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Francis Bacon, the God-like Rosicrucian Figure of Duke Vincentio in Measure for Measure


A Phoenix

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Death of Sir Nicholas Bacon

Three days later his beloved foster father and mentor Lord Keeper and de facto Lord Chancellor of England Sir Nicholas Bacon died on 20 February 1579.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #MeasureForMeasure #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #ShakespeareAuthorship

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/49082994/Francis_Bacon_the_God_like_Rosicrucian_Figure_of_Duke_Vincentio_and_the_Unpublished_Speeches_of_Lord_Keeper_Sir_Nicholas_Bacon_in_Measure_for_Measure

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_w6qNlX_GE&t=19s

MEASURE FOR MEASURE 3.png

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi A. Phoenix. The soft frame effect works well with the image. More importantly, your dovetailing of events as you reveal the story is remarkable.

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On 4/2/2023 at 5:17 AM, A Phoenix said:

Please, what support do you offer for your rather outrageous opinion that "Dudley most likely poisoned Sir Nicholas Bacon"? What about the narrative that Sir Nicholas is said to have told that the  barber let him fall sleep in front of a window exposed to a cold draft, after which he took ill and died? Why do you not believe this story? Is it not perfectly plausible for an older man whose health was failing (overweight, gout) susceptible to catching cold which turned into something worse? What possible motive could Dudley have had in wanting to see Sir Nicholas dead so badly that he would poison and murder him? Was anyone suggesting this at the time? If so, whom? There was no inquest? On what are you basing this allegation? In general, evidence contrary to what one believes cannot simply be disregarded. It needs to be addressed, if one wishes to be taken seriously. People need to state reasons and sources in support of their opinions. If school children come to SirBacon.org in search of information, they ought to be able to find trustworthy information supported by facts, as is the standard.

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See:

A. Phoenix, 'Was the Very Mysterious Death of Sir Nicholas Bacon the Result of Poisoning', (2021), pp. 1-12. https://www.academia.edu/81741710/Was_the_Very_Mysterious_Death_of_Sir_Nicholas_Bacon_the_Result_of_Poisoning

A. Phoenix, 'The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (hitherto Known as the Northumberland Manuscript), (2022), Chapter 7 entitled 'The Anonymous Leicester's Commonwealth the Most Scandulous and Politically Explosive Tract of the Eliabethan Era', pp. 96-149.  https://www.academia.edu/91789871/The_Bacon_Shakespeare_Manuscript_Hitherto_known_as_the_Northumberland_Manuscript_which_originally_Contained_Copies_of_his_Shakespeare_Plays_Richard_II_and_Richard_III

A. Phoenix, 'Francis Bacon and his Earliest Shakespeare Play Hamlet', (2021), pp. 1-109, esp. pp. 37-54. https://www.academia.edu/48910078/Francis_Bacon_and_his_earliest_Shakespeare_play_Hamlet_A_Tudor_Family_Tragedy

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15 hours ago, Christie Waldman said:

Please, what support do you offer for your rather outrageous opinion that "Dudley most likely poisoned Sir Nicholas Bacon"? What about the narrative that Sir Nicholas is said to have told that the  barber let him fall sleep in front of a window exposed to a cold draft, after which he took ill and died? Why do you not believe this story? Is it not perfectly plausible for an older man whose health was failing (overweight, gout) susceptible to catching cold which turned into something worse? What possible motive could Dudley have had in wanting to see Sir Nicholas dead so badly that he would poison and murder him? Was anyone suggesting this at the time? If so, whom? There was no inquest? On what are you basing this allegation? In general, evidence contrary to what one believes cannot simply be disregarded. It needs to be addressed, if one wishes to be taken seriously. People need to state reasons and sources in support of their opinions. If school children come to SirBacon.org in search of information, they ought to be able to find trustworthy information supported by facts, as is the standard.

Hi Christie. Thank you for addressing this issue once again. You make some very valid points. Taken out of context, the suggestion that Sir Nicholas's life may have been shortened by foul play may sound far-fetched. However, over the course of several lengthy papers, videos and slide series, I think the Phoenixes have established clear grounds for not taking F.B.'s account of his adoptive father's death at face value. Legally, nothing can be proved or disproved at this late stage, but there is enough circumstantial evidence to at least keep an open mind and an open verdict. There must be room for conjecture, even if supportive references are lacking, simply because inquests can be manipulated and "historical accounts" falsified to protect the status quo. 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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