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The Unrecognized Cambridge Manuscript written by the 12 year old Francis Bacon & the Taming of the Shrew


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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

This is great Eric, thanks for posting! Don't recall ever seeing this so not sure where it's from ourselves. It also gives you a sense that there is not actually too much left today.¬†ūüíĒ

Hi A.P. - I remember now. The plan is from Manor and Houses of Gorhambury, Rogers, 1936 published by the St Albans and Hertfordshire Architectural and Archaeological Society, Nov. 2013.

Manor and Houses of Gorhambury, Rogers, 1936.pdf

 

 

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Bacon Patrons

The patronage of Petruccio Ulbaldini by Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Bacon during the previous decades was naturally inherited by Francis from the 1580 onwards during which time Ulbadini also benefited from another powerful patron, Bacon’s uncle Sir William Cecil. It was almost certainly through the agency of Cecil and Bacon that from 1581 Ubaldini began working closely with the printer and publisher John Wolf as a translator and consultant. And for the next decade Ubaldini worked with Wolfe on several important clandestine Italian works including those by Pietro Aretino and the notorious political philosopher Niccolo Machiavelli published with false imprints and fictitious places of publication for which Bacon wrote the Italian prefaces.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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In the midst of the last of the Italian Machiavelli editions proof-read by Ubaldini and printed by Wolfe, Bacon directed Wolfe to print the trilingual edition of The Courtier of Count Baldessar Castilio in 1588 which formats in parallel columns Castiglione’s original Italian, the French translation of Chapuis and the English translation by his uncle Sir Thomas Hoby assisted by his wife Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby, the younger sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon. Above the first page of this trilingual text stands Bacon’s enigmatic AA headpiece. The Courtier was drawn upon by Bacon for several of his later Shakespeare plays including the early The Taming of the Shrew written in c.1589-90, co-starring an Italian man with the name Petruccio the same Christian name of Petruccio Unbaldini and Katherine, the same Christian name of Bacon’s aunt Katherine Cooke Killigrew, the younger sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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The precise dating of The Taming of the Shrew is complicated by the existence of the anonymous play with the title The Taming of a Shrew. The exact relationship between the two plays is still hotly disputed with the main theories advocated by Shakespeare scholars given here below:

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Facsimiles of selected pages from "A Shrew":

https://www.bl.uk/collection-items/the-taming-of-a-shrew-1596

Conventional view of the two Shrews:

http://elizabethandrama.org/the-playwrights/anonymous-plays/the-taming-of-a-shrew/

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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While on the subject of The Taming of the Shrew, the transformation prank played on Christopher Sly has long intrigued me. The story of a random drunk being fooled into thinking he's suddenly become a lord is irresistibly hilarious. I wonder whether Francis in his more boisterous youth ever actually perpetrated such a "joke" on some poor, helpless nobody?

1265233202_ScreenShot2023-05-26at8_42_46pm.png.20756e52f98503ec239644ed403cc41b.png

https://www.bard.org/study-guides/shakespeare-on-the-sly/

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It is now widely assumed by modern Shakespeare scholars that a version of the play was written c.1589-90, with some scholars suggesting an even earlier date, and others opting for a range of dates from 1589 to 1594. The play was entered on the Stationers’ Register in May 1594 and anonymously published thereafter as A Pleasant Conceited Historie, called The taming of a Shrew. As it was sundry times acted by the Right honourable the Earle of Pembrook his seruants. Only one copy of this 1594 edition survives which is now held in Huntington Library, California. Both the anonymous The Taming of a Shrew and The Taming of the Shrew first printed in the First Folio were written by Shakespeare, i.e., Bacon. In his Advancement of Learning Bacon set out a series of the cipher systems which he later incorporated into his acknowledged writings and the Quarto and Folio editions of his Shakespeare plays.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi A.Phoenix

As you know, another difference between A Shrew and The Shrew is Christopher Sly's presence at the end of the former version (A Shrew):

image.png.fc4a6dfcf3ce13cf97276e1e6168002c.png

Whereas, The Shrew concludes with Petruccio and Kate going off to bed:

image.png.0ea522efe6095ad32350c7050a37413e.png

Any suggestions why Francis Bacon chose not to reintroduce Christopher Sly at the end of The Shrew? 

In Baconiana from 1911, I found an article by Alicia A Leith, Notes on the Taming of the Shrew, in which she quotes Wigston's suggestion that the prank played on Sly has much in common with Bacon's raising Shaxper to the status of "author".

image.png.6ecfa3602bc4c34add93243a6c54e67d.png

Baconiana, No. 36 Oct 1911 p.223-238

https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/1911_-Baconiana_No-33-36.pdf

image.jpeg.d1cb2e031be8123f0d41bdb42c32bca7.jpeg 

Contemporary portrait of the comedic actor, William Sly.

Credit: Dulwich Picture Gallery

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

Nothing immediately comes to mind as to why FB did not re-introduce Christopher Sly at the end ofThe Shrew, however where FB is concerned there is likely to be some kind of reason for doing so.

Certainly, many Baconians believe that Sly was an amusing send-up of Shakspere of Stratford thereby pointing to the fact that Willy was not the author of the Shakespeare plays.

