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Sir Henry Wotton and Francis Bacon; Rosicrucians?


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A respected Baconian reached out to SirBacon.org about an incorrect name attributed to Bacon's Epitaph. For too many years "Thomas Wooton" took the title. However, as it was accurately pointed out, it was "Henry Wotton."

Henry Wotton wrote the epitaph on Bacon's monument at St. Michael's Church, St. Albans (Aubrey, Lives, i. 493).

Being me, I wanted to do some due diligence to be sure before I change anything. All I was looking for was validation the change request was correct. But I stumbled on more. But one little thing popped up I want to share.

Poem called "De Morte" possibly by Bacon:

https://allpoetry.com/De-Morte

image.png.3e58c257823d27d70dcf14c3e33e6c1e.png

Do the first letters of the lines add up to anything interesting?

image.png.42108fdb154c03127b68ae558a78160e.png

 

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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23 minutes ago, Kate said:

That’s really interesting re the 287, and I do see the All the World's a stage link, but I secretly rather hope it’s not Bacon as it’s incredibly clunky. Doesn’t have that beautiful Shakespearean flow, imo. 

So far I have not found any kind of facsimile or image of this poem. That would offer a few more clues or not. I am not sure why it is suggested that Bacon wrote it. The 157 and 287 are not something many people would have known.

Bacon and Wotton seemed to be friends. So yet another Treasure to seek, for someone.

De Morte is not a "Happy" poem, but if you spend time in the Sonnets you would see and feel the same emotions. Bacon's Deep pain and agony is very real and powerful. I suspect it all started from his Mother's womb. If Bacon wrote De Morte, I wonder how he old he was when he did. Maybe older than when he "died" in 1626?

The first two letters in the parenthesis are "Fr" hinting that he entered the world from his Mother's womb as Francis? The first cry is "th'ensuing Tragedy" (INSVING.SONNETS)?

Mans life's a Tragedy: his mothers womb
(From which he enters) is the tyring room;
This spacious earth the Theater; and the Stage
That Country which he lives in: Passions, Rage,
Folly, and Vice are Actors: The first cry
The Prologue to th'ensuing Tragedy.
The former act consisteth of dumb shows;
The second, he to more perfection grows;
I'th third he is a man, and doth begin
To nurture vice, and act the deeds of sin:
I'th fourth declines; i'th fifth diseases clog
And trouble him; then Death's his Epilogue.

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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I noticed the word "INCOMPARABLE" and after spending some time yesterday ith "INCOMPARABLE BRETHREN" in the forefront of my mind I had to buy it.

Don't tell my wife please! I'll need to come up with a logical reason why I spent the money... 😉

I can't wait to poke around! Wotton sounds interesting so far. 🙂

image.png.16dc207dceedc4493d093aaf8dc7575e.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

So far I have not found any kind of facsimile or image of this poem. That would offer a few more clues or not. I am not sure why it is suggested that Bacon wrote it. The 157 and 287 are not something many people would have known.

Bacon and Wotton seemed to be friends. So yet another Treasure to seek, for someone.

De Morte is not a "Happy" poem, but if you spend time in the Sonnets you would see and feel the same emotions. Bacon's Deep pain and agony is very real and powerful. I suspect it all started from his Mother's womb. If Bacon wrote De Morte, I wonder how he old he was when he did. Maybe older than when he "died" in 1626?

The first two letters in the parenthesis are "Fr" hinting that he entered the world from his Mother's womb as Francis? The first cry is "th'ensuing Tragedy" (INSVING.SONNETS)?

Mans life's a Tragedy: his mothers womb
(From which he enters) is the tyring room;
This spacious earth the Theater; and the Stage
That Country which he lives in: Passions, Rage,
Folly, and Vice are Actors: The first cry
The Prologue to th'ensuing Tragedy.
The former act consisteth of dumb shows;
The second, he to more perfection grows;
I'th third he is a man, and doth begin
To nurture vice, and act the deeds of sin:
I'th fourth declines; i'th fifth diseases clog
And trouble him; then Death's his Epilogue.

The ultimate poem! What else is there to say? 

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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

The ultimate poem! What else is there to say? 

"...then Death's his Epilogue"

This is the 6th "Tyring" room in the poem? In the Sonnets we pass beyond the 6th "Tyre" and enter Day 157.

