C. long before had foretold him; he was very expert, and well learned in Cabala, as his Book called H. witnesseth: In England he is much spoken of, and chiefly because he cured a young Earl of Norfolk of the Leprosie.3

On turning to The Alchemist we meet with an allusion to this famous passage. In Jonson’s play Ananias and Tribulation holy brethren of Amsterdam visit Subtle in search of alchemical gold. Through the alchemical gold’s medicinal qualities Subtle tells them they will be able to further their cause:

         SUBTLE.                                        This qualifies, most!
                        Why, thus it should be, now you vnderstand.
                    Have I discours’d so vnto you, of our Stone?
                    And, of the good that it shall bring your cause?
                    Shew’d you, (beside the mayne of hiring forces
                    Abroad, drawing the Hollanders, your friends,
                     From th’ Indies, to serue you, with all their fleete)
                     That euen the med’cinall vse shall make you a faction,
                     And party in the realme? As, put the case,
                     That some great man in state, he haue the gout,
                     Why, you but send three droppes of your Elixir,
                     You helpe him straight: there you haue made a friend.
                     Another has the palsey, or the dropsie,
                     He takes of your incombustible stuffe,
                    Hee’s yong againe: there you have made a friend.
                    A Lady, that is past the feate of body,
                    Though not of minde, and hath her face decay’d
                    Beyond all cure of paintings, you restore
                    With the oil of Talck; there you haue made a friend:
                     And all her friends. A lord, that is a Leper,
                     A knight, that has the bone-ache, or a squire
                    That hath both these, you make ’hem smooth, and sound,
                    With a bare fricace of your med’cine: still,
                    You increase your friends.

                                                  [The Alchemist: 3: 2: 18-41]4 

That the anonymously published Fama Fraternitatis is the equivalent of Bacon’s utopia the New Atlantis (or, Land of the Rosicrucians) is repeatedly confirmed by a textual comparative analysis, its common themes, its similarities in content and style, and numerous other points of contact.
   In addition to the manuscript copy seen by Ben Jonson it is strongly probable that numerous other manuscript copies of the Fama Fraternitatis were circulating in England and Scotland and on the European continent around this time and certainly sometime shortly afterwards, the earliest known of which was owned by David Lindsay, first Lord Lindsay of Balcarres (1587-1642), a contemporary of Lord Bacon. As seen below his ancestor Sir Ronald Lindsay was at the opening of the Folger Shakespeare Library.  

The Folger Shakespeare library officially opened on 23 April 1932 supposedly the 368th birthday of William Shakspere and the date (23 April) that he is said to have died in 1616. It is of course well-known that 23 April is St George’s Day, though it is less well known that the patron saint invariably portrayed with a red cross very similar to the red cross of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood is the saint after whom early Freemasons named their Lodges. 
    The special opening ceremony attracted a list of distinguished guests from around the world among them ambassadors from Great Britain, Germany and France; various members of Congress, Justices of the US Supreme Court and dignitaries from US colleges and universities. And with good reason the British Ambassador to the United States Sir Ronald Lindsay (Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St Michael and St George) was invited to participate in the opening of the Rosicrucian Temple or Shrine to Bacon-Shakespeare. He was the fifth son of James Lindsay, 26th Earl of Crawford whose ancestor David Lindsay, first Lord Lindsay of Balcarres (1587-1642), owner of the earliest known English manuscript version of the two Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama Fraternitatis and Confessio Fraternitatis first published anonymously at Cassel in Germany in 1614 and 1615 respectively. This manuscript containing the Fama and Confessio dates at least as early as 1633 and may be even earlier. It shares many similarities with the Thomas Vaughan text, the English version of the Fame and Confession that first saw print in 1652, which cryptically revealed Bacon’s authorship on its title page. Both the Lindsay and Vaughan texts most likely independently derive from a common ancestor via a copy of the original manuscript of the Rosicrucian manifestos,5 directly or indirectly from their anonymous author, Lord Bacon.    


1. For a translation of the ‘Reply’ by Adam Haselmeyer see F. N. Pryce, ed., The Fame And Confession of the Fraternity Of R:C:  Commonly, of the Rosie Cross...Originally printed in London in 1652 (Margate: printed for the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia, 1923), pp. 57-64. See also Frances A. Yates, The Rosicrucian Enlightenment (London and New York: Routledge, 1972, reprinted 1986), pp. 41-42, 235. 

2. E. K. Chambers, The Elizabethan Stage (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1923), III, p. 371.

3. Anon., The Fame And Confession Of The Fraternity Of R: C: Commonly, of the Rosie Cross. With A Preface annexed thereto, and a short Declaration of their Physicall Work. By Eugenius Philalethes (London: printed by J. M. for Giles Calvert, 1652), p. 16.

4. C. H. Herford and Percy Simpson, eds., Ben Jonson (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1954), V, pp. 343-44.  The first to draw attention to the passage and line in a Rosicrucian context was Frances A. Yates, Shakespeare Last Plays: A New Approach (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1975), pp. 112-13.

5. F. N. Pryce, ed., The Fame And Confession of the Fraternity Of R:C:  Commonly, of the Rosie Cross...Originally printed in London in 1652 (Margate: printed for the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia, 1923), pp. 3-8. For the cryptic signature revealing and confirming Bacon’s authorship on the title page of the Fame and Confession, see Alfred Dodd, Francis Bacon’s Personal Life-Story (London: Rider & Company, 1986), p. 105.  
 

