Jump to content

The Zodiacus Vitae of Marcellus Palingenius Stellatus


Kate

Recommended Posts

Hi

Not sure if this has been looked at before, but I stumbled across it and thought someone may like to see if it contains anything interesting re the Shakespeare authorship question/Bacon/Good pens. I was struck by these words from inside:

“I have pointed out a few similarities of expression between Palingenius and Shakespeare”

“...the book was issued by the Stationers' Company in 1616, and that on March 5, 1620, the Zodiacus Vitae of Palingenius had become part of the English stock of the Company.”

“a recent anonymous Enghsh translator of the book suggests that there may be a concealed sense beneath the letter of these twelve books,”

"It satisfies our vanity to believe in immortality. " But when once our life has faded into thin air, we are nothing, as if we had not been born . . . whatsoever things have arisen fall : what things have begun will see an end. Mighty cities and peoples, powerful realms, the highest mountains and the greatest rivers, time bears away, and shalt thou, vilest of dust, exist for ever ? So great is the confidence of an ill-equipped mind. Forsooth, we labour in vain in the love of virtue, by hoping dreams and by inventing vain chimaeras.

The book goes on to say: This passage calls to mind Shakespeare's Tempest :

"The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve. And, like this insubstantial pageant faded. Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep."

Lots more references to Shakespeare and the fact that the author is a pseudonym inside.

https://archive.org/details/zodiacusvitaeofm00wats

More info https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pier_Angelo_ManzolliZodiacusVitae.png.4f8a0e0e7977a5d4f5f4dfb9edb867b3.png

Edited by Kate
Added Manzolli link
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Kate said:

Hi

Not sure if this has been looked at before, but I stumbled across it and thought someone may like to see if it contains anything interesting re the Shakespeare authorship question/Bacon/Good pens. I was struck by these words from inside:

“I have pointed out a few similarities of expression between Palingenius and Shakespeare”

“...the book was issued by the Stationers' Company in 1616, and that on March 5, 1620, the Zodiacus Vitae of Palingenius had become part of the English stock of the Company.”

“a recent anonymous Enghsh translator of the book suggests that there may be a concealed sense beneath the letter of these twelve books,”

"It satisfies our vanity to believe in immortality. " But when once our life has faded into thin air, we are nothing, as if we had not been born . . . whatsoever things have arisen fall : what things have begun will see an end. Mighty cities and peoples, powerful realms, the highest mountains and the greatest rivers, time bears away, and shalt thou, vilest of dust, exist for ever ? So great is the confidence of an ill-equipped mind. Forsooth, we labour in vain in the love of virtue, by hoping dreams and by inventing vain chimaeras.

The book goes on to say: This passage calls to mind Shakespeare's Tempest :

"The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces, The solemn temples, the great globe itself, Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve. And, like this insubstantial pageant faded. Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep."

Lots more references to Shakespeare and the fact that the author is a pseudonym inside.

https://archive.org/details/zodiacusvitaeofm00wats

More info https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pier_Angelo_ManzolliZodiacusVitae.png.4f8a0e0e7977a5d4f5f4dfb9edb867b3.png

Thanks, Kate, for this intriguing find...

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...