I always thought this was the "First" death in the Sonnets. Day 157 is the Rebirth.

EDIT:

For what its worth, IGNOTO is 74 Reverse cipher which is the Simple cipher of both WILLIAM and TUDOR.

EDIT AGAIN: (Everybody across the ocean is asleep...) 🙂

Sonnet 66, which ends of the 6th Tier prior to entering Day 157 with the 7th Tier...

TYr'd with all these for restfull death I cry,
As to behold desert a begger borne,
And needie Nothing trimd in iollitie,
And purest faith vnhappily forsworne,
And gilded honor shamefully misplast,
And maiden vertue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgrac'd,
And strength by limping sway disabled ,
And arte made tung-tide by authoritie,
And Folly (Doctor-like) controuling skill,
And simple-Truth miscalde Simplicitie,
And captiue-good attending Captaine ill.

Tyr'd with all these,from these would I be gone,
Saue that to dye,I leaue my loue alone.

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

This is very interesting! First the Bubble then the De Morte?

https://sirbacon.org/archives/baconiana/1913_ Baconiana_No 41 - 44.pdf

image.png.70d62f1ac2876e9dc9eaed70ed3b9b9a.png

 

Hi Rob. You probably already found this transcription of "Reliquiae Wottonanae". The anonymous (Bacon) poem is exactly where Ms Leith said it was, straight after Bacon's poem:

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A67127.0001.001/1:48.7?rgn=div2;view=fulltext

 

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7 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Rob. You probably already found this transcription of "Reliquiae Wottonanae". The anonymous (Bacon) poem is exactly where Ms Leith said it was, straight after Bacon's poem:

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A67127.0001.001/1:48.7?rgn=div2;view=fulltext

 

Thanks for that, I did not already find! 🙂

 

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16 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

image.png.47f8a3072663bab6dd50f2be5f23e351.png

If this wonderful poem is by Lord Bacon which it seems to be, am I right in thinking that he is using the analogy of tyring a wheel to poetically describe our formation in our mother's womb? Bound by an iron circumference (time?). Here's a short video of tyring a wheel: 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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37 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

If this wonderful poem is by Lord Bacon which it seems to be, am I right in thinking that he is using the analogy of tyring a wheel to poetically describe our formation in our mother's womb? Bound by an iron circumference (time?).

I realize how little I know about PERICLES, PRINCE OF TYRE.

EDIT:

Also realizing how much I forget about Hiram of Tyre. "Of course Hiram Abiff of Tyre comes up. Bacon himself. The Son of the Widow."

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I realize how little I know about PERICLES, PRINCE OF TYRE.

EDIT:

Also realizing how much I forget about Hiram of Tyre. "Of course Hiram Abiff of Tyre comes up. Bacon himself. The Son of the Widow."

From LETTERS TO Sir EDMUND BACON, Reliquiae Wottonianae, or, A collection of lives, letters, poems with characters of sundry personages : and other incomparable pieces of language and art : also additional letters to several persons, not before printed

Wotton, Henry, Sir, 1568-1639. Page 403:

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A67127.0001.001/1:49?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

Your faithfullest to serve you, H. WOTTON.

"Francesco (not my italics) hath made a proof of that Green which you sent me; against which he taketh this excepti∣on, That being tryed upon Glass, (which he e∣steemeth the best of tryals) it is not translucent; arguing (as he saith) too much density of the matter, and consequently, less quickness and spirit then in colours of more tenuity."

Could this letter be referring to SFB - ?

There is also this letter to Wotton from Lord B.

image.png.05b04c64c9a7afbf2891e709e1c9491a.png

"Ure" seems to be an old spelling of "ore", unless anyone has any better ideas?

image.png.01b7fc9ed2e79fc53b09eaa3de411765.png

Anyway, clearly Francis Bacon is telling Wotton that he has sent him something - a manuscript perhaps? - from which valuable matter may be extracted.

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3 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

From LETTERS TO Sir EDMUND BACON, Reliquiae Wottonianae, or, A collection of lives, letters, poems with characters of sundry personages : and other incomparable pieces of language and art : also additional letters to several persons, not before printed

Wotton, Henry, Sir, 1568-1639. Page 403:

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A67127.0001.001/1:49?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

Your faithfullest to serve you, H. WOTTON.