 

fama.jpg

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FAMA FRATERNITATIS is 173 Simple and 74 Short cipher.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

image.png.b91c67acb244ae635dd2024c91375a32.png

In the Sonnets Pyramid design Day 173 begins on Line 1019 of the Sonnets in Sonnet 73 and ends in Line in 1025 Sonnet 74.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Line1019

image.png.7817cd0abed1db1bed53a6598e619897.png

74 is the Simple cipher of both WILLIAM and TUDOR. So where is the BACON?

Here is a cool visual of these exact Lines:

image.png.36a10fcc71915386cdfb4ca9e32ca535.png

EDIT:

Yann has in the past pointed out that 173 is 17 (R) and 3 (C) so that 173 can be R.C. 😉

EDIT2:

If anyone wants more cool cipher clues from Sonnets 72-74, this might be of interest. 😉

 

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13 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

74 is the Simple cipher of both WILLIAM and TUDOR. So where is the BACON?

Just want to throw this out there as well. The Short cipher of the first letters of Sonnet 74 is 33 which is the Simple cipher of BACON.

https://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet074

image.png.c02515d5ce1c412db318cb735ebaac82.png

 

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17 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

THE EARLIEST KNOWN PRINTED EDITION OF THE FIRST ROSICRUCIAN MANIFESTO THE FAMA FRATERNITATIS IN 1614

The earliest known printed edition of the first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis appeared at Cassel in Germany in 1614. It is known to have circulated in manuscript as early as 1610. A copy of it was apparently seen in this year by one Adam Haselmeyer of whom virtually nothing is known with any certainty. The existence of Haselmeyer’s ‘reply’ to the Fama was independently printed in 1612. The ‘reply’ was thereafter printed in the first volume of the pamphlet/ document entitled the Universal and General Reformation of the Whole World; together with Fama Fraternitatis of the Laudable Fraternity of the Rosy Cross, written to all the Learned and Rulers of Europe; also a short reply sent by Herr Haselmeyer, for which he was seized by the Jesuits and put in irons in a Galley. Now put forth in print and communicated to all true hearts. Printed at Cassel by Wilhelm Wessel, 1614. 1

As is well known several of Ben Jonson’s later plays (with a certain degree of irony and humour) allude or explicitly refer to the Rosicrucian Brothers or the Rosicrucian movement. Yet until recently an allusion in The Alchemist had for nearly four hundred years remained unnoticed. The Alchemist was first printed in 1612. It was entered in the Stationers’ Register on 3 October 1610 and performed by the Kings Men the same year. Chambers points out that the composition date of 1610 is confirmed by the age of Dame Pliant who is 19 and was born in 1591. He further states that in view of the S. R. entry, one would take the production to have fallen in the earlier half of the year.2 By this reckoning Jonson probably began writing the play early in 1610, or perhaps some time in 1609, before going on to revise and complete the play in the early part of the following year. In the Fama we find the following famous passage:
                                                                                                                                               

After such a most laudable sort they did spend their lives; and although they were free from all diseases and pain, yet notwithstanding they could not live and pass their time appointed of God. The first of this Fraternity which dyed, and that in England, was J. O. as Brother C. long before had foretold him; he was very expert, and well learned in Cabala, as his Book called H. witnesseth: In England he is much spoken of, and chiefly because he cured a young Earl of Norfolk of the Leprosie.3

On turning to The Alchemist we meet with an allusion to this famous passage. In Jonson’s play Ananias and Tribulation holy brethren of Amsterdam visit Subtle in search of alchemical gold. Through the alchemical gold’s medicinal qualities Subtle tells them they will be able to further their cause:

         SUBTLE.                                        This qualifies, most!
                        Why, thus it should be, now you vnderstand.
                    Have I discours’d so vnto you, of our Stone?
                    And, of the good that it shall bring your cause?
                    Shew’d you, (beside the mayne of hiring forces
                    Abroad, drawing the Hollanders, your friends,
                     From th’ Indies, to serue you, with all their fleete)
                     That euen the med’cinall vse shall make you a faction,
                     And party in the realme? As, put the case,
                     That some great man in state, he haue the gout,
                     Why, you but send three droppes of your Elixir,
                     You helpe him straight: there you haue made a friend.
                     Another has the palsey, or the dropsie,
                     He takes of your incombustible stuffe,
                    Hee’s yong againe: there you have made a friend.
                    A Lady, that is past the feate of body,
                    Though not of minde, and hath her face decay’d
                    Beyond all cure of paintings, you restore
                    With the oil of Talck; there you haue made a friend:
                     And all her friends. A lord, that is a Leper,
                     A knight, that has the bone-ache, or a squire
                    That hath both these, you make ’hem smooth, and sound,
                    With a bare fricace of your med’cine: still,
                    You increase your friends.

                                                  [The Alchemist: 3: 2: 18-41]4 

That the anonymously published Fama Fraternitatis is the equivalent of Bacon’s utopia the New Atlantis (or, Land of the Rosicrucians) is repeatedly confirmed by a textual comparative analysis, its common themes, its similarities in content and style, and numerous other points of contact.
   In addition to the manuscript copy seen by Ben Jonson it is strongly probable that numerous other manuscript copies of the Fama Fraternitatis were circulating in England and Scotland and on the European continent around this time and certainly sometime shortly afterwards, the earliest known of which was owned by David Lindsay, first Lord Lindsay of Balcarres (1587-1642), a contemporary of Lord Bacon. As seen below his ancestor Sir Ronald Lindsay was at the opening of the Folger Shakespeare Library.  

