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Mark Twain was a Baconian


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As you, no doubt, already know. But I've been doing some research into Twain and was a little surprised to find an entire mini-book he wrote on the subject! "If I were required to super-intend a Bacon-Shakespeare controversy, I would narrow the matter down to a single question--the only one, so far as the previous controversies have informed me, concerning which illustrious experts of unimpeachable competency have testified: WAS THE AUTHOR OF SHAKESPEARE'S WORKS A LAWYER?"

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23 minutes ago, Stephanie McPeak Petersen said:

As you, no doubt, already know. But I've been doing some research into Twain and was a little surprised to find an entire mini-book he wrote on the subject! "If I were required to super-intend a Bacon-Shakespeare controversy, I would narrow the matter down to a single question--the only one, so far as the previous controversies have informed me, concerning which illustrious experts of unimpeachable competency have testified: WAS THE AUTHOR OF SHAKESPEARE'S WORKS A LAWYER?"

Mark Twain is one of my favorite American authors! "Is Shakespeare Dead?" is my most favorite of his!

🙂

CHAPTER I

Scattered here and there through the stacks of unpublished manuscript which constitute this formidable Autobiography and Diary of mine, certain chapters will in some distant future be found which deal with “Claimants”—claimants historically notorious: Satan, Claimant; the Golden Calf, Claimant; the Veiled Prophet of Khorassan, Claimant; Louis XVII., Claimant; William Shakespeare, Claimant; Arthur Orton, Claimant; Mary Baker G. Eddy, Claimant—and the rest of them.  Eminent Claimants, successful Claimants, defeated Claimants, royal Claimants, pleb Claimants, showy Claimants, shabby Claimants, revered Claimants, despised Claimants, twinkle starlike here and there and yonder through the mists of history and legend and tradition—and oh, all the darling tribe are clothed in mystery and romance, and we read about them with deep interest and discuss them with loving sympathy or with rancorous resentment, according to which side we hitch ourselves to.  It has always been so with the human race.  There was never a Claimant that couldn’t get a hearing, nor one that couldn’t accumulate a rapturous following, no matter how flimsy and apparently unauthentic his claim might be.  Arthur Orton’s claim that he was the lost Tichborne baronet come to life again was as flimsy as Mrs. Eddy’s that she wrote Science and Health from the direct dictation of the Deity; yet in England near forty years ago Orton had a huge army of devotees and incorrigible adherents, many of whom remained stubbornly unconvinced after their fat god had been proven an impostor and jailed as a perjurer, and to-day Mrs. Eddy’s following is not only immense, but is daily augmenting in numbers and enthusiasm.  Orton had many fine and educated minds among his adherents, Mrs. Eddy has had the like among hers from the beginning.  Her church is as well equipped in those particulars as is any other church.  Claimants can always count upon a following, it doesn’t matter who they are, nor what they claim, nor whether they come with documents or without.  It was always so.  Down out of the long-vanished past, across the abyss of the ages, if you listen you can still hear the believing multitudes shouting for Perkin Warbeck and Lambert Simnel.

A friend has sent me a new book, from England—The Shakespeare Problem Restated—well restated and closely reasoned; and my fifty years’ interest in that matter—asleep for the last three years—is excited once more.

I could read this a million times and never be bored.

Here is a YouTube video I have watched almost a million times and adore every single time:

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
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Of course, I love Twain's contribution to the authorship question, but I'm afraid I'm not as enamored of him as many others are. I've been researching him from a different angle (his views on monetary theory) and found him advocating inflation in his very off-hand, humorous, can-we-take-him-seriously? way. It's a winding trail: I've been lately interested Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum and its alchemical positions that can be applied to a much later discovery of a gold telluride called SYLVAnite. There's another gold telluride called calaverite, named for Calaveras County, which leads my ADD-prone brain to Mark Twain. But I'm finding that Bacon's views on monetary theory are pretty much opposite those of Twain.

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