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Sir Henry Wotton and Francis Bacon; Rosicrucians?


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                                                                                                            De Morte (Of Death)

Hi Kate, 

We have just taken a quick look at the De Morte and here are some of our provisional observations.

In our view everything about this poem indicates that it was written by Lord Bacon which cryptically conveys the secret that Bacon is Shakespeare.

In the original 1651 edition of the Reliquiae Wottoniane the poem 'The World is a Bubble' was signed by 'Ignoto' (meaning Unknown or Anonymous) which in the later editions was printed in the name of Francis Bacon. I suggest the reason why the unknown author of the De Morte poem was never identified is for the reasons stated above that FB was the concealed supreme poet and dramatist Shakespeare.

There appears to be a number of hints that the poem was written by and is about the life of Lord Bacon.

As a great poet and dramatist he knows that the Life of Man is a great tragedy a theme that weaves its way through his great Shakespeare tragedies, i. e., Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth and King Lear as well as various other Shakespeare plays.

In the first line there is a nexus between tragedy and a Mother's Womb, perhaps an allusion to his royal mother Queen Elizabeth and the tragedy of how he was a concealed royal Prince of Wales and heir to the throne, a destiny never realised.

This spacious Earth (Richard II: 'This earth of Majesty, this seat of Mars') the Theatre and the Stage (As You Like It: 'All the World's a Stage'). That Country in which he lives (Richard II: 'this earth, this realm, this England') perhaps an allusion to his Shakespeare English History plays which culminate in Henry VIII wherein Queen Anne Boleyn gives birth to his royal mother Queen Elizabeth ('Who from the sacred ashes of her honour/Shall star-like rise, as great in fame as she was'). 

And Vice (repeated again below) perhaps an allusion to the first play written when he was just seven years old entitled Like Will to Like whose central character is named Nichol Newfangle the Vice, a morality play about Good and Evil, the very theme that runs trhoughout the whole of the Shakespeare canon (see A. Phoenix, 'The Play Like Will to Like'). With the first cry of The Prologue (King Lear : 'When we are born, we cry that we are come/To this great stage of fools') to the ensuing Tragedy/The former Act consisteth of dumb-shows' which seems to us to be a clear allusion to The Misfortunes of Arthur, the first play (or any printed work for that matter) with Lord Bacon's name attached to it, found on its last page, where it is stated the dumb shows were partly devised by Francis Bacon (see A. Phoenix, 'The Misfortunes of Arthur').

Then Death's his Epliogue-Bacon wrote an essay Of Death, as well as two full-length works entitled An Inquiry Concerning the Ways of Death, andThe History of Life and Death published in Latin in 1623 the same year as the Shakespeare First Folio.

This anonymous self-referential poem is clearly conveying that he is a man of the theatre 'Tragedy', 'Theatre', 'Stage', 'Actors', 'Prologue', 'dumb shows', etc, who writes comedies, histories and tragedies-The greatest man of the theatre our secret Shakespeare.

By way of confirmation the verse contains several Baconian ciphers. There are 94 words in the verse and 'Ignoto' has 6 letters: 94+6=100 Francis Bacon in simple cipher. The 94 words minus the 4 words contained within the brackets gives a total of 90 which plus the 13 italic letters 'De morte' and 'Ignoto': 90+13=103 Shakespeare in simple cipher cryptographically conveying that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare. 

 

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5 hours ago, Kate said:

Thanks for posting all this AP. Nothing about De Morte then? 

Or maybe nothing "yet"? 😉

I do see the connections to Bacon's prose "De Morte" (of Death).

I feel the magic of Shakespeare reading this poem, but also feel Bacon's suffering and depression. If this is not by Bacon, someone used his words and ideas to do their best to imitate him. I'm leaning that this was indeed Bacon and far from being one of his least affective statements.

23 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Mans life's a Tragedy: his mothers womb
(From which he enters) is the tyring room;
This spacious earth the Theater; and the Stage
That Country which he lives in: Passions, Rage,
Folly, and Vice are Actors: The first cry
The Prologue to th'ensuing Tragedy.