The Folger Shakespeare library officially opened on 23 April 1932 supposedly the 368th birthday of William Shakspere and the date (23 April) that he is said to have died in 1616. It is of course well-known that 23 April is St George’s Day, though it is less well known that the patron saint invariably portrayed with a red cross very similar to the red cross of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood is the saint after whom early Freemasons named their Lodges. 
    The special opening ceremony attracted a list of distinguished guests from around the world among them ambassadors from Great Britain, Germany and France; various members of Congress, Justices of the US Supreme Court and dignitaries from US colleges and universities. And with good reason the British Ambassador to the United States Sir Ronald Lindsay (Knight Grand Cross of the Order of St Michael and St George) was invited to participate in the opening of the Rosicrucian Temple or Shrine to Bacon-Shakespeare. He was the fifth son of James Lindsay, 26th Earl of Crawford whose ancestor David Lindsay, first Lord Lindsay of Balcarres (1587-1642), owner of the earliest known English manuscript version of the two Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama Fraternitatis and Confessio Fraternitatis first published anonymously at Cassel in Germany in 1614 and 1615 respectively. This manuscript containing the Fama and Confessio dates at least as early as 1633 and may be even earlier. It shares many similarities with the Thomas Vaughan text, the English version of the Fame and Confession that first saw print in 1652, which cryptically revealed Bacon’s authorship on its title page. Both the Lindsay and Vaughan texts most likely independently derive from a common ancestor via a copy of the original manuscript of the Rosicrucian manifestos,5 directly or indirectly from their anonymous author, Lord Bacon.    


1. For a translation of the ‘Reply’ by Adam Haselmeyer see F. N. Pryce, ed., The Fame And Confession of the Fraternity Of R:C:  Commonly, of the Rosie Cross...Originally printed in London in 1652 (Margate: printed for the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia, 1923), pp. 57-64. See also Frances A. Yates, The Rosicrucian Enlightenment (London and New York: Routledge, 1972, reprinted 1986), pp. 41-42, 235. 

2. E. K. Chambers, The Elizabethan Stage (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1923), III, p. 371.

3. Anon., The Fame And Confession Of The Fraternity Of R: C: Commonly, of the Rosie Cross. With A Preface annexed thereto, and a short Declaration of their Physicall Work. By Eugenius Philalethes (London: printed by J. M. for Giles Calvert, 1652), p. 16.

4. C. H. Herford and Percy Simpson, eds., Ben Jonson (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1954), V, pp. 343-44.  The first to draw attention to the passage and line in a Rosicrucian context was Frances A. Yates, Shakespeare Last Plays: A New Approach (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1975), pp. 112-13.

5. F. N. Pryce, ed., The Fame And Confession of the Fraternity Of R:C:  Commonly, of the Rosie Cross...Originally printed in London in 1652 (Margate: printed for the Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia, 1923), pp. 3-8. For the cryptic signature revealing and confirming Bacon’s authorship on the title page of the Fame and Confession, see Alfred Dodd, Francis Bacon’s Personal Life-Story (London: Rider & Company, 1986), p. 105.  
 

 

fama.jpg

It's a work associated to the scholars based at Tubingen University. Andrea was there at the time. Andrea had already written the Chemical Wedding of CR prior to this work. Its a work of what is is called Protestant Utopians. The Protestant Utopian movement travelled to Britain via Samuel Hartlib and John Amos Comenius. Hartlib is described as a Baconian by some. via Wikipedia--"Hartlib was indebted to Francis Bacon for a general theory of education that formed common ground for him and Jan Comenius." "Bacon had formulated a project for a research institute entitled "Salomon's House" in his New Atlantis of 1624. This theoretical scheme was important for Hartlib, who angled during the 1640s for public funding for it", "The "Hartlib circle" of contacts and correspondents, built up from about 1630, was one of the foundations of the Royal Society of London established a generation later. The relationship, however, is not transparent, as Hartlib and his close supporters, with the exception of William Petty, were excluded from the Royal Society when it was set up in 1660".

Thomas Vaughn translated this work into English much later. The Rosicrucian manifestos also contain the same focus on current celestial events that Johanes Kepler (who studied at Tubingen) wrote about. He had already placed the rose and the cross at the heart of the nova appearance of 1600.  All the influences here are German. Jakob Böhme is a key inspiration in all this.

All indications are that German Rosicrucianism has links to Bacon only as a source of inspiration for the dissemination of knowledge in the English language. It would explain why Maier would have give Bacon an honorary title. 

One can spend long hours trying to locate anyone who believes Francis Bacon wrote this work.

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3 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

One can spend long hours trying to locate anyone who believes Francis Bacon wrote this work.

Or a lifetime wondering if or how much he wrote.

It certainly appears Bacon was involved and connected. Maybe merely as an inspiration or as the primary creator. Not unlike the Shakespeare works.