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Hi everyone,

Here is something about "The Taming of the Shrew" that I shared last year in one of my videos (Sapere Aude -Part II).

In my view, the "weee'le" with three "e" is a clue, and here is what I found around him.

Is it just a coincidence or is it deliberate ? I leave you judge.

2023-05-27.png.6dc29d5c78837c77c05da4040a52245a.png

 

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Petruccio

Let us then start with a small clue for the orthodox Shakespeare schoolmen regarding the contemporary model for Petruccio in The Taming of the Shrew that requires not even a scintilla of academic prowess, intellectual subtlety or sophistication-Petruccio and Petruccio Ubaldini share the same name. And moreover to remove any reasonable uncertainty as to the possibility of any other contemporary candidates we can do no better than quote the words of the editor Professor Barbara Hodgson from the modern Bloomsbury Arden edition of The Taming of the Shrew (in which the name of Petruccio Ubaldini does not appear in its detailed thirteen page index):

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Petruccio & Bacon 

Understandably, even though there is an entry for him in the DNB and ODNB, the name of Petruccio Ubaldini remains virtually unknown to the non-specialist scholar or casual student but he has for centuries been known to Elizabethan historians and at least some Shakespeare editors, critics and commentators. So why the avoiding of any discussion of the contemporary figure Petruccio Ubaldini in relation to the central protagonist Petruccio in The Taming of the Shrew? Is it in some instances simple plain ignorance or in others deliberate systematic suppression? What can be said with some confidence is that when all the relevant information about Petruccio Ubaldini and his links and relationships with the Bacons, and in particular Francis Bacon, is presented in a single narrative (as it is here for the first time) it illuminates the true authorship of the Shakespeare play The Taming of the Shrew which is reinforced and confirmed by other evidence presented here.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Petruccio & Bacon 

Understandably, even though there is an entry for him in the DNB and ODNB, the name of Petruccio Ubaldini remains virtually unknown to the non-specialist scholar or casual student but he has for centuries been known to Elizabethan historians and at least some Shakespeare editors, critics and commentators. So why the avoiding of any discussion of the contemporary figure Petruccio Ubaldini in relation to the central protagonist Petruccio in The Taming of the Shrew? Is it in some instances simple plain ignorance or in others deliberate systematic suppression? What can be said with some confidence is that when all the relevant information about Petruccio Ubaldini and his links and relationships with the Bacons, and in particular Francis Bacon, is presented in a single narrative (as it is here for the first time) it illuminates the true authorship of the Shakespeare play The Taming of the Shrew which is reinforced and confirmed by other evidence presented here.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

CAMBRIDGE 48.png

https://sokol.co.uk/stock/ubaldini-petruccio/

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14 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

".. as a matter of fact, he says in the passage referred to that he has been in the service of Queen Elizabeth since 1563. What this service consisted in is not clear at all: since Ubaldini was no longer young enough to be a soldier, a modern critic writes that ‚Äėfrom 1562 onwards, he was able to fill the vacuum left by the rupture in official diplomatic and ecclesiastical contacts between England and Italy. He became almost the only well-placed Italian reporter of English affairs during the second half of the sixteenth century. ‚Ķ Ubaldini, .. corresponded with the secretaries of the Dukes of Florence and numbered Henrey Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel, Walsingham, William Cecil, Lord Thomas Howard and other important personages amongst his acquaintances. Certainly Queen Elizabeth thought his services were valuable enough to grant him a salary.‚Äô (Bugliani). .. Ubaldini is the author of 12 works, all of them composed and/or published in England between 1564 and 1597.‚ÄĚ

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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The Cooke Sisters

In addition to the principle plot of The Taming of the Shrew in which the shrewish Katherine is wooed, won and tamed by Petruccio there is an interconnected subplot involving Lucentio, Gremio and Hortensio, as rival suitors for the hand of Katherine’s sister named Bianca. The character of Katherine in the play shares the same Christian name with Katherine Cooke Killigrew. In real life Katherine Cooke Killigrew was the younger sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon and in the play the sister of Katherine is named Bianca. The name of Bianca may well have been adopted by Bacon for the purposes of an anagram as it yields I BACAN which is of course a near anagram of I BACON, or alternatively I AN BAC, which is a near anagram, or otherwise suggests, the name Anne Bacon.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Brother Anthony

In The Taming of the Shrew Bacon provides the character of Petruccio with a father whom he makes Petruccio refer to on three separate occasions. Our author can of course select any name he chooses from literally hundreds of different names. From this vast range of possibilities Bacon chooses the name Antonio, the Italian form of Anthony, the name of his beloved brother Anthony Bacon:

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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Dramatis Personae

There has also been a very curious pattern in the way the dramatis personae of The Taming of the Shrew has been presented down the centuries in both complete editions of the Shakespeare works and in single editions of the play. To illustrate this repeated practice I here below provide a number of representative examples covering a period of the last two hundred years (carried over from the first editions of the Shakespeare plays).

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/45576461/Francis_Bacons_Unrecognised_Cambridge_Manuscript_and_The_Taming_of_The_Shrew

Video: https://youtu.be/EXMUhRzrOxw

#TamingoftheShrew #Cambridge #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare

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