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Francis Bacon, the God-like Rosicrucian Figure of Duke Vincentio in Measure for Measure


A Phoenix

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5 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

This is someting that I already shared with you at least two times by the past.

Hey Yann, I wasn't trying to take anything away from your great work. I had been working on some lines A. Phoenix quoted that are on page 82 (or page 100 of the Folio).

But faults...
Stand...
As...

Then I saw page 81 and began working on that page a little.

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Exploring further I noticed a "hang" twice at the bottom of page 83 (or page 101):

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Then I went to the next page, aware it was page 84 and 102 and noticed the Francis Bacon at the very end. Perfect! Bacon was Hanging as always!

I realized the Francis Bacon must have been seen and mentioned by others before as it does stand out, and should have looked back at our 102 discussions. I did honestly not remember seeing your take on it, and I often don't even remember things I find and mention. But I figured with A. Phoenix connecting the Duke to Francis Bacon, it was a good time to post it and then I went to bed not doing more work on the other pages.

I wish I had looked back at 102 topics and reposted your work as it is more complete! 🙂

 

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41 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Hey Yann, I wasn't trying to take anything away from your great work. I had been working on some lines A. Phoenix quoted that are on page 82 (or page 100 of the Folio).

My apologies Rob !

As I said earlier, I realised that I have over-reacted. I know that it was not your intention.

I plan to see a Psychanalist ! 😄

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6 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

My apologies Rob !

As I said earlier, I realised that I have over-reacted. I know that it was not your intention.

I plan to see a Psychanalist ! 😄

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I was actually a little worried I might be spoiling a finale for A. Phoenix, but I looked towards the end of the academic paper and didn't see anything. I guess I had some intuition (or a memory just below the surface) it was known, and I did think about 102 being a possible topic. So I was close...

No need to apologize at all. And feel free to claim what is yours anytime I post something you have already done! 😉

"Come back, Conie!" LOL

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Studying page 84 (102 of the Folio).

Above in a reply I mention that "hang" appears twice at the end of the previous page. "Bacon" typically appears after we see "hang." Granted in this play "hang" is almost on every page!! And Bacon is always present. At the bottom of page 84 at just before FINIS we see Francis Bacon. This is a HUGE powerful signature. Bacon is the Duke.

I kind of read quickly through the first lines of the page last night, wanting to come back while looking for the hanging Bacon. Now taking my time, exploring, I am shocked at what I see. Read with me listening to Bacon's voice as the Duke. His strong eloquent voice as he says what is on his mind as this play was finished.

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The Duke, who is Bacon, speaking to his blood father, who has been a subject in recent threads.

Francis tells his daddy what he needs to do, and he did marry his mother, to save Bacon's honor to NOT be a bastard. Bacon forgives and remits him of "thy other forfeits", maybe even murdering his adopted father, Sir Nicholas Bacon.

"Take him to prison, and see our pleasure herein executed." Justice served.

LUC tells Bacon referring to his blood mother, Elizabeth;

Marrying a punke my Lord, is pressing to death, Whipping and hanging.

Maybe this is where the "hanging Bacon" all points to. For Bacon to suggest his mother who was a Queen to marry a punke to save his honor is worthy of Whipping and hanging?

Hanging is the Bacon part, "Whipping" may refer to him being born as "Will".

Whatever, the way Elizabeth slandered her Prince, she deserves it. Right?

Thank you Francis Bacon for being the Duke, and sharing your story. I get it, you tell a tale better than anybody ever has ever!