These ARE the words of Bacon and Shakespeare in my mind. Isn't a third of the Works Tragedy?

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

In our view everything about this poem indicates that it was written by Lord Bacon which cryptically conveys the secret that Bacon is Shakespeare.

InDeed!

I posted my passionate reply above before I read your post! But they are in sync! 🙂

I keep reading it and every time am closer to Bacon. It's been known for many years, but it is great that it pops again in 2023!

 

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On 7/26/2023 at 7:59 AM, Light-of-Truth said:

InDeed!

I posted my passionate reply above before I read your post! But they are in sync! 🙂

I keep reading it and every time am closer to Bacon. It's been known for many years, but it is great that it pops again in 2023!

 

Doge Leonardo Donato Giving Audience to Sir Henry Wotton

image.png.807bbc3f0b6b9d784dff7878f6bf8430.png

https://www.rct.uk/collection/search#/1/collection/403939/doge-leonardo-donato-giving-audience-to-sir-henry-wotton

In 1604, Henry Wotton (in black with his back to us) was sent to Venice as an ambassador by King James I.

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Honest Men Lying Abroad, Eloise Davies, London Book Review 19 JULY 2019

https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2019/july/honest-men-lying-abroad

Very interesting short article about Sir Henry Wotton. Includes his epitaph on his grave at Eton which is worth reading.

Curious to know more?

image.png.b627bbd84b34bea5b13abccc240049e6.png

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/The_life_and_letters_of_Sir_Henry_Wotton_(IA_lifelettersofsir01smitiala).pdf

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Thanks for sharing that link. I’ve just skip read through it all. You can see why he became a Shakespeare candidate.  Fascinating.
 

What strikes me is, are there no letters bemoaning the passing of Shakespeare in 1616? Has anyone ever heard of any, anywhere. 
 

I had no idea Wotton was Provost of Eton. Interesting to see it spelt as Eaton too.  
 

This is another strange link to my life which seems to have followed this band of men (Dudley, Dee, Bacon and now Wotton) around, because my daughter went to Eton College. It was her first pre-school.  A school within the college set up for the children (hence male and female) of the Masters. They offered a few places for those in the area who were not children of the ‘Beaks’. I never knew Bacon had wanted to be Provost. This is the first I’ve read of it in here.

Eric, I also noticed this reference to Thomas Wentworth - remember the picture of him in the Droeshout ruff.IMG_4088.jpeg.11e378e8f97dcc927b37777cfce9b047.jpeg

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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Just in case anyone lands on this thread in future years. The discussion about Henry Wotton continues/continued at length on another part of the forum - (Rob can you add the link - not sure how to do it, thanks). 
 

While I’m here, through some synchronicity I just landed on this page, selling this book. Wasn’t searching for him!IMG_4168.jpeg.2cae49c389576b02f730b6e8d13fc1b9.jpeg

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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FRANCIS BACON, EDWARD BLOUNT PUBLISHER OF THE SHAKESPEARE FIRST FOLIO, THE PRINTER JOHN BILL, SIR HENRY WOTTON AND THE ROSICRUCIAN -FREEMASONRY BROTHERHOOD 

During the time leading up to the printing and publishing of the Shakespeare First Folio its publisher Edward Blount was moving in the same Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic circles of many of the above as the planning and preparation for it was set in motion by Bacon with the help of Dr Rawley, Ben Jonson and George Herbert. During this period his close friend John Selden was supplying Bacon with manuscript materials for The History of Henry the Seventh filling the gap for the only reign not covered by Bacon in his Shakespeare history plays from Richard II to Henry VIII.1