In my professional web and marketing world, I often take on the role of the owner or of the entire business for clients who trust me to perform as them. No need for me to leave ciphers for the future as a check in my bank is all I need. LOL

But maybe the R.C. is more effective with an actual person as a mythical head, even if it is a fact or not. Bacon fits the Rosicrucian concept and investing his role is a great path for many who learn the teachings by pursuing who is involved. I know it is a topic easily debated, but for some of us, it is a valid path to learn so much.

I have fun with the idea of Bacon as the RC Founder when seeking clues. Regardless of the final destination, the road is incredibly exciting.

..............

Our air conditioning is out here at our home. August in Florida is not a good time for no A/C, I may be very grouchy if the emergency service call this afternoon results in no fix today. I am already hot and sweaty, likely starting to stink!  Feels like a sauna. UGH

 

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     Francis Bacon, Founder of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood and secret author of the Universal Reformation of the Whole World and its two anonymous                                                                                              Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama Fraternitatis and Confessio Fraternitatis.

Even though the following evidence, facts and information was either unknown to or systematically suppressed by authors of the mainstream works on Francis Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians, from the beginning members of his Rosicrucian Brotherhood repeatedly pointed to the fact that he was its Founding Father, author of its Rosicrucian manifestos, and our secret Shakespeare.

The first of these of interest to us appeared at Venice in 1612 a work entitled De Raggvagli Di Parnaso put forward in the name of Trajano Boccalini who died the following year in 1613. In a very curious work running to nearly five hundred pages appears the 77th Advertisement ‘GENERALE RIFORMA dell’ Vniuerso da i fette Sauij della Grecia, et da altri Letterati publicata di ordine Apollo’ (A Universal Reformation of the Whole Wide World, by order of the God Apollo, is published by the Seven Sages of Greece and some other Litterati) in which Apollo attempts to initiate A Universal Reformation of the World.1 It was printed in German as The Universal Reformation of the Whole World in the booklet/pamphlet containing the first anonymous Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis (written by Bacon) published at Cassel in 1614. It is an account of how Apollo (repeatedly likened to Bacon in the Memoriae containing 32 verses conveying that he was the secret poet and dramatist Shakespeare) sets his sights on a general reformation of the world.

The first English translation of Ragguagli di Parnasso (Advertisements from Parnassus) was issued in the name of one Henry, Earl of Monmouth under the title I Ragguagli di Parnasso: or Advertisements from Parnassus in Two Centuries (London:  printed for Humphrey Moseley, 1657). The inside page of the volume carries a portrait of 'Monmouth'. This instructive frontispiece is deliberately cut backwards so the motto around the portrait can only be read correctly by holding the page up to the light and looking through the paper which reveals (as is its purpose) a watermark in the shape of a vase. Within the vase there are three letters. The upper letter is B and the two letters below it are RC which presumably stands for Bacon of the Rosy Cross. In the same year Dr Rawley edited and published the Resuscitatio (London: printed by Sarah Griffin for William Lee, 1657) containing the first English Life of Lord Bacon. If the null '6' is dropped from the date 1657 it leaves 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher.

A second translation of the tract appeared in the name of N. N. Esquire entitled Advertisements From Parnassus....Newly done into English, and adapted to the Present Times (London: 1704). The unidentified (as far as I am aware) N. N. Esquire freely departed from the more literal translation of 1657. In the original English translation Jacobi Malloni de Casena is secretary to the congregation, that is secretary to Apollo, whereas in the 1704 version, N. N. Esquire in lifting the veil a little, makes Lord Bacon secretary to Apollo 'in honour of the English philosophers, he made Sir Francis Bacon Secretary to the Society', (pp. 27-8), in other words Founder or Imperator of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood.

The second Rosicrucian manifesto the Confessio Fraterniatis contains a piece of simply devastating information not mentioned by Stratfordian authorities, orthodox Shakespeare biographers, editors or commentators. Its secret anonymous author Bacon points out how easily the so-called learned or learned fools, and the rest of the credulous world, are easily deceived with enigmas and illusions. One of them being of his own creation, which has misled and beguiled the sleepy universities and academia around the globe for centuries: 

For conclusion of our Confession we must earnestly admonish you, that you cast away, if not all, yet most of the worthless books of pseudo chymists, to whom it is a jest to apply the Most Holy Trinity to vain things, or to deceive men with monstrous symbols and enigmas, or to profit by the curiosity of the credulous; our age doth produce many such, one of the greatest being a stage-player, a man with sufficient ingenuity for imposition; [my italics] such doth the enemy of human welfare mingle among the good seed, thereby to make the truth more difficult to be believed, which in herself is simple and naked, while falshood is proud, haughty, and coloured with a lustre of seeming godly and humane wisdom.2

                                                                                       OUR AGE DOTH PRODUCE MANY SUCH, ONE OF THE GREATEST BEING A

                                                                                       STAGE-PLAYER, A MAN WITH SUFFICIENT INGENUITY FOR IMPOSTION

The following year 1616, the year in which Bacon’s literary mask William Shakspere died, there was published at Amsterdam a very rare Rosicrucian work. The enigmatic work contains fifty illustrations with Latin verses beneath them. Emblem 1 sees Fortune standing upon a globe (an allusion to the Globe Theatre) with one hand pushing from the pinnacle of Fame a man dressed as an actor with a feather in his hat; and the other, raising up a man wearing the familiar Bacon hat (in nearly all portraits he is presented wearing the hat of the Grand Master of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood), whose face is hidden. Confirmation it is Bacon comes in the form of the initial letters from the ninth line in the verse ‘Obscaenumque nimis crepuit, Fortuna Batavis Appellanda’, an anagram which yields F BACON.3