 

 

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This may be already familiar to you all. From William Stone Booth, Subtle Shining Secrecies (Boston: Walter H. Baker, 1925), p. 31: "The gallows, or to give it a French name the potence, is often used by Shake-speare, and, as will be seen, sometimes in connection with some use of the verb to hang. The famous hang-hog story here lends its point, and is told on page 67. The gallows acrostic device is so called because of its shape." This is his first example on p. 31, in his first section on "Technique":

That    T      S         hang

H          H     A        o

A          A     Turn   g

T        That

On p. 67, the first example he gives is from The Tempest and related to "hang hog." (which we also know from The Merry Wives of Windsor scene with Mistress Quickly). The story is short so seems worth repeating. He says, "The gallows form may be connected with the story reported by Francis Bacon himself as having occurred in a law court when his father Sir Nicholas Bacon had condemned one Hogge to be hanged. The prisoner pleaded with Sir Nicholas that Hogge and Bacon were ever kindred, and that the one should not condemn the other to death. 'Ah, but you forget," said Sir Nicholas, 'that before Hogge becomes good Bacon, it must be well hanged.'" 

Booth explains the pun on hang-hog has to do with the Latin word Suspendere, "to hang up, prop up, keep in suspense,"  broken into sus for pig and pendere which similarly means "to hang upon, depend upon, be in suspense, but it also can mean "to weigh, consider, judge, value," which is interesting since the anecdote concerns a judge's weighing and considering of a case. I'm thinking also of pennies and pence (from the participle form, pensus, pensum ("wool weighted out to a spinner; hence, pay for a day's work, task, duty"), perhaps, and penance. Cassell's Latin Dictionary, 1963 p.b., pendo; pendeo; sus, suis; suspendo.

If you get a chance to look at his book, Both's examples ##10-22 are all on The Tempest and lead off his section, "Devices in Comedies" (pp. 67-158).

On p. 32, he gives an example from Bacon's first edition of his Essays where his book appeared with no name on the title page, so he dedicated it to Anthony his brother, with a "marginal device" of the word "Origin" with "baconi" forming "crooked smoke" (as one smokes bacon) arising alongside it. (as an example "of a device on the initial indent). "Thus, had the Essays gone forth without a name on the dedication, we should nevertheless have had this device and several others of similar nature to inform us (See pp. 61-62)."

I think this is a book worth "weighing and considering," notwithstanding the Friedmans' put-down of Booth in their 1957 book.  He wrote other books on acrostics, but claims he put his best examples in Subtle Shining Secrecies Writ in the Margents of Books, Generally Ascribed to William Shakespeare, The Actor and Here Ascribed to William Shakespeare, The Poet.

Spedding calls the Nicholas Bacon apopthegm "spurious." (1:185)

Edited by Christie Waldman
found: https://sirbacon.org/links/dawkinsl&s.htm.
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4 hours ago, Christie Waldman said:

This may be already familiar to you all. From William Stone Booth, Subtle Shining Secrecies (Boston: Walter H. Baker, 1925), p. 31: "The gallows, or to give it a French name the potence, is often used by Shake-speare, and, as will be seen, sometimes in connection with some use of the verb to hang. The famous hang-hog story here lends its point, and is told on page 67. The gallows acrostic device is so called because of its shape." This is his first example on p. 31, in his first section on "Technique":

That    T      S         hang

H          H     A        o

A          A     Turn   g

T        That

On p. 67, the first example he gives is from The Tempest and related to "hang hog." (which we also know from The Merry Wives of Windsor scene with Mistress Quickly). The story is short so seems worth repeating. He says, "The gallows form may be connected with the story reported by Francis Bacon himself as having occurred in a law court when his father Sir Nicholas Bacon had condemned one Hogge to be hanged. The prisoner pleaded with Sir Nicholas that Hogge and Bacon were ever kindred, and that the one should not condemn the other to death. 'Ah, but you forget," said Sir Nicholas, 'that before Hogge becomes good Bacon, it must be well hanged.'" 

Booth explains the pun on hang-hog has to do with the Latin word Suspendere, "to hang up, prop up, keep in suspense,"  broken into sus for pig and pendere which similarly means "to hang upon, depend upon, be in suspense, but it also can mean "to weigh, consider, judge, value," which is interesting since the anecdote concerns a judge's weighing and considering of a case. I'm thinking also of pennies and pence (from the participle form, pensus, pensum ("wool weighted out to a spinner; hence, pay for a day's work, task, duty"), perhaps, and penance. Cassell's Latin Dictionary, 1963 p.b., pendo; pendeo; sus, suis; suspendo.