   In the first of five surviving letters written between 15 June 1621 and 9 May 1623 to William Trumbull, English agent in Brussels, Blount answers a series of questions from Trumbull previously asked in a letter no longer extant. Blount begins by asking Trumbull about an unnamed manuscript he had loaned to Trumbull to read or copy ‘Worthy Sir Yours of 31 May received, for which I am much bound to you. Concerning that manuscript I sent you’. He tells him that he would now like it returned by some trusty messenger, because he had promised one or two friends the reading of it.2 In the letter Blount refers to two meetings ‘att master Bill’s howse, where by the neereness of freindship, I was allowed to come my self and to bring .2. or 3. of my freinds’.3 This was John Bill the London publisher who published numerous editions of Bacon’s works. During this period Bacon must have been a regular visitor to John Bill’s house no doubt where he often shared the company of Blount. In 1617 and 1618 Bill published three editions of Italian translations of Bacon’s Essays, an edition of a French translation of the Essays in 1619, Bacon’s Latin De Sapientia veterum (The Wisdom of the Ancients) in 1617, Novum Organum in 1620, and two English editions of The Wisdome Of The Ancients in 1619 and 1622.4

1. Francis Bacon, The Historie Of The Raigne Of King Henry The Seventh. Written By the Right Honourable, Francis, Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Alban (London: printed by William Stansby for Matthew Lownes and William Barret, 1622).

2. Ben Higgins, Shakespeare’s Syndicate: The First Folio, its Publishers, and the Early Modern Book Trade (Oxford University Press, 2022), p. 226. 

3. Ibid., p. 227. 

4. Gibson, nos., 33, 34, 35, 45, 94, 95, 96, 103a&b.
 

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4 hours ago, Kate said:

Just in case anyone lands on this thread in future years. The discussion about Henry Wotton continues/continued at length on another part of the forum - (Rob can you add the link - not sure how to do it, thanks). 
 

While I’m here, through some synchronicity I just landed on this page, selling this book. Wasn’t searching for him!IMG_4168.jpeg.2cae49c389576b02f730b6e8d13fc1b9.jpeg

Page 12: http://archiv.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/artdok/1870/1/Davis_Fontes68.pdf


RUDOLF WITTKOWER, “English Literature on Architecture”, in: Wittkower, Palladio and
English Palladianism, London: Thames and Hudson, 1974, p. 99:

(...) over half a century later, in 1624, Sir Henry Wotton published his equally remarkable
Elements of Architecture. One of the most cultured men of his day, Wotton had spent many
years abroad and ten of them as English ambassador in Venice. He had an impressive
knowledge of a wide range of sources, classical and modern, and handled them with great
ability. His critical analytical method probably stems from his early friendship with Francis
Bacon; his architectural terms of reference from Vitruvius; his concept of the architect as ‘a
diver into causes and into the mysteries of proportion’ from Alberti, and so forth.
All this is,
however, subordinated to the guiding thought of the moral influence exercised by
architecture. This treatise addresses itself not so much to professionals as to the dilettanti and
virtuosi of the refined society of the court of James I and Charles I. Wotton’s work was never
forgotten: it was reprinted and incorporated into other publications no less than sixteen times
until 1750.”

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4 hours ago, Kate said:

Just in case anyone lands on this thread in future years. The discussion about Henry Wotton continues/continued at length on another part of the forum - (Rob can you add the link - not sure how to do it, thanks). 
 

While I’m here, through some synchronicity I just landed on this page, selling this book. Wasn’t searching for him!IMG_4168.jpeg.2cae49c389576b02f730b6e8d13fc1b9.jpeg

https://archive.org/details/architectureelem00wott/page/n1/mode/2up

The elements of architecture, 1624 by Henry Wotton, 1568-1639

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Sorry, I confused matters. I meant a link to where the longer discussion on Wotton continues.

So I looked and it’s page 4 of this thread. We’ve got two active threads on Wotton, and it’s a bit confusing. I have something else to post but I’ll head over there to do it. 

IMG_4181.jpeg.2e48e2fb4a4b7a286cc77ae0e6b5638a.jpeg

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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Received my new old book today in the mail:

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Oh the smell of a 338 year old book! Smells like my other 300-400 year old books. There is a distinct aroma, an ancient flavor, maybe it is a living mold that was alive when the book was brand new.

It appears to me this book has never been read cover to cover. I've probably done more wear and tear on this book in an hour than the past 300 years!

At some point in this book's history, someone was interested in Pages 204 and 205; A VIEW OF THE LIFE AND DEATH OF GEORGE VILLIERS, DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM as that falls open. Now page 157 falls open. Ooops, or well. The book is an investment but also something I want to look at for "clues." LOL

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