The secret anonymous authorship of the two Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama and Confessio was cryptically revealed by Dr John Wilkins, the warden of Wadham College, Oxford, Master of Trinity College, Cambridge, and afterwards first Secretary of the Rosicrucian Royal Society, in his work entitled Mathematicall Magick. While discussing subterranean lamps the Baconian disciple and Rosicrucian Brother Dr Wilkins makes the following remarkable statement:

                Such a lamp is likewise related to be seen in the sepulchre of Francis Rosicrosse, as is more largely expressed in the confession of that fraternity.4

The lamp is referred to in the Fama not the Confessio, an artful Rosicrucian device employed by Dr Wilkins to draw attention to a passage in which the Christian name of Bacon, ‘Francis’ is directly aligned with the Brotherhood of the Rose Cross, ‘Rosicrosse’, in relation to its two manifestos at once indicating two profound secrets: Francis Bacon was the Founding Father of the Brotherhood of the Rosy Cross and the concealed author of its two manifestos the Fame and the Confession.

A few years after the Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Royal Society was formed in the second half of the seventeenth century with Dr Wilkins appointed its first secretary, its official historian Thomas Sprat published The History of the Royal Society with a very important frontispiece.

At its centre it depicts a bust of King Charles II, with William Brouncker, its first president to his right, and on his left Francis Bacon, the Founding Father of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood. Its prime mover Lord Bacon is sitting under the prominent winged angel holding a trumpet which alludes to his first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis that ends with ‘Sub Umbra Alarum Tuarum Jehova’ (‘under the shadow of Jehova’s wings’):

The first impression is the Masonic pavement in the forefront of the picture. It pushes towards the viewer so that it cannot be ignored. All Masons are told about the black and white chequered floor of the lodge room…

 The compasses and squares, of which there are four compasses and three squares in the plate, are described in Masonic ritual as follows: ‘The compasses and square, when united regulate our lives and our actions. The compasses belong to the Grand Master in particular and the square to the whole craft.’…

   Finally there is the positioning of the three figures. The seating of the officers of a lodge of Freemasons is very carefully controlled. Charles is placed as the Grand Master in the East, with the light of the rising sun behind him. Brouncker is placed in the seat of the senior working officer while Bacon is placed in the seat of the immediate Past Master.…Bacon…is [also] shown in the frontispiece…wearing the jewel and collar of a Chaplain of the Lodge of Edinburgh.5

 

MODERN SCHOLARS WHO KNOW/BELIEVE THAT FRANCIS BACON WAS THE FOUNDING FATHER OF THE ROSICRUCIAN BROTHERHOOD AND SECRET AUTHOR OF ITS MANIFESTOS AND OTHER EARLY DOCUMENTS.

Bacon’s Hand to be traced in the famous Rosicrucian Manifestoes…

It seems to us we can find traces of Bacon’s mind in the “Fama Fraternitatis,” or “Universal Reformation”

To those who believe that Bacon wrote the plays ascribed to Shakespeare, and who like ourselves, that he was the Master Spirit, who was the founder and originator of the Rosicrucians…

                                         [W. F. C. Wigston, Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians (London: George Redway, 1898), pp. xxi, 16, 22]

                                [THE] “Chemical Marriage of Christian Rosenkreuz,” which we now find to be written by Francis Bacon at the age of fifteen.

                                       [C. M. Pott, Francis Bacon and his Secret Society (Chicago : Francis J. Schulte & Company, 1891), p. 260]

In fact those enthusiasts who for years have struggled to identify Sir Francis Bacon as the true “Bard of Avon” might long since have won their case had they emphasized its most important angle, namely, that Sir Francis Bacon, the Rosicrucian initiate, wrote into the Shakespearian plays the secret teachings of the Fraternity of R. C. and the rituals of the Freemasonic Order, of which order it may yet be discovered that he was the actual founder.

[Manly P. Hall, An Encyclopedic Outline of Masonic, Hermetic, Qabbalisitic and Rosicrucian Symbolical Philosophy (Los Angeles: The Philosophical Research Society, Inc., 1928, reprinted 1988), p. CLXVI]

The real author of the pamphlets [Fama and Confessio] that brought about the revival in Germany was none other than Sir Francis Bacon, who was the Imperator for the Order in England and various parts of Europe.

[H. Spencer Lewis, F.R.C., Rosicrucian Questions and Answers With Complete History of The Rosicrucian Order (San Jose, California: Supreme Grand Lodge of AMORC, 1929, reprinted 1954), p. 121]

Several writers have produced convincing evidence that Bacon was the father of the Rosi Crosse Society…It is known, by reference to them in his New Atlantis, that Bacon had plans to create other orders besides Knights of the Helmet and the Rosi Crosse Society.

                                                                             [George V. Tudhope, Bacon-Masonry (1954), pp. 30-31]

The Rosicrucian Fraternity made itself known to the world, however, by the publication of the anonymous work in Germany about the year 1614, and its was followed by a series of anonymous pamphlets with ethical principles and spiritual knowledge. The most important are The Fama, The Confessio, and The Chymical Marriage. And the startling fact emerges that the very first pamphlet laid it down that the Rosicrucians had as their goal “The Reformation of the Whole Wide World,”, which we know to-day (what the world did not know then), was the ideal of the boy Francis conceived by him when at the University. Those Rosicrucian pamphlets are full of Francis Bacon’s ideas.

