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The Unrecognized Cambridge Manuscript written by the 12 year old Francis Bacon & the Taming of the Shrew


A Phoenix

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Then as we were approaching the new millennium matters took another very curious turn. In the most widely read modern edition of The Complete Works of Shakespeare its editors Professor Stanley Wells, honorary President of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, honorary Emeritus Governor of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies of the University of Birmingham, honorary Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford and of University College, London and widely billed as the world’s most foremost expert on Shakespeare and his co-editor Professor Gary Taylor actually put names to Petruccio’s servants:

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Yet remarkably in only naming these four servants they very deliberately omitted the name of another, one when placed alongside one of those they did name, has enormous significance, a modus operandi, they repeated in the second edition of The Complete Works of Shakespeare published by arguably the most prestigious press in the world, the Oxford Clarendon: 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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It may have been worthwhile for our two trusted illustrious editors of the most widely printed and available modern edition of The Complete Works of Shakespeare to have consulted ‘The Characters Of The Play’ in the Oxford edition of The Taming of the Shrew (of which Professor Stanley Wells acted as General Editor) in which the name of the other servant is printed:

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Finally, nearly four hundred years after the publication of The Taming of the Shrew in the First Folio where the names of these servants were introduced Oliver followed by professors Bate and Rasmussen in the complete edition of the works for the RSC and Professor Barbara Hodgson in the latest Arden edition of The Taming of the Shrew are able to simply do the same: 

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Following the wedding of Petruccio and Katherine we meet these servants in Act 4 Scene I at Petruccio’s country house. His servant Grumio arrives at Petruccio’s house complaining how cold it is and prepares to light a fire as they and the other servants prepare for the arrival of their master and new mistress. Grumio instructs Curtis to make sure that the servants all look smart and are correctly adorned in their uniforms. When the newly wedded couple arrive Petruccio is angry his servants are not outside to meet him and immediately begins to insult and abuse them. He orders his servants to bring him supper and continues to act rudely and aggressively. He kicks one of the servants and rails at the others as he continues to verbally and physical abuse those around him, among them Nathaniel and Nicholas:

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

 

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Family Gathering

He we have in this scene a very special gathering of characters. The swaggering and ludicrous Peturuccio, modelled on the calligrapher and scribe Petruccio Ubaldini, who was commissioned by Sir Nicholas Bacon to produce the illustrated manuscript of the sententiae on the gallery walls at Gorhambury for Lady Lumely and commissioned by Lady Bacon to copy out in fine Italian script the Cultivated Cosmographical Garden composed by a young Francis Bacon prefaced by Greek and Latin verses from herself her other Cooke sisters, including her sister Katherine, refracted through the character of Katherine in The Taming of the Shrew. In the play where Katherine had a sister named Bianca, from which we can anagrammatically derive AN BAC, a contraction of Anne Bacon, the Christian name of whose son, Anthony Bacon, is used in the play for Petruccio’s father. And if all this was not enough, two of Petruccio’s servants are named Nicholas and Nathaniel the Christian names of Bacon’s elder half-brother Sir Nicholas and Sir Nathaniel Bacon, from Sir Nicholas Bacon’s first marriage, whose elite social standing as part of the self-important landed gentry is brilliantly subverted by our supreme poet presenting and portraying them as being from the lower classes depicted as lowly berated servants serving their master Petruccio at his country house.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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The Taming of the Shrew - A Bacon Family Affair

The radically altered version of the play revised and amended for the publication of the First Folio when virtually all those persons alluded to in play were dead (with the exception of the ill and dying Sir Nicholas Bacon Junior who died in 1624), was in part a hilarious practical family joke by a philosopher-poet who could never pass by a jest. Lampooning the Bacon family scribe Petruccio Ubaldini and his conceivably real or imagined designs on Katherine Cooke Killigrew, with the part of Bianca modelled on her sister Lady Anne Bacon, and Petruccio’s father given the name of Antonio after Anthony Bacon, two of whose servants had the same Christian names as his elder half-brothers Nicholas and Nathaniel Bacon. In the final analysis, The Taming of the Shrew is a Bacon family affair, written by the supreme family poet, Francis Bacon.     

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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6 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Following the wedding of Petruccio and Katherine we meet these servants in Act 4 Scene I at Petruccio’s country house. His servant Grumio arrives at Petruccio’s house complaining how cold it is and prepares to light a fire as they and the other servants prepare for the arrival of their master and new mistress. Grumio instructs Curtis to make sure that the servants all look smart and are correctly adorned in their uniforms. When the newly wedded couple arrive Petruccio is angry his servants are not outside to meet him and immediately begins to insult and abuse them. He orders his servants to bring him supper and continues to act rudely and aggressively. He kicks one of the servants and rails at the others as he continues to verbally and physical abuse those around him, among them Nathaniel and Nicholas:

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

 

CAMBRIDGE 57.png

Enthralling... I can't see where this is going but I'm enjoying getting there.

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7 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

In this scene, the language is so easy to understand. No pensive philosophy or classical references - rather, a matter-of-fact evocation of domestic servants in a flap prior to the arrival of their demanding master. 

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7 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Family Gathering

He we have in this scene a very special gathering of characters. The swaggering and ludicrous Peturuccio, modelled on the calligrapher and scribe Petruccio Ubaldini, who was commissioned by Sir Nicholas Bacon to produce the illustrated manuscript of the sententiae on the gallery walls at Gorhambury for Lady Lumely and commissioned by Lady Bacon to copy out in fine Italian script the Cultivated Cosmographical Garden composed by a young Francis Bacon prefaced by Greek and Latin verses from herself her other Cooke sisters, including her sister Katherine, refracted through the character of Katherine in The Taming of the Shrew. In the play where Katherine had a sister named Bianca, from which we can anagrammatically derive AN BAC, a contraction of Anne Bacon, the Christian name of whose son, Anthony Bacon, is used in the play for Petruccio’s father. And if all this was not enough, two of Petruccio’s servants are named Nicholas and Nathaniel the Christian names of Bacon’s elder half-brother Sir Nicholas and Sir Nathaniel Bacon, from Sir Nicholas Bacon’s first marriage, whose elite social standing as part of the self-important landed gentry is brilliantly subverted by our supreme poet presenting and portraying them as being from the lower classes depicted as lowly berated servants serving their master Petruccio at his country house.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

CAMBRIDGE 59.png

Hi A. Phoenix. Thanks for putting two and two together and naming Ubaldini as the calligrapher who designed Lady Lumley's book of the Gorhambury sententiae. Makes a lot of sense. You really are on the cutting edge of Baconian research.

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7 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The Taming of the Shrew - A Bacon Family Affair

The radically altered version of the play revised and amended for the publication of the First Folio when virtually all those persons alluded to in play were dead (with the exception of the ill and dying Sir Nicholas Bacon Junior who died in 1624), was in part a hilarious practical family joke by a philosopher-poet who could never pass by a jest. Lampooning the Bacon family scribe Petruccio Ubaldini and his conceivably real or imagined designs on Katherine Cooke Killigrew, with the part of Bianca modelled on her sister Lady Anne Bacon, and Petruccio’s father given the name of Antonio after Anthony Bacon, two of whose servants had the same Christian names as his elder half-brothers Nicholas and Nathaniel Bacon. In the final analysis, The Taming of the Shrew is a Bacon family affair, written by the supreme family poet, Francis Bacon.     

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

CAMBRIDGE 60.png

I only have the Burton-Taylor film to go on, but it's amazing how passionately alive the two central characters in the play are, and to think of SFB in his early sixties revising this work of his youth into a timeless tussle between male and female archetypes. Wow, indeed!

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