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Hello all!

Does anyone know of a good, in-depth article that tackles A Midsummer Night's Dream from a Baconian perspective? Very soon, I will have the opportunity to see it performed live by professional "Shakespearian" actors in a beautiful venue. All replies are greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

M. Haines

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Here is a Mather Walker essay:

https://sirbacon.org/mnd.htm

In A Midsummer Night's Dream you have Theseus, the mythological hero who has somehow became transformed into a duke; Hippolyta the Amazon queen who is ready to marry the big lug as soon as four nights "quickly dream away the time"; mismatched lovers; a wood with a summer night and the full moon shining brightly, which is certainly rather magical since we have just been told the day before that, that the time of month is the new moon, and that it will be four days before the "silver bow" of the moon, "new-bent" will appear in the heaven; a fairy King; a fairy Queen who falls in love with a low born lout with the head of a jackass; a handful of fairies; some clownlike "mechanicals"; four lovers who go to sleep one night and when they wake up the next morning it is three days later; and a dream where strange things happen.

What does it all mean? It means Francis Bacon is up to his old tricks again. He has constructed a magical story on the surface, of fairies, and moonlite nights, with the, by now, familiar two faces underneath. One face looks toward the past, and deals with ancient cosmology, while one looks toward the future and demonstrates the operation of his discovery device in inquiring into a related aspect of knowledge. 

Read more...>

 

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11 hours ago, Marvin Haines said:

Hello all!

Does anyone know of a good, in-depth article that tackles A Midsummer Night's Dream from a Baconian perspective? Very soon, I will have the opportunity to see it performed live by professional "Shakespearian" actors in a beautiful venue. All replies are greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

M. Haines

Hi Marvin. It's great that you're going to see A Midsummer Night's Dream live on stage. I've only seen the Helen Mirren (as Titania) version on DVD. The play is both allusive and elusive, working on several levels at once. Strange that the Baconiana Index only has one article on the play, mainly to do with ciphers. Perhaps A. Phoenix knows of an article or book that traces Bacon's hand in the Dream? I could only find a chapter on the play in a book by Wigston. See pages 129-139. It's rather esoteric, but it may give you some insights into Francis Bacon's mind.

COLUMBUS OF LITERATURE - WIGSTON.pdf

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

There is a work by a little known Baconian named John Gardiner who published two works a decade ago both of which were entitled He Sits 'Mongst Men Like a Descended God (Copyright John Gardiner, 2014). This 2014 edition contains a very long and interesting (If at times digressive) chapter on A Midsummer Night's Dream (pp. 3-104).  

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John Gardiner never made it into Baconiana? That is based on a SirBacon.org search where the only reference on SirBacon is by you, A. Phoenix:

https://sirbacon.org/FRANCIS BACON AND HIS EARLIEST SHAKESPEARE PLAY HAMLET A TUDOR FAMILY TRAGEDY.pdf

image.png.22b399ca9519221d1e9e447b5aa00fa0.png

Footnote:

image.png.4325501a1aee7aed15a3842d6599c0cc.png

You are a valuable source that discovers, recognizes, and shares the thinly placed, "captaine Iewells in the carconet."

😉

 

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If you, Yann (Allisnum2er), have time to stop in, here is a teaser in your style. 🙂

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/782/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.5b31b8487a2b2184d827776802af57ee.png

A new topic, for me, "Robin". 🙂

"He's Gone", a song that is one in my life by an old Rock-n-Roll band, the Gaterful Dead. A few lyrics:

He's gone, now he's gone, Lord he's gone, he's gone
Like a steam locomotive, rollin' down the track
He's gone, he's gone and nothin's gonna bring him back, he's gone
Like a steam locomotive, rollin' down the track
He's gone, he's gone and nothin's gonna bring him back, he's gone
 
Here is what Bacon said as Shakespeare above:
 
He is gone, he is gone, and we cast away mone,
Gramercy on his Soule.
 
 
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9 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

There is a work by a little known Baconian named John Gardiner who published two works a decade ago both of which were entitled He Sits 'Mongst Men Like a Descended God (Copyright John Gardiner, 2014). This 2014 edition contains a very long and interesting (If at times digressive) chapter on A Midsummer Night's Dream (pp. 3-104).  

Hi Marvin. There might not be enough time before the performance you're attending of A Midsummer Night's Dream, but the book that A Phoenix referred to is available from Barnes and Noble for a mere $15 (postage free). https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/he-sits-mongst-men-like-a-descended-god-john-gardiner/1119915417

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22 hours ago, Marvin Haines said:

Very soon, I will have the opportunity to see it performed live by professional "Shakespearian" actors in a beautiful venue.

Try to forget everything you think you know and enjoy. I wish I could see the play with virgin eyes!

Please share with us after you integrate it all. 🙂

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

The play was a riot!

I brought along a picture of SFB with the quote "Truth is so hard to tell, it sometimes needs fiction to make it plausible" printed in large letters on the reverse side. During the intermission, I approached a number of carefully chosen individuals and asked each of them who the man in the picture was. The answers were as varied as the subjects of my little experiment. Here are just a few:

"I dunno - some old guy, I guess."

"A man with a beard and a hat."

"It's good old Bill!"

"That's William Shakespeare, isn't it?"

I will admit I was frustrated by the last answer. I replied, "Yes, it is indeed Shakespeare!" 

When I got "I dunno" for a second time, the culprit being a middle-aged man in a T-shirt, I lost all my dignity and said, "The image that I'm holding is of Sir Francis Bacon, the true author of the Shakespearian Works."

He gave me a nasty look and said, "I have no time for that nonsense!"

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