                                                   [Alfred Dodd, Francis Bacon’s Personal Life-Story (London: Rider & Company, 1986), p. 106]

It is my opinion, supported by a sound structure of proof, that the Rosicrucian Society was founded during the opening years of the 17th century by the English statesman and philosopher, Sir Francis Bacon, as part of his plan for a general political reform of the states of Europe.

                                        [Manly P. Hall, The Riddle of the Rosicrucians (Los Angeles: The Philosophical Research Society, 1996), p. 39]

The aims of Fra. C. R. C. and the Rosicrucian fraternity, as laid out in the Rosicrucian manifestos and subsequent publications, and the great ideas and project of Francis Bacon, are identical-viz. to cause a complete world-wide revolution or reformation in human consciousness and society, leading to a Golden Age of wisdom, peace, prosperity and brotherly love. These aims are identical for the simple reason that they are both from the same source.

                                     [Peter Dawkins, Bacon, Shakespeare & Fra. Christian Rose Cross (The Francis Bacon Research Trust, 1991), p. 11]

There followed then in the three succeeding years three Rosicrucian Manifestos, which were first published in Germany through the liaisons between England and certain groups in Bohemia and the Palatine. These three Rosicrucian Manifestos [Fama, Confessio, and The Chemical Wedding] were the work of Francis Bacon.

                                              [Karl F. Hollenbach, Francis Rosicross (Ekron, Kentucky: Dunsinane Hill Publications, 1996), p. 84]

The second decade of the seventeenth century saw the publication of three successive “Rosicrucian Manifestos”, i.e. the Fama Fraternitatis (1614), the Confessio Fraternitatis (1615), and the Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz (1616).

Although the three manifestos had been written anonymously, they clearly have Bacon’s fingerprints all over them. The Rosicrucian Movement had finally been given a stated purpose which bore an uncanny resemblance to Bacon’s Great Instauration—along with a blueprint for the establishment of a Rosicrucian utopia. Indeed, the Confessio Fraternitatis was a precursor to Bacon’s later work, titled The New Atlantis.

                                [Richard Allan Wagner, 32nd Degree, ‘The Truth about the Freemasons', (2015), republished on B’Hive Forum, 15 June 2022]

 

[For another 31 articles on Francis Bacon and the Rosicrucians see A. M. Challinor, Francis Bacon Philosopher, Statesman, Poet: An Index to Baconiana and its Predecessors, 1886-1999 (The Francis Bacon Society, 2001), p. 134]

 

1. Trajano Boccalini, De Raggvagli Di Parnaso Di Traiano Boccalini Romano. Centuria Prima (In Venetia, Apresso Pietro Farri. MDCXII), pp. 326-64.

2. A. E. Waite, The Real History of the Rosicrucians founded on their own Manifestos, and on facts and documents collected from the writings of Initiated Brethren (London: George Redway, 1887), p. 96.

3. Cornelii Giselberti Plempii, Amsterodamun Monogrammon (Amsterodami Apud Ioannem Walschardum, 1616), Emblem 1.

4. John Wilkins, Mathematicall Magick Or, The Wonders That May be performed by Mechanical Geometry (London: printed by M. F. for Sa. Gellibrand, 1648), pp. 236-37.

5. Robert Lomas, The Invisible College: The Royal Society, Freemasonry and the Birth of Modern Science (London: BCA, 2002), pp. 72-73, 100.

Plempii emblem.png

Frontispiece-to-The-History-of-the-Royal-Society-of-London-by-Thomas-Sprat.jpg

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22 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Even though the following evidence, facts and information was either unknown to or systematically suppressed by authors of the mainstream works on Francis Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians, from the beginning members of his Rosicrucian Brotherhood repeatedly pointed to the fact that he was its Founding Father, author of its Rosicrucian manifestos, and our secret Shakespeare.

I tend to think I just read a lot of "inside" information regarding whatever "Rosicrucian" means today. Funny how nobody has ever told me they are a Rosicrcucian when Freemasons have no problem saying it out-loud. I sometimes wonder if one knows if one is a Rosicrucian or not.

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A. Phoenix, may I ask your thoughts on who and what Bacon's Rosicrucian Brotherhood is today? I asked AI, "Claude" today about the website for Rosicucians as Kate likes Claude:

image.png.8bbf0df83828b72c05c601711182c977.png

I suspect there is an "Invisible College" in the Shadows or Behind the Veil. Maybe that is a fantasy as I do not belong to any group right now.

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9 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I suspect there is an "Invisible College" in the Shadows or Behind the Veil. Maybe that is a fantasy as I do not belong to any group right now.

I guess when I look at the AMORC website, I think right here at home on the B'Hive with A. Phoenix, Eric, Kate, RoyalCraftiness, Yann, and others I am learning more about Bacon's "New Atlantis" Rosicrucian Brotherhood than I would joining any modern organization with its steps and initiations, rituals, etc.

Hey did you know BACON ROSICRUCIAN is 157 Simple cipher and 365 Kaye cipher? To me that hints at the Sonnets Pyramid design.

image.png.afbcd9519eccc3ce583361659a82581c.png

I guess I am a Bacon Rosicrucian. There was no application, and the initiation never ends, and I don't have a bumper sticker for my car, but the Rewards are spectacular! LOL

 

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Hi Rob,

Here is what I think.

The Rosicrucian Brotherhood are what might be described as the secret inner sanctum of the Freemasonry Brotherhood (something unbeknown to the ordinary members of the Order) who secretly directs its world-wide aims, objective and operations. It has close (which is virtually unknown to the world) links to UK and US intelligence, and directly and indirectly large international media corporations, important publishing houses, leading universities and prestigious university presses (Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard, etc) and counts among its members well-known orthodox Bacon and Shakespeare scholars. These scholars say one thing in public while privately knowing the truth about Lord Bacon's secret life and writings, including ,of course, his authorship of the Rosicrucian manifestos & the Shakespeare works. It is Lord Bacon, his Rosicrucian Brotherhood and the Baconian-Rosicrucian Royal Society, who are primarily responsible for the scientific, technological and medical innovations of the modern world, and so much more that is all around us, some of it hidden in plain sight. The magnificent self-declared aim of the divine Baconian-Rosicrucian Brotherhood is the Universal Reformation of the Whole World where one day we will all be able to live in perfect peace and harmony for which it has worked secretly and invisibly on our behalf for the last four hundred years.    

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15 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

The magnificent self-declared aim of the divine Baconian-Rosicrucian Brotherhood is the Universal Reformation of the Whole World where one day we will all be able to live in perfect peace and harmony for which it has worked secretly and invisibly on our behalf for the last four hundred years.    

I'd like that on a bumper sticker for my car. 😉

 

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Just playing with Synchronicity, for fun.

UNIVERSAL REFORMATION OF THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD is 188 Short cipher which is the Kaye cipher for JOHN DEE. 188 is also the Kaye cipher for ETERNITY.

Typically we see those words like this, "Universal Reformation of the Whole Wide World".

Capital letters UR WWW is 100 Simple which is the Simple cipher of FRANCIS BACON.

UR WWW is 100 is Kaye cipher as is TUDOR.

The first letters of the two lower case words are "o t" or 33 Simple cipher the same as BACON.

Just playing, listening to music with words syncing with thoughts, numbers and letters connecting on random paths. The only direction for me is towards the Universal Reformation of the Whole Wide World.

 

 

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13 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

It's a work associated to the scholars based at Tubingen University. Andrea was there at the time. Andrea had already written the Chemical Wedding of CR prior to this work. Its a work of what is is called Protestant Utopians. The Protestant Utopian movement travelled to Britain via Samuel Hartlib and John Amos Comenius. Hartlib is described as a Baconian by some. via Wikipedia--"Hartlib was indebted to Francis Bacon for a general theory of education that formed common ground for him and Jan Comenius." "Bacon had formulated a project for a research institute entitled "Salomon's House" in his New Atlantis of 1624. This theoretical scheme was important for Hartlib, who angled during the 1640s for public funding for it", "The "Hartlib circle" of contacts and correspondents, built up from about 1630, was one of the foundations of the Royal Society of London established a generation later. The relationship, however, is not transparent, as Hartlib and his close supporters, with the exception of William Petty, were excluded from the Royal Society when it was set up in 1660".

Thomas Vaughn translated this work into English much later. The Rosicrucian manifestos also contain the same focus on current celestial events that Johanes Kepler (who studied at Tubingen) wrote about. He had already placed the rose and the cross at the heart of the nova appearance of 1600.  All the influences here are German. Jakob Böhme is a key inspiration in all this.

All indications are that German Rosicrucianism has links to Bacon only as a source of inspiration for the dissemination of knowledge in the English language. It would explain why Maier would have give Bacon an honorary title. 

One can spend long hours trying to locate anyone who believes Francis Bacon wrote this work.

Two questions, CJ. 

1. What is your aim?

If it is to provide a critique of A. Phoenix's work, you need to demonstrate that you have studied his papers without prejudice. You would then need to back up your own  assertions with convincing references. As it is, it is difficult not to conclude that for some reason you feel it necessary to take a superficial pot shot, or lazy, unreferenced  dismissal of a highly complex argument based on many, many years of dedicated research which has been abundantly referenced. How much have you written and published over the years?

2. Who, in your opinion, wrote the Shakespeare plays and poems?

I look forward to your answer.

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18 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Or a lifetime wondering if or how much he wrote.

It certainly appears Bacon was involved and connected. Maybe merely as an inspiration or as the primary creator. Not unlike the Shakespeare works.

In my professional web and marketing world, I often take on the role of the owner or of the entire business for clients who trust me to perform as them. No need for me to leave ciphers for the future as a check in my bank is all I need. LOL

But maybe the R.C. is more effective with an actual person as a mythical head, even if it is a fact or not. Bacon fits the Rosicrucian concept and investing his role is a great path for many who learn the teachings by pursuing who is involved. I know it is a topic easily debated, but for some of us, it is a valid path to learn so much.

I have fun with the idea of Bacon as the RC Founder when seeking clues. Regardless of the final destination, the road is incredibly exciting.

..............

Our air conditioning is out here at our home. August in Florida is not a good time for no A/C, I may be very grouchy if the emergency service call this afternoon results in no fix today. I am already hot and sweaty, likely starting to stink!  Feels like a sauna. UGH

 

Seeking clues to what? Bacon's Philosophy? What is it? I encourage you to read about the scholars at Tubingen and where their philosophy comes from. It does not originate with Bacon. Bacon was probably interested in their ideas.

I'm more interested in the people who claim to know when all that seems to be known is a sort of proof by evidence that is not known to even be in play.

The real question here is: is there a relationship between the Rosy Cross and Rosicrucianism, or are we talking about two things referencing a much older mythology. Why is Kepler talking about the Rose and the Cross before the appearance of the Fama? Do all writers who have ever touched on the Rose and the Cross trace back to Bacon? It seems pretty obvious that they don't. Anyone could have modelled an idea on it, and many did. Bacon could have some relationship to a fraternal group that did use it, and they may differ in their ideas about the myth of the Rose and the Cross. Keep in mind that much of Bacon's works is built upon Hebrew and Greek mythological imagery. Some would have him very close to the Kabbalists...What's he favoring?

The inspiration for all this is Biblical and it has much to do with the mystery of the resurrection of the dead that is first hinted to in the book of Daniel (from dust to the position of the stars). There are many views about this afterlife. There are the ancient Hebrew views, the Platonic/Pythagorean views of it,  the Pauline views of it, the Augustinian views on it, the Hermetic views of it and even the closer Paracelsian views of it. The Utopia of the Utopians is captured in the idea of heaven. What kind of Utopia would it be? What was the "City of God" going to look like? Who was right and how did they know? What sort of reliable evidence could have been traced to know? What does Bacon think of it? Did he favor the German Rosicrucian views or Enochian views? What was his cosmology and what was theirs? Is Bacon an alchemist? Does he believe that he can trace the time and place when alchemical projection to the higher realm is possible by using cycles? Will he look to astronomical events hinted by others to find the time and place where it is possible? Or is it that he finds that has no merit and that he may have used their beliefs to signal to these people by involving the very things they were enamored with? You know, send them on a wild goose chase and have them discover a book (the Bible) for them to locate their answer (to use the Book as the guiding light). In these matters you cannot know, and yet there are plenty who profess to know. What could Bacon have possibly left us as a philosophy to deal with that? How do we start knowing?

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9 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Two questions, CJ. 

1. What is your aim?

If it is to provide a critique of A. Phoenix's work, you need to demonstrate that you have studied his papers without prejudice. You would then need to back up your own  assertions with convincing references. As it is, it is difficult not to conclude that for some reason you feel it necessary to take a superficial pot shot, or lazy, unreferenced  dismissal of a highly complex argument based on many, many years of dedicated research which has been abundantly referenced. How much have you written and published over the years?

2. Who, in your opinion, wrote the Shakespeare plays and poems?

I look forward to your answer.

I do not like to deal with him (or is it them), exactly as they do not like to deal with me. You need to respect both these positions.  You have the benefit of speaking to them more directly than I and you know much more than I do about their intentions. I would be guessing what they are. It appears to be to put a very respectable scholarly front to their already existing views. 

As far as I can recall I have not critiqued anyone here (in ad hominem fashion). I have only ever pushed back against some things by raising reasonable points. I have greatly held myself back if you care to know. I find that the questioning never goes as far as it should. It seems to stop when a type of suggestion is useful. 

Others have appeared here with their scholarly suggestions about who wrote Shakespeare. They've not been engaged with what would appear to be legitimate interest. Why is that?

The thing is that one doesn't even need to be considering that question. I'm not certain that question even needs to be asked. A starting point in dealing with it would be to ask why there are people who believe it is a valid question. I don't think the question of why is even answerable. If one is open to the idea of a conspiracy then why not a conspiracy to confuse or manipulate perceptions? That leaves the entire question of who as one that may be of no use whatsoever.  It's really not my cup of tea, but there are things like methods or points of knowledge one can comment about.

I've been attracted to Bacon for different reasons. Mainly the things he is known to have said and done. His philosophy interests me. The question of why so many have wanted a piece of him has always interested me. Attempts to link him to competing ideas have puzzled me. I greatly favor the idea that it is because he was English. He is an excellent figure head to want to raise to the position of being a monumental influence on Western Philosophy for his fellow Englishmen. His ideas about knowledge and the open sharing of information are extremely valuable.

I'd be lying if I did not also mention that I am interested in the Rawley's Sylva Sylvarum. That seems to be a legitimate mystery in his hand which is given to us. It's' an easy one to attach to the authorship question, but should we? I've never looked at it with that specifically in mind.

As you probably know I have been a fan of those who have lampooned the Masonic suggestions. But that does not mean I have not looked into if the opposite was possible. It may surprise you to know that I have greatly considered both cases. I have noticed for myself how a case can be made to satisfy any side. The Rosicrucian view is more clear cut. That's not Bacon's doing. That's a larger current that has contributed a theme for others to have created with. It does not mean that there was not a group with ideas about the Rose and the Cross in England. I don't equate Bacon with German mysticism. 

On the matter of credibility of the first institutionalized Baconians I have looked to the things written by a relative who was very aware of the interests of his family. I think that individual has important things to say about it. In his words, the mystery is not what people it is.  It's an interesting idea.

I also love myth and myths that involve Bacon. I like the subject matter and the composition of some of the title pages of the Baconian works. Someone is playing with them. To what effect is a good question. 

 

 

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