"Francesco (not my italics) hath made a proof of that Green which you sent me; against which he taketh this excepti∣on, That being tryed upon Glass, (which he e∣steemeth the best of tryals) it is not translucent; arguing (as he saith) too much density of the matter, and consequently, less quickness and spirit then in colours of more tenuity."

Could this letter be referring to SFB - ?

There is also this letter to Wotton from Lord B.

image.png.05b04c64c9a7afbf2891e709e1c9491a.png

"Ure" seems to be an old spelling of "ore", unless anyone has any better ideas?

image.png.01b7fc9ed2e79fc53b09eaa3de411765.png

Anyway, clearly Francis Bacon is telling Wotton that he has sent him something - a manuscript perhaps? - from which valuable matter may be extracted.

 

Here is a list of 273 titles by or about Francis Bacon:

https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo?type=simple&rgn=full+text&q1=francis+bacon&cite1=&cite1restrict=author&cite2=&cite2restrict=author&singlegenre=All&firstpubl1=1470&firstpubl2=1700&Submit=Search

One little gem from this list of texts records Bacon's speech on his receiving the Great Seal of England in 1617. It shows him at his most formal and ceremonial, with legal precision and great eloquence, all with such humility and commitment.

image.png.e022167ba303b8d5c29881982933e46f.png

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Not convinced. 
This is great.
IMG_4064.jpeg.3e65330ed92c33e4bcd78f17aedd847b.jpeg

The other is good, but imo just seems different in flow and why would he talk about the seven ages of man but now truncate it to six? A great find to debate. 

Found this too

IMG_4066.jpeg.f01650d9e3ff44568653f2278ff04ed6.jpeg

 

This group is claiming Wotton to be Shakespeare.

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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7 minutes ago, Kate said:

Not convinced. 
This is great.
IMG_4064.jpeg.3e65330ed92c33e4bcd78f17aedd847b.jpeg

The other is good, but imo just seems different in flow and why would he talk about the seven ages of man but now truncate it to six? A great find to debate. 

Found this too

IMG_4066.jpeg.f01650d9e3ff44568653f2278ff04ed6.jpeg

 

This group is claiming Wotton to be Shakespeare.

Not another one?!

 

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A Brief Synopsis of the Relationship Between Sir Francis Bacon and Sir Henry Wotton

On his return to England in 1595 Wotton was admitted to the Middle Temple but never called to the Bar. By the middle of the year he was moving in the Bacon-Essex circles centred in and around Essex House the headquarters of the English Secret Service run by Francis and Anthony Bacon. He was a private secretary, cousin and confidante of Francis Bacon and worked as an intelligencer of the English Secret Service and was a member of Bacon’s Rosicrucian brotherhood. From the reign of King James I, Wotton was engaged in diplomatic service at Venice for twenty years albeit not continuously. His first embassy lasted from 1604-12 his second from 1616-19 with his final term from 1621-3. During his stay at Vienna, Wotton received a letter from Francis Bacon accompanied by three copies of his Novum Organum which he hoped through the good offices of his cousin would be able to draw attention to the book from the learned of Europe, serving in the capacity not unlike a Merchant of Light in Bacon’s New Atlantis (or, Land of the Rosicrucians).

The son of Sir Nicholas Bacon (1540-1624; elder brother of Lord Bacon) Sir Edmund Bacon (1570-1649) married Philippa the  niece of Sir Henry Wotton. A large number of letters were collected and issued under the title Letters of Sir Henry Wotton to Sir Edmund Bacon in 1661.  

Following the supposed death of Francis Bacon in 1626 his secretary Sir Thomas Meautys erected a monument of his Rosicrucian Master in the chapel of St Michaels’s Church in St Albans. An inscription is fittingly carried out by his cousin, friend and confidante Sir Henry Wotton who had secretly worked with Lord Bacon for the last thirty years of his known life. The Latin inscription incorporates a Bacon-Rosicrucian cipher confirming that Sir Henry Wotton was a member of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood.

In 1651 there appeared the first edition of Reliquiae Wottonianae. In this first edition of his collected works appears the poem entitled ‘The World is a bubble’ signed by Ignoto. In the second edition issued in 1654 the same poem appears but this time signed by ‘Fra. Ld. Bacon’ and thereafter in the 1672 and 1685 editions it is signed ‘Fra. Lord Bacon’.

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