If you get a chance to look at his book, Both's examples ##10-22 are all on The Tempest and lead off his section, "Devices in Comedies" (pp. 67-158).

On p. 32, he gives an example from Bacon's first edition of his Essays where his book appeared with no name on the title page, so he dedicated it to Anthony his brother, with a "marginal device" of the word "Origin" with "baconi" forming "crooked smoke" (as one smokes bacon) arising alongside it. (as an example "of a device on the initial indent). "Thus, had the Essays gone forth without a name on the dedication, we should nevertheless have had this device and several others of similar nature to inform us (See pp. 61-62)."

I think this is a book worth "weighing and considering," notwithstanding the Friedmans' put-down of Booth in their 1957 book.  He wrote other books on acrostics, but claims he put his best examples in Subtle Shining Secrecies Writ in the Margents of Books, Generally Ascribed to William Shakespeare, The Actor and Here Ascribed to William Shakespeare, The Poet.

https://sirbacon.org/pattonstrs.htm

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

First Words

Acknowledgements

Dedications

PART I

§ 1 The Friedmans, Their Reputation and Their Book

§2 Press Notices

§ 3 William Stone Booth and His Books

§ 4 The Friedmans, the Stratfordians and Their Tactics

A Little Essay on Scholarship

A Little Latin Lesson

Francis Bacon’s Essay “Of Truth”

PART II

THE GREAT RESTORATION OF TRUTH

§1 Friedman’s “Foundation” Examined

§ 2 Booth’s Study of Sixteenth- and Seventeenth Century
Cryptography

§ 3 How Friedman Ignored Booth’s Instructions

§ 4 Booth’s Use of the Name “String Cipher”

§ 5 The Alternating Line String Cipher Method

§ 6 The Acrostics in the Epilogue of “The Tempest”

§ 7 The Acrostic in “The Colours of Good and Euill, a fragment”

§ 8 The Acrostic in “The Phœnix and the Turtle: Threnos”

§ 9 A Double Acrostic in All the Spoken Words in
All the First Lines of All the Plays in the 1623 Folio

§ 10 The Acrostics in Matthew Arnold’s “Merope”
and Ben Jonson’s

PART III

Subtle Shining Secrecies
Writ in the Margents of Books

Last Words

APPENDIX

Some Acrostic Signatures of Francis Bacon
Chapter IV
Chapter V

 

FIRST WORDS
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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Misnumbered page 277 - Francis Bacon (100) - WILLIAM SHAKSEPEARE (177)

Am I correct in thinking it should be page 257?

FRANCIS BACON (100) plus WILLIAM TUDOR I (157) = 257 Simple cipher.

Looking at that page now that starts with the spoken word, "Will"...

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26 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Am I correct in thinking it should be page 257?

FRANCIS BACON (100) plus WILLIAM TUDOR I (157) = 257 Simple cipher.

Looking at that page now that starts with the spoken word, "Will"...

Hi Rob,

In fact, it should be page 169  ! 🙂 

You have a first shift of 8 on the first page of Julius Caesar that should be  page 101 instead of page 109.

And you have a second shift of 100 on page 157 ( In reality page 149) that is numbered 257.

257 = 100 + 157 = FRANCIS BACON + WILLIAM TUDOR I 😉 

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11 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Rob,

In fact, it should be page 169  ! 🙂 

You have a first shift of 8 on the first page of Julius Caesar that should be  page 101 instead of page 109.

And you have a second shift of 100 on page 157 ( In reality page 149) that is numbered 257.

257 = 100 + 157 = FRANCIS BACON + WILLIAM TUDOR I 😉 

Thanks! I just clicked up and saw page number 259 when I expected 279, so figured 277 was 257. LOL

Looking at this page 259, I see BACON jumping to get my attention!!

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/787/index.html%3Fzoom=